Full Log #5

Complete training session logs dump.

Taken with Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V from Notepad.

Ok, I know … Must confest. Training this under Windows … Guilty as charged!

Training from scratch with gpt2
checkpoint_steps: 100
Train inputs found: 140
Train 2 inputs found: 0


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McLaren

There are also two of the bigger ones.

Budweiser

And one of the smallest is called the “Volta V” which is a small bottle of water. It is similar to an aspirin but with a little more concentrated flavor. The idea is that the water changes from the inside to the outside. The V does not come into contact with your skin or your hair, only with your saliva. The v is a really short glass of water, which is usually about 3.5-6 litres (1.5-3.5 oz.)

There is also one of the smaller ones, which is a big one which is just a bottle of water, usually a small bit, which is almost empty. The water may have the same taste as your regular alcohol, but with a slightly different flavor. The larger one will be the most expensive one, but most people won’t bother.

Pork

You will probably find that it is usually expensive in the United States. You don’t get to buy any of them in your country, because there is nothing called a local country wine. It is an extremely difficult wine to drink in a foreign country.

Budweiser

This is the smaller one. A small bottle of Bessarabia is called the “Taurus” or “Volta.” It is small and has only about 4% alcohol in it. The Taurus has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste similar to your regular alcohol. This can only be found in the United States, so it is very expensive.

Pork

It is a little harder than the Taurus, it has a lot more alcohol in it and it has a slightly different taste. The bottle of Bessarabia is about 1.5-2.5 liters.

Saddlefish

Saddlefish is probably the cheapest one. It has a very small bottle of Bessarabia, which you can only find in Germany, but you can buy from the “Bessarabia Shop” in Hamburg, which is the same place that you would find your regular beer from. It has a much smaller size than the Taurus, with a slightly smaller taste, but it has not really had that much alcohol in it.

Pork

You may also find that it is a very expensive beer or a very expensive wine in the U.S. but you will need to pay for it and pay for the Socks. It will cost about one-third of your regular money, but the Socks will keep you happy for awhile. This is because a very small bottle of Bessarabia can cost as little as 15-20 USD (about 2-5 USD) if you want it.

Raspberry

You will find that it is probably a very expensive beer, or a very expensive wine in the U.S. but you will need to pay for it. The Socks will stay on your lips. There will not be a chance that you will go to the store to buy your new Socks. The Socks will stay on your lips, but they will not stay on your lips at all, just their smell will come back. This is because the alcohol is so diluted, and so it is hard to distinguish between what is actually being added. It’s just like drinking wine or making beer, except you can only drink beer with the Socks. The Socks are very cheap, but they will keep you happy for a while.

Budweiser

The largest one is the Budweiser. A little bottle of Bessarabia has about 6% alcohol in it and has a taste similar to your regular alcohol. It has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste like your regular alcohol. This can only be found in Germany, so it is very expensive.

Pork

The smaller one is the Budweiser. A bottle of Bessarabia has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste similar to your regular alcohol. It has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste similar to your regular alcohol. It has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste like your regular alcohol. This is because it is diluted so much that it has almost no flavor and just looks like your regular alcohol. It’s a good bet that even if you are looking for a more expensive beer, this bottle will not last. It’s a good bet that you will find it in Germany, so it is very cheap.

Saddlefish

This one has a really small bottle. A small bottle has about 6% alcohol in it and has a taste similar to your regular alcohol. It has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste similar to your regular alcohol. It has about 4% alcohol in it and has a taste like your regular alcohol. It has about 4% alcohol in


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transgress and that she did not deserve to be raped as much as he did and the others. It’s a shame.”

Raeber continued, “He could tell because he was a big man. I remember that he had some pretty bad teeth. He was so fat. I remember one time in the shower, he was sitting on a bed and his hands were on his chest and he was really wet.

“I was like, I can’t breathe, I’m so sick. I could tell because he was a big man. It’s a shame.”

“He was a real big man. When he came back to me for treatment, it was like he wanted to go into a hospital. It wasn’t just for women. I was scared that I had become infected. I was scared of him. He had the knowledge of the treatment.”

D.J. DeMarco: (5-10)


D.J. DeMarco, the only former Baylor quarterback with a true freshman season, is trying to get an NCAA scholarship to Baylor. (Photo: John E. Batson, Baylor.com)

D.J. DeMarco, the only former Baylor quarterback with a true freshman season, was a member of Baylor’s football team, which won the 2013 Sun Belt Championship Game and became the first to win two championships.

D.J. DeMarco played six seasons at Baylor, but returned home after taking a recruiting trip to New Hampshire and signing with the Bears. He completed 77 percent of his passes for 1,100 yards and 11 touchdowns.

According to his biography in the student newspaper and biography in The Herald, DeMarco was hired as a quarterback coach on June 20, 2011, for the Baylor Bears.

“This was an amazing opportunity for us,” said DeMarco’s son, David.

D.J. DeMarco is a fourth-year senior for the Cowboys. (Photo: The Dallas Morning News)

Raeber’s father says he believes in that coach, the young quarterback that has never once been called upon in a game to be one of his teammates, but that has been the case with DeMarco and the football team.

“He said, ‘We are in a pretty good position. We just have to work to take care of our own,'” said Raeber, of his father’s decision to leave Baylor. “He said, ‘You know what, I don’t know that I’m being unreasonable in this situation because I’m doing my best and I don’t care how bad that situation is.’

Raeber, who was born in Indiana and attended Baylor in high school, said his son has never felt the need to step down because his brother, who was born in Texas, has no interest in returning to play football.

“That’s what makes a good quarterback,” Raeber said. “You need to learn how to take care of yourself and not just put yourself on the defensive end. He didn’t want to lose any family.”

Raeber said he met with Baylor officials on Wednesday and learned about DeMarco’s decision to stay on.

“He was very gracious to talk to me and to let me know that he was excited about his son leaving Baylor,” Raeber said. “But he also said that his heart was open and that he would never give up and continue his football career.

“That’s my father’s message to you all: He has a lot of talent, a lot of promise. But he hasn’t given up.

“I just think he’s very lucky to get a chance to play for a good team in our country, and I think we all know why.”

D.J. DeMarco is the only senior QB in Baylor history to start all four games of a season at quarterback, and he led the team to its third straight win. (Photo: AP Photo/Troy Taormina)

D.J. DeMarco also was named the Associated Press Offensive Player of the Year in 2013 by the Texas Football Coaches Association and in the AP All-America Defensive Player of the Year by the Texas Tribune Coaches Association.

“I’m very honored, obviously, to be named the AP Offensive Player of the Year,” DeMarco said in a statement released to The Associated Press. “I’m always in love with this organization, and to be selected to this award shows that I am well-rounded.”

“I thank my coaches and my teammates for their kind words and good work. But I also thank them for my love of Baylor and their support and dedication to me and my family,” he added. “I love Baylor the way I love the sport and the way I love to play.”

He went on to say that Baylor’s success had been driven by his parents, his brother, Robert and his mother.

“They supported me, and we’re happy to do it,” De


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untary, or for lawful purposes, to distribute, perform, or provide for the purpose of distributing or providing a copy of a work if the person distributing the work in a work exposed or in another way exposes it to copyright infringement, trademark infringement, copyright infringement or a private right of publicity.

17. As used in this section:

(a) “Publicity” means any of the following:

(i) A notice, public message, news release, statement, letter, report, document, document, news release, or other written statement concerning the administration of the Public Services Act, or a communication or report on the administration of the Public Services Act on behalf of the public or about public services;

(ii) A notice or public message or other communication or report on the administration of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that does not contain a public or a private right of publicity or that does not contain a public or a private right of publicity;

(iii) A word or a word or any other form of information about the operation of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(iv) A communication or report about the enforcement or enforcement of any of the Public Services Act or of any other law that does not contain a public or a private right of publicity or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(v) A word or a word or other form of information about the operation of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(vi) A word or a word or other form of information about the operation of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(vii) A word or a word or other form of information about the operation of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(viii) A word or a word or other form of information about the operation of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(ix) A word or a word or other form of information about the operation of the Public Services Act that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free or that is not intended for distribution, performance, or offering for free;

(x) “Transportation” includes the travel by train of individuals on, from, or across an urban area or area of public transportation; the use of a transportation system that involves a change or alteration of routine or a change in mode of transportation; the installation or installation of a rail line in a rural area or rural area or a train line in a rural area or the use of a streetcar line in a rural area or a streetcar line in a rural area;

(xi) “Transportation system” means an automobile, motorcycle, truck, or other type of transport, including a bicycle, motorized cycle, train, or bus, that does not carry passengers, any baggage or other means of transportation, and that is in operation when the driver of the vehicle and the driver of the motorcycle, motorcycle, or other type of transportation have agreed to participate in the operation;

(xii) “Transmission system” means a computer-driven transport system that involves a change or alteration of routine or a change in mode of transportation; or

(xiii) “Travelers” means anyone who commutes or travels on or through a designated route of a specific geographic area for a period of at least 10 consecutive days, excluding days in the normal course of transit, of persons who are within a specific geographical area for a period of at least 10 consecutive days.

(2) For purposes of this section:

“Transportation system” means a computer-driven transport system that involves a change or alteration of routine or a change in mode of transportation; or “Travelers” means anyone who commutes or travels on or through a designated route of a specific geographic area for a period of at least 10 consecutive days, excluding days in the normal course of transit, of persons who are within a specific geographical area for a period of at least 10 consecutive days.

18. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (3), a person who is not an employee of a public transportation provider, if the person is at a public transportation provider’s office for one or more days (


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Ud.

The only way to know how much money is involved is to ask each person and company in their company to provide their own data.

The idea is to find out how much cash each customer was earning for the year of the transaction. This means that if the amount is based on their share price or the company’s price over the same period, then it would be the same as if the data was based on their share price over that same period.

The company will then check their pricing on their website to see how much money they made.

How much can it take to figure out the number of shares that are in use by a specific customer?

That is, how much money can a company make for a certain number of customers?

As you can see, there is a huge amount of money involved in this process. There is some sort of correlation between the percentage of the company’s shareholders and the percentage of the company’s users.

How does it work?

The way this works is that if your company has more than 1 million members (the same number of people as a company) and every member has some amount of cash in the account that goes into the account, they will be able to calculate a share price.

With a company that is not part of any of the four major financial services providers, this may be useful, but at the same time will be difficult.

What do the numbers look like?

The company can see the company’s revenue from transactions on their site with a high level of certainty.

They can also measure the money in the account to find out the amount of the cash that went into it.

If the company can find out that a large portion of the company’s users are not using the site at all, then they will be able to calculate an average of all their user fees.

How does this work?

By using the company’s website, they can see where all of their spending goes.

They may have even found out who is using their data.

If the company uses their own database, then it will be able to see how much of their user activity was actually spent on their business.

The company can also determine how much money they spent on their user activities.

What do the numbers look like?

The company can look at the number of transactions they have made using their website or how much money they’ve made on a particular business.

As I mentioned before, this is a simple process and there is nothing quite like it for a large organisation like this.

What can you tell me about this process?

I am not a big fan of numbers, so let me just say that I have heard of a lot of different things in the past. I am not particularly interested in how many transactions are being made every day. This seems like a fair way of categorising things that aren’t as common.

But there is no denying that many people use their data and their activities to help make a living.

The fact that there are so many numbers in our society that don’t get reported in the media is no reason to take this much information seriously.

There will still be times when I’ll just say that this process has failed and I think we’ll just say that we’re just now starting to make a little bit of money off it.

If you would like to learn more about the data collection process, I highly recommend looking into this excellent post by Kevin.


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Deck, to be precise. We need to take it to an early grave!


We are already having several tests running in which we are testing the first level of the player with a very aggressive approach that is a big part of our game plan and is designed to work with everyone. One of the things that is really going to happen in our testing is that we will be testing some really cool strategies that are coming out that will not have been tested yet, but are actually coming out of our initial version of the game. These are things like, “hey, when we do this, I want to be able to do a lot of the cool stuff!” These are things that are already on our end of the testing table that we’re actually taking the first step on and we’re just giving it time to see how it can be accomplished in the game. We’re testing some really cool things now and going to try to do the most great things that we can, but we will still have to work to make it work.


You’ve talked about the “meta” for the game. In the early days of the game you saw some interesting strategies. There have been some really good cards on the ladder and the meta of this game is changing a bit, as well as some really cool decks that we have seen coming out and we’re doing some really cool things with them. There has also been a lot of really interesting decks coming out that I am very excited to play with and look forward to playing with this time in my own personal life. As a result, it’s something that I am very excited to play with in our next expansion!


That said, a lot of your time as a writer has been dedicated to being a great contributor to the game. What kind of contributions do you hope will help you make in this regard?


Well, a lot. That’s my main focus right now, and I’m very excited about it. In fact, I’m going to be a fan of the art style as well, so I am going to be putting my mind to it very carefully.


It’s going to take a while to get this stuff all together, so we’ll wait.


The first expansion was released in September 2014. Has there been some progress in the development of the game over the course of the past few months?


No, this is a big, big, big deal. We started work on the game around October 2010, and have been working on this for a long time, and we feel that the game is well ahead of the curve right now, and we really look forward to seeing if it’s able to be released in the coming months.


The biggest challenge for me is that I have had very little to play with, so I can’t play the game to the fullest that way. It’s a much more manageable game for me. It is going to be quite a lot easier to play the game when I have some time away from the game and I can play the game to the fullest.


What do you hope to be doing with your time working on this game?


We have a big amount of time left in the game, so the pace of the game has been very steady, and I will be playing this game a lot more. I want to see what the game will have, and we also want to try to make it as unique as possible to a large number of players. I’m really excited about what we are doing here and what we’re doing in the game, but at the same time I’m really looking forward to doing some more work to make it more unique as well.


When I say I have a lot of time to play, it is not like I am just playing to the fullest with this game, but I also am excited about what we can do next in terms of the game, as well.


I’ve been doing a lot of research about the game in order to make sure that it fits with what the team wants to do. There have been some interesting things we’ve tried out, so I’m very excited about that.


It seems that you have a new idea in mind for the game that you’ve been working on. What is that and what does it mean to you as a writer and what can you offer to the community that has seen your work for years?


I really want to make sure that the game is the best game we can make, and it’s not a matter of if. I am really, really excited to play the game and to be able to make fun and interesting and I think it’s going to be really fun to make this game with.


One of the things I like about your writing has been the ability to write over a long period of time. Are there any secrets you don’t have to reveal in order to have your story be interesting?


I really like it when I write about what I want to do, but I also want to keep as much


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Innov. But these are the most expensive and risky ideas to develop on a large scale, especially when we’re talking about something that takes decades to develop and actually has some high-fantasy value. But it’s actually the right thing to do.

That said, a lot of my advice is to get people to do things that are not easy and expensive. I’ll give you the best answer here — not the best way to build something that is difficult, but something that you can actually go out and do. It’s a long process of building things.

When I say it’s difficult, I mean that’s why I’ll put it that way. I’m a pretty straightforward person, and a lot of people would tell me, “Just make sure to build something that’s not difficult.” And it’s so easy.

I’ll show you how to do that, because it’s the only way I can say it — which is to say that I believe it’s actually a very complicated piece of infrastructure — but if you take a look at the whole, “Okay, I’ve got to make it a little easier for you,” kind of like, just like the “No-One Has Seen It before” or “It’s not easy” thing — I think that’s why people think it’s so easy. That it’s really hard to think about for years and years. And if you can, you should, you should try to make it as easy as you can, because it’s really, really hard.

This time we’re talking about “unlocked by one condition,” so you could call it “limited.” But what about “locked by one condition”? The way you’ll set the bar for how big it is to go for is very different, but the problem here is, in terms of what we have right now, there are some conditions that are, but in terms of what is going to happen over time, there are others.

The thing is, when it comes to the stuff that’s going to be hard to do. One of my favorite things I’ve done for 20 years is this amazing game called “Unlock the Lockbox.” And it was so easy to do and so easy to get the right number of things to be unlocked, so the fact that I had all these different pieces of the puzzle together and made them do it — I was a master engineer, so I did a lot of experiments, and they were perfect.

But what happens if all these pieces come together and make it impossible? What if all of those pieces come together and turn out to be impossible? What if that’s what happens. And that’s really important.

A lot of people think that if you’re going to make a game like that, you can’t just just take all the pieces, put them together and have the right number of things. And then I think it’s actually quite true:

I can’t do it all with just the right combination of pieces. I have to do some things with the right number of things. So, I know that some people think that maybe you can’t. But it is not something that I can do.

A lot of people say that if they’re going to make a game like that, you just have to put the right pieces together and have the right pieces to make it. But I think that’s pretty true.

The thing is, there’s a lot of people who don’t know that, and I’m just going to put my whole life into doing this. I’m not going to give up. But I hope that by this time next year you’ll have a game that’s as challenging as it is beautiful.

I just want you to know that what I’m talking about here is not something that you should have to be working on. It’s not something that should be hard or risky. It’s not something that shouldn’t be done. And if you’re not willing to do it, it’s actually going to do something very difficult, very, very difficult. And so, it is going to happen. And you can’t change it.


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�3$0$0.25$0.75$0.8$0.2$0.25$0.2$0.35$0.35$0.30$0.30$0.35$0.3$0.4$0.4$0.4$0.4$0.4$0.4$0.5$0.5$0.5$0.5$0.5$0.6$0.5$0.6$0.6$0.7$0.7$0.7$0.7$0.7$0.7$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.8$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9$0.9


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onga to the west of the country, after the Spanish Revolution. A year later the Italian republic was founded.

It became the official headquarters for the revolutionary party, while the government was supported by Spain’s parliament. As early as 1928 there were a number of organisations in the party. The main one was the Spanish Socialist Labour Party, with its members of the general public, members of the Social Democratic League (popular movement), members of the National Democratic Assembly (provisional party), and members of the National Executive Committee. It is important to point out that at the time of the Second World War, only a small number of members were working on behalf of the British and the Soviets. The Bolsheviks were in the position to make a new organization in order to form a government, but when the Bolsheviks won power in 1917 and forced the government into the hands of the workers, many of their members deserted to support the Bolsheviks.

The Soviet Union was divided into several separate political parties. The government was led by a revolutionary, who took the form of a member of the Workers’ Party. The leadership of these three parties were then formed. The Bolsheviks were the new political party in 1924.

The Communist Party, however, was formed in April 1929, as the Central Committee had decided to make its first meeting in Moscow, while the Social Democrats, whose members were not of the Communist Party, were the newly formed provisional party. It was to be held at St. Petersburg until the party went to power on October 1, 1928, when Lenin had already proclaimed himself the first Communist leader in the Russian country.

The Party was formed in October 1928 and immediately became the central organ of the working class party. This party held its first congress in May 1933, and it became the largest in Russia in 1939 and the first major socialist party in the world. It was then taken over by the Bolsheviks and subsequently incorporated into the Soviet government.

The main party of the Communist Party was the Soviet Union Communist Party, based in the Moscow metropolitan area. The organization, though largely independent of the Communist Party in Europe, was officially sanctioned by the Soviet Union. This allowed the Party to hold its first meeting in Moscow on November 1, 1933, while a second meeting was held at Moscow on December 1, 1933. A few months later, on September 1, 1933, the Russian Communist Party, under the leadership of General Nikita Khrushchev, was dissolved.

In 1931, during the opening of the Communist International Congress, the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Russia was called back to power, in spite of the fact that the Bolshevik government of Vladimir Lenin had made it impossible for it to retain its monopoly on state power. In October 1933, the Party was given the rank of Deputy Party. The Bolsheviks were then expelled from the Party. In September 1933, the Bolsheviks expelled Lenin, and a third party was formed called the Russian Communist Party.

Although the Party held its first congress at Moscow in 1932, and its first meeting in Moscow, the Soviet Union did not accept a full membership of the Communist Party.

The Soviet Union had an active role in the anti-Semitism, terrorism, and anti-Communist organizations. This was reflected in the political activities of the Soviet Union. It made no official effort to change the party, and was constantly under criticism for its efforts in combating anti-Semitic and anti-Communist organizations. The Party was frequently attacked for its support of German and Japanese imperialism. The Party’s internationalism was sometimes stated by its leaders as being anti-Semitic. In reality, the Party’s internationalism was merely a ploy to weaken the Soviet Union.

The Party was in fact supported by many of the German and Japanese Jews. In 1929 the German government expelled the Party from its membership, and in January 1931 the Soviet Union was forced to declare the Party the principal member of the Communist Party of Europe.

The Russian State had long ago established itself as the main state of the world and the Soviet Union as the main state of the world. The State’s leaders considered Russia, its neighbours, the countries of Europe, and even the former allies of their own great power to be a “national state.” The State considered that only the Jews could make their home here. However, this was never achieved, and in 1936 the Soviet Union was founded. The Russian Government, like all political governments, sought to establish a new state of “world power” through its rule of the Jews. In 1931 the Communist Party, while recognizing the historic connection between Jews and the “world powers” and trying to bring about this “unity,” took no interest in establishing a state of Jewish dominance.

In July 1936, the Soviet Union announced that the Bolsheviks would establish a new state of Soviet power. This came at a time when the government was under increasing pressure, and was in the process of laying down its repressive measures and finally making it difficult to govern in the Soviet Union. The Bolsheviks immediately began


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tactile that I did not know how to put into words. This was quite possibly the most important part of his job to me. In my mind, I had been given the option of being told the truth by the police, or to be told the truth by a third party, and to be forced to take their word that it wasn’t my fault, and it would be the duty of the police to make sure I never got to jail.

I wanted to make the best use of my position at the time. I was being asked to give the facts of the case and then had the authority to make a verdict if I disagreed with them. I did this with the understanding that the case would ultimately go to trial, and I was free to do as I wanted. The facts I could give them would be irrelevant to a case at all, as it was all circumstantial, and there were very few points where it became obvious that I was wrong.

Then there was the fact that I was going to live. I was supposed to live as a single man, without a place to go in order to get away from my parents. That was my first real desire, to be a single man in the UK. And I made the decision that the only place in which I could do so, was in London, where it was so different from my home. I wanted my home to be safe, so I lived there as a single man.

I wanted to be a good person. I wanted to be able to live with my parents in peace, and as much as I wanted them to. I wanted my own home. But I also wanted a home that was in my own city, in my own country. And I believed that I could do that. I believe that I was right to live as a single man.

But I couldn’t. My children didn’t have the same way of thinking. I couldn’t leave the house without having my children at the door. I didn’t see the point.

After years of living with my family, living with my parents, my own family, my own country, it just never worked. I have a lot to live for, and I’m going to try to find the time to do so.

I would like to take that opportunity now. Because, as an individual, I want to be a better person. I want to give everything I have to my children, because my parents and other people don’t have any time to be alone. I want to give them a sense of security, because I want them to know that my children are safe.

We have to be a better family. I don’t want my child to be alone. I want her to understand that she has to be with me. That she’s part of this. She knows what she’s doing. And that she has an opportunity to do so.

This will not change overnight. There will be no change for four years after I leave, and a couple of years after I leave. I will continue my life with my family, but I want to take that opportunity now. I’m in no way suggesting that I don’t want to. I don’t. But there are people who need the time. If it was my kids, they would see what I was doing, and they would know what my children are doing.

I want the people of London and other parts of the country to know what they need from me. They need the chance to have a better life. I want them to know that I’m there for them, for their children. I want them to know that I love them.

In that sense, I feel privileged to be a part of what I did. I feel my children are still important to me, so I want to continue to do that. And the people of London are the ones that will have to deal with the fallout.

When I speak to my children and their families, I feel like I’m doing the right thing. I’m not trying to make a scapegoat out of anyone. It’s just about helping them. I want to help them find their way, and to try to build on what they’ve been through. I want to help them know that there’s a way forward, and I’m going to continue doing that.

I want my children to find someplace that they can come to, where they can enjoy themselves and enjoy the things I’ve done.

I’m sorry I couldn’t speak to them, but I just want them to know that I’m here for them, for my children, and for my family.

I’d like to hear your thoughts on how to respond to my interview. Please leave your questions below.


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este to the post. (Note: I do not know if it is the same as the one for the post, but I have seen it before, so I don’t know.)

This recipe is so simple and easy, it’s been a long time since I’ve tried to cook a recipe that will make you happy. I promise it will make you feel so much better. I don’t think I’ll ever leave you disappointed.

I’ve made many people happy. I know I will! I’ve loved so many recipes, so many dishes, so many people. The most popular one? The one I’ve been dying to try this year for a few weeks now!

If you’re not in the habit of taking a few days off work, here are some ways to keep up with your job schedule.

Get Your Phone Out of the Way!

Not everyone needs to come in every morning to cook for the rest of the day, but if you work that much, you will need to come in every morning for about three hours for at least one hour to cook for your friends, family, and coworkers. This will make it more convenient to go out every night. (If you want to work for hours, be sure to go in to your room at 8pm on a Thursday afternoon to see how they are doing.)

A friend of mine always says she has had two or three good cook-outs in the last week. I have. It is true. You can usually order an appetizer or two for every meal or two. The only difference is that you get to eat what you want, and the appetizer and the dinner make no difference. In fact, it’s more important than ever to try something different.

And because it is so easy to get out of your comfort zone, I am especially honored and grateful to have this blog with me. I hope you enjoy it.

If you have a question about cooking, there are countless answers here. But please leave me a comment if you are unfamiliar with some of them.

For every question I have received, I have asked you to give it a read. If you are an aspiring chef, you can read and comment here about why you love cooking and want to try it, but please bear in mind that this is just my humble blog.

For any questions about recipes, feel free to ask in the comments.

Thanks again for reading!

Happy Cooking!


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employers. I have to give you credit for putting it all together to say you are a pretty good investor,” said Mr. Trump. “You’ve got to be extremely careful with your investments. You’ve got to understand that the things that you do will be much more beneficial than a lot of people imagine.”

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Trump will be inaugurated on Jan. 20, 2017.

Mr. Trump has said he will take no more executive action on Wall Street and trade. He has promised to work to limit regulations on Wall Street and said he would focus on protecting the country’s economy, particularly through a sweeping proposal to regulate Wall Street that would increase the size of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet, reduce regulation of banks and increase financial regulation of Wall Street and credit risk by requiring that companies invest in their own debt rather than on the banks’ own stock.

Mr. Trump said his promise to “make Wall Street and the Federal Reserve great again” had been “somewhat elusive” for him. But he said he was already moving ahead with that goal. “It’s going to be a great deal,” he said. “I’ve got to be honest. I think I’m very, very confident in this one thing.”

And some say he may be moving ahead too fast, and even in what may be an impromptu meeting with congressional leaders.

Mr. Cohn has been in the spotlight more recently for comments he made about an investment firm he has accused of helping the Trump campaign, a source told Bloomberg in an interview. The bank, a government bailout, made a bad deal with Mr. Trump, then helped him, the source said, because the investment was a scam.

When asked whether he would be willing to take any action to keep the issue of Trump Tower in New York’s East Village under wraps for now, Mr. Cohn said, “I think that’s part of the problem. I want to find the best deal, and that will mean taking any necessary steps. But I’m not going to give in to people who are looking for bad deals. It’s a business question. There’s nobody better at keeping it than me. And I’m not going to give up on it.”


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810 to 12:20am.

Downtown Melbourne:

Closed on Sunday for the day.

There are many ways you can get in and out of the city. Take the tram or go to the bus stop at 2:30pm (1:30pm peak time).

Bus service from Melbourne CBD to Victoria Street (between 1pm and 3pm peak time).

The CBD is a popular place to see, drink and take in Melbourne’s sights. It is very convenient for most commuters and easy to get around. The CBD has many cafes in it including a Starbucks, Cafe Niehaus, and many more!

Stay up to date with traffic through the streets and see for yourself how the city is being run.


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aer:

“I will be honest with you. I have to think the team was pretty good. This team is getting a little bit better, but I am sure the rest of the team is pretty good. But we haven’t won a trophy yet.”

Asked if he is disappointed by his performance in qualifying for the race, which began at the same time as he scored his first three points of the season, Mourinho said: “No, no, no. It has nothing to do with the fact that I got off the podium.

“My last three days have been fantastic. I’ve got more points than my team-mates. The way we went into qualifying we were very, very lucky. The result was good but if we had gone out, it would have been a better result, but for all the things that we have been through, it’s always difficult to win this game. I was happy with the way things have been going, so I have been very happy.

“It is not a surprise we’ve got a lot of work to do. The only thing that has to be done is make sure we play the best football possible and I think that’s the biggest thing. I’ve been training with the squad and I will be playing some real good football. It is what it is.

“You do have to be in a tough situation. But when you look at all the things that have happened this year, everything has been fantastic for us. We have not just been good and excellent, but we have had a lot of good things to do in all those different fields. We did really well for the last few days and then some.

“I have to say that, although I am not all that happy with myself, the team is all right. We had a good start but then it got very, very cold. When we had the heat of it it was really good for us. It is a big challenge. It’s all about the football. The players are in a good mood, and I am sure that they will be well, too.”

Mourinho’s comments were in response to the team’s recent performances during the race which have proved to be a huge part of his squad’s performance.

“There is a lot going on in this race and I am quite pleased that I was able to improve a little bit as a result of the experience. I was able to take a couple of more positive shots and they looked really good.

“I am happy that I was able to score some goals and that I am playing a very good game, but my confidence will be more at the top of my game. The good is that it has been a lot of fun, and I feel very good about it. I am a really good footballer but I am playing in the right way.”


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Kart, which is a very difficult car, is a big deal, and it’s the most important car we have.

What do you hope to do with it?

I hope to make more cars. In the long run we’ll be able to build something very special. It might take another five years. I hope that it will help others. It is a very important step for us.

I have not met anyone, and there were no children who could play with me.

That makes it a bit hard. If you could live a normal life you could play with the world. So this car is very special for you. If you live a normal life, why do you need this car?

It’s a very special car. It’s a very special car that we built to get the best possible performance from this car. We don’t want to let people go wrong. This car is not something that has been made for other countries. If there are problems or difficulties, we can go and solve them.

A lot of people are unhappy with the car. They want it to be for the best. They want the best possible for themselves. But they don’t care.

If they feel that this car is for a country like theirs, they might take the car out of the country and buy it at some point. I can’t say that there won’t be more problems.

What do you think of the Japanese carmaker?

I think we should make the most of the opportunities. If there are any problems, we should make it right.

Do you think that if a country has a car that isn’t as good as ours, they can put up with it?

They should try and try and find ways to improve things in order to make their car even better.

That’s the idea.

You are an automotive journalist. What’s the most important thing for people who are not professionals?

The world needs to hear that. There is no better way than that. We need to hear that.

People will pay attention to you when you talk about cars. They will notice.

People will think about this car in an interesting way. It is not something that has been made for other countries. The world will look at it.

It is very special for us. We will have to take this car to the highest point of the world.


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wt and H&N, and I believe we could also see them moving more towards a more mainstream approach with their own products, rather than just a label-driven one, and more focus on brands that are already recognizable, even as they do not have a large or lasting footprint. I also believe we could see them switching from a more aspirational brand to something brand-branded. I think that it is highly likely that the trend of brand-led fashion is on the horizon.


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diseases and diseases.

We could get some ideas about what it would mean if the government had made no changes and had kept up its current practices. I am a little disappointed in the lack of a clear understanding of what is meant by the words “government”. It is just a term for government.


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erie

I am the only woman who doesn’t work with men in this industry. You’ll never find a woman who can.

—Mycroft

I have the best of intentions, but my intentions and goals are not always in the best interests of my men. When women don’t like their men, they are usually forced to put their time and energy into women who are too “out of line.”

—Lady Lassie

The people who will not love you should be your family and friends. No matter how much time you spend in the world, you are going to have a hard time getting through your twenties.

—Amber

I am a father.

—Jane

I am so, so lucky.

—Tiffany

I am so thankful for what you have done for me.

—P.T. Barnard


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113 to 12.9 m (6-13 in.), 10 to 14 m (5-14 in.), or 16 to 20 cm in (5-6 in.). In order to measure height above the head, the following measurements are needed: (1) Measurements of head circumference by a person with or without a permanent head cap or a permanent eye.

(2) Measures of head circumference of at least 23 cm (15-18 in.).

(3) Measurements of head circumference of at least 35 cm (25-33 in.).

(4) Measurements of head circumference of at least 35 cm (37-42 in.).

(5) Measurements of head circumference of at least 44 cm (47-49 in.).

(6) Measures of head circumference of at least 49 cm (50-52 in.).

(7) Measures of head circumference of at least 54 cm (54-58 in.).

(8) Measurements of head circumference of at least 58 cm (58-66 in.)

(9) Measurements of head circumference of at least 69 cm (69-82 in.).

(10) Measurements of head circumference of at least 71 cm (72-86 in.)

(11) Measurements of head circumference of at least 77 cm (77-82 in.).

(12) Measurements of head circumference of at least 84 cm (84-92 in.)

(13) Measurements of head circumference of at least 90 cm (90-94 in.)

(14) Measurements of head circumference of at least 96 cm (96-98 in.)

(15) Measurements of head circumference of at least 99 cm (99-103 in.)

(16) Measurements of head circumference of at least 104 cm (104-102 in.)

(17) Measurements of head circumference of at least 106 cm (106-113 in.)

(18) Measurements of head circumference of at least 108 cm (108-109 in.)

(19) Measurements of head circumference of at least 112 cm (112-117 in.)

(20) Measurements of head circumference of at least 118 cm (118-120 in.)

(21) Measurements of head circumference of at least 120 cm (120-121 in.)

(22) Measurements of head circumference of at least 122 cm (122-122 in.)

(23) Measurements of head circumference of at least 123 cm (123-124 in.)

(24) Measurements of head circumference of at least 125 cm (125-127 in.)

(25) Measurements of head circumference of at least 128 cm (128-129 in.)

(26) Measurements of head circumference of at least 129 cm (129-131 in.)

(27) Measurements of head circumference of at least 131 cm (131-133 in.)

(28) Measurements of head circumference of at least 134 cm (134-135 in.)

(29) Measurements of head circumference of at least 136 cm (136-137 in.)

(30) Measurements of head circumference of at least 138 cm (138-139 in.)

(31) Measurements of head circumference of at least 141 cm (141-142 in.)

(32) Measurements of head circumference of at least 143 cm (143-146 in.)

(33) Measurements of head circumference of at least 147 cm (147-148 in.)

(34) Measurements of head circumference of at least 149 cm (149-155 in.)

(35) Measurements of head circumference of at least 157 cm (157-160 in.)

(36) Measurements of head circumference of at least 161 cm (161-162 in.)

(37) Measurements of head circumference of at least 164 cm (164-165 in.)

(38) Measurements of head circumference of at least 166 cm (166-167 in.)

(39) Measurements of head circumference of at least 168 cm (168-169 in.)

(40) Measurements of head circumference of at least 171 cm (171-172 in.)

(41) Measurements of head circumference of at least 173 cm (173-174 in.)

(42) Measurements of head circumference of at least 175 cm (175-176 in.)

(43) Measurements of head circumference of at least 178 cm (178-179 in.)

(44) Measurements of head circumference of at least 179 cm (179-180 in.)

(45) Measurements of head circumference of at least 181 cm (181-182 in.)

(46) Measurements of head circumference of at least 182 cm (182-183 in.)

(47) Measurements of head circumference


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Serbian to their first language, though it remains a long-standing language in Germany. They are also the only European country who is not currently the only one with a native German speaker in that country. (See also: Germany as a language of oppression by the Ottoman Empire.)

In 1819, the German parliament approved the establishment of a German government in Germany called the German Chancellery. In its first years, the German language was almost never spoken in any public or private office, including a school, government or municipal government.

The language was largely retained for a relatively short time, though Germans kept it close and learned it at a younger age. In some places it remained in use until the mid-1800s. In many countries it is used with the same ease and sensitivity.

The majority of the languages spoken in Germany are English, French, Italian and German, though there is some linguistic variation as the English is generally found in less important German and French regions. Many of the languages spoken in Germany also have a strong German character. Many of the languages spoken in Germany are spoken in an unusual way, such as at night, in which a certain person will call aloud certain German words and other words of the alphabet.

One or two languages are known for their pronunciation of letters with which they are familiar. In addition, there are dialects which distinguish between the different dialects of different languages. There are a number of dialects with different names.

Some dialects, however, have their own distinctive names.

The language of the Reichsbank, for example, is German, whereas the dialects of Austria, France and Germany are German.

The German language is generally considered the second oldest in the world. The German language began as an alien language, an Arabic dialect, a Chinese, a Spanish and other language.

Some scholars call the German Reichsbank, which originally became known as the Reichsberg, “the most ancient of all the ancient languages, and most of the oldest of all the languages spoken in the whole world.”


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material-color-light-dark, light-medium-dark, light-dark-medium).

In other words, a light-medium is not a light-dark light, but a light-medium is a light-medium.

In the context of “light-dark” light, the term “light-medium” means a medium to which light from the above spectrum can reach.

If the spectrum from which the light is coming from is larger than the wavelength of the light, then it is in the center of the spectrum of a light medium.

So it is possible to create a light medium, say, with a wavelength of a light-medium of 40 nm. This can be achieved using a “normal” light source, such as a fluorescent light bulb, a fluorescent lamp, a fluorescent source, and so on, by means of a wavelength. This type of light source is called a normal, “dark light,” or a light medium.

The same light source can have an intensity of at least 25% of the light level. In other words, it will produce at least 30% of the light level when light is being emitted, or more.

So the answer is yes! There is no dark light; it is a medium-to-dark light!

However, a light medium can be created if we apply the right conditions.

We are talking about light at the extreme center of the spectrum of an ordinary light source.

For example, if you have a typical fluorescent bulb, which has a wavelength of around 30 nm, and the light in its wavelength is at least 40% of the wavelength of the light, you can create a light medium that has an intensity of at least 10%. This means that it can produce 20 times as much light than the average bulb of the same size.

A light medium has a light source that is so bright that it can be detected by a laser or an infrared telescope (though it can also be detected by a fluorescent light bulb that is just as bright).

This light medium is in fact capable of producing at least 30% of the total light level.

If you apply the correct conditions, and that is the key, the medium is made lighter, and will produce much less light than the bulb in its wavelength.

However, if the light source is too bright for the light source to absorb it, then the light can cause it to fail.

If the bulb fails, then the bulb is not a light medium, and there is no problem in the production of the light that will be reflected back in the light.

As a matter of fact, if you combine the best of all possible light sources, one light medium, and an effective light source, your light medium will not produce such an intense, high, bright light.

If you combine an extremely light-medium like an old, old-fashioned, light bulb, and a light source that is too bright, the light may not have been absorbed as well as it would have been otherwise.

When a new, light-medium-like bulb is introduced, the lamp light output becomes extremely bright.

So it is possible for you to create a light medium with a light source so bright and so light-piercing, that your light source cannot absorb as much light as would normally be absorbed by a normal bulb.

The light bulb itself will not absorb light, and it will not be able to produce more light than normal light. It will only produce one beam at a time, and that beam will have an intensity of at least 20% of the intensity.

You have an ordinary, ordinary light-medium, but it has an extremely light-piercing lamp light source. This lamp light source cannot produce enough light to produce enough light to produce the best light.

So it is also possible to create a light medium with a light source that does not produce too much light, but with enough light to produce more light.

This is what the term “normal” light is supposed to mean.

I am talking about a medium of about 2.5x as bright as the bulb of that bulb in its wavelength.

This is because your light source will not absorb as much light as your lamp bulb does, as it will not have a source of light that is at least a wavelength greater than its wavelength.

And as you get closer to your light source, the bulb will not be able to absorb as much light as normal bulbs.

So, if you give yourself a good-quality bulb, and you choose a lamp with a very bright, bright light source, your light medium will not produce too much light.

And your light medium will be not only stronger, but it will produce an even higher, high output of light than your lamp bulb would normally produce.

I have already mentioned how light can absorb and produce great light, but it


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strengthens. They are so close, but they are very small compared to a man’s feet, and their feet are small. So they have been brought forth by the winds and have been lifted up to heaven. They come out from heaven and bring forth their own spirits, and then they shall ascend. If, like the Hebrews, they are in a state of trembling, or have difficulty keeping up, they will come down, and they will be lifted up.

I have said more than once that this is the best and most precious thing of all I know. But I shall not go further. If this be the case, if any man be able, I shall be able to perform it.

But if I am not then you will tell me in one way, what do you mean by my words?

My friend is a man of a different language than yours, and he speaks two things. He speaks of heaven and earth.

They may talk about heaven or earth, but heaven is the supreme law of the earth; and it is the law that binds men.

You say, therefore, that this God is a divine law, and that men are created in his image. Now, when he says that it is written that the Lord God in heaven can create the things that we have created, it does not mean that it is written by any other law. He speaks, indeed, of his glory and dominion. It is not a law, or of any particular man, which should be passed over to another in the law.

If we choose to speak the law of heaven, we should speak the law of earth, and that which is written in the book of the Law of Solomon is the same, not a law written by any one of the earth.

The earth is made of gold; and that which is gold in the law of heaven is the same in all of us; and that which is made of gold in the law of heaven is the same.

There is no man or beast of man, whose name or likeness is immortal.

No man or beast, but only the Creator, has this same law, as if he had created the world, and gave it to all.

We are not yet created in the likeness of any other man or beast.

No one of us is a beast of man, but a mortal man.

No one is in the likeness of the spirit of any man.

If they were created in likeness, and they were not created in likeness, then no one would ever go through this law, and there would be no more men. If any man were to say that this law is true, he would give every word he said, in the language which he speaks of heaven and earth.

And if you have not heard these words of mine, and are not ignorant, then you will find it necessary to learn a few things from my words, so as you may make a man understand what I have said.

What I say is, that you, who do not know that there are two ways in which we may believe, and which are contrary to my word, are ignorant of what I have said.

I speak this to make the world a better place, and to make it better for men, because I am the true Lord, and I am God.

My word is this, that this God is true; and therefore it is true of all men. For though there are two ways of speaking, I speak of God and men.

It may not be that I speak of men in this manner, that we must not be in every way. The reason which I have given is, that I am not speaking of God alone. I speak of men by this means, and to make the world a better place than it is.

I speak of men in this manner, because there are two ways of speaking, which I call the two ways of speaking, and men.

Men speak for God.

Men speak for God.

I do not speak of men in this way, that men may not speak for me.

Therefore men speak for God, who loves men and men love God.

My word is this, that I say that every man should speak for God, for all men. For I say this, that this one may speak for God, for all men, and he who has spoken for me must be called my lord.

My word is this, that all men must speak for God, who loves all men.

I speak this to make men better and more perfect than they were before, and to give the world its good fortune, to increase their lives and their wealth, to change their own character.

In this way, by which I am speaking of the two ways of speaking, I will speak of them together.

So all men, when I speak of God and men, shall speak


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filed that the officers in that case had reasonable grounds to believe they were carrying out an act of war that was a violation of federal law. In fact, the Supreme Court held that the federal law in question violated the First Amendment, and, in that case, the State took the Fifth.

This means that if your law suit is frivolous, you must pay a penalty. If, however, you fail to pay the $20 penalty, you lose the case.

This rule, however, does not affect the law suits brought against state and local police departments in Louisiana and Texas. They cannot appeal, but are left in the hands of the state’s attorney general, who must decide what should be allowed and what cannot be.

A third benefit of state and local police departments’ refusal to admit the evidence of the officers’ misconduct is that the state courts have long held that state officers are subject to the rule that no state court is bound to decide whether evidence is relevant in criminal matters. This rule is particularly important because many police officers do not file any forms of court-authorized documentation that the courts consider relevant to a criminal matter.

By denying state police officers an absolute right to refuse to testify, they are subject to a legal duty to be heard. Therefore, they cannot challenge the evidence they give and to say that they have no right to be heard. Moreover, state police officers who refuse to testify can have their cases dismissed at any time. This may have the effect of discouraging others from testifying, and makes it harder for others to pursue their own civil cases.

Because the officers do not have to be required to give any proof that they are guilty, it will be difficult to prove to a jury that they are not. Thus, some state police officers may be barred from presenting evidence that proves the guilt of the defendants, and other police officers may be allowed to present evidence that proves the innocence of any suspect.

So, for example, a state police officer who told the officers in the first case that the police had shot and killed Freddie Gray is subject to a civil civil court’s duty of proof to prove the innocence of Gray when he died. As a result, the officers who are not subject to this duty of proof can also be barred from presenting testimony that proves Gray was not shot or killed, and cannot testify at trial. But the officers cannot ask, for example, that Gray did not have a gun or any other dangerous weapon when Gray was shot and killed. It is a very simple matter of proving that the officers were not guilty.

In Louisiana, this is often done by putting evidence before a judge. But the state courts never have the power to force a judge to show how many or how many probable cause to conclude that there was probable cause to believe that Gray was at large. When it is clear that Gray was shot or killed in self-defense, it is not clear whether the officers acted with an intent to kill Gray. As the Supreme Court has pointed out in the past, however, “evidence of a deliberate or planned action which is a part of the crime is not conclusive, and, therefore, is not prima facie evidence of the other criminal act.”

So, for example, if a police officer said that the cops had shot Gray because he was unarmed, but failed to say that Gray was shot, that would not be proof that the officers were not guilty. If the police officer says that the cops were not guilty, that is not a true and correct statement of the law.

There is a third, even more important, aspect to the law suit: the fact that the officers are not in the business of serving justice. This is a critical issue. If, on the contrary, a state officer believes that he has a duty to obey an order in a criminal case that he is required to produce in order to serve his state, he has a legal right to refuse to testify.

To be sure, there are some cases where a police officer has violated this right. In one of those cases, a sheriff’s deputy shot and killed Gray in self-defense. But even if the officers knew Gray was not an innocent person, he still can not be charged with a crime because there was probable cause to believe he had an unlawful or immoral act that was not an act of war.

In Louisiana, a similar right to refuse to testify comes with certain limitations. These restrictions include that a sheriff must give the police a reasonable chance to prove that Gray was not at large before they took him to jail. But if they have not, the police can not charge them with any crime.

In Texas, the Texas Supreme Court ruled that in order for a person to be charged with a crime, he must first show that he is not being charged because he has “no right to appear before a court for prosecution for any crime of which he is charged.” Although the court did not rule that Texas’s law was unconstitutional because it lacked a categorical prohibition on refusing to testify


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

lobbyist is under fire after the Republican-controlled Senate voted 6-4 last week to send him a two-year ban on executive branch nominations for the position.

The move came after Grassley called Trump’s ban “reckless and unconstitutional” and “clearly a clear attempt to thwart the very interests the president supports.”

In the Senate, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, sent a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee, the Senate intelligence panel, Senate Banking Committee and the House judiciary committee asking Grassley to reconsider the order.

Grassley has said he will back Grassley’s request, although the GOP senator’s move is not expected to help Grassley’s efforts to block Obama’s executive orders.

The Senate intelligence panel, led by Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado, asked Grassley to block Obama’s proposed executive order on climate change. Udall, who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in an interview with The Associated Press that he and other senators have been “in touch” with the White House, and have said they have “expect a bipartisan vote” this week.


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

mg. and a high ratio of protein to fat.

For the purpose of this study we have evaluated the influence of calcium intake and carbohydrate intake on the energy level in obese individuals. The energy content of low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet participants was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of high-carbohydrate diet participants. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Therefore, our results should be interpreted with caution because the associations between energy intake and body composition are not yet well characterized.

TABLE 2 Number of food items (g) 1.0 ± 0.9 3.2 ± 1.6 3.1 ± 1.3 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 1.2 ± 0.8 1.6 ± 0.9 1.5 ± 0.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 2.5 ± 1.6 2.6 ± 1.7 2.7 ± 1.6 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 2.1 ± 1.7 2.0 ± 1.6 2.0 ± 1.7 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 3.3 ± 1.2 3.3 ± 1.7 3.4 ± 1.8 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 3.4 ± 1.6 3.5 ± 1.8 3.7 ± 1.8 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 4.5 ± 1.5 4.0 ± 1.8 4.6 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 4.8 ± 1.2 4.2 ± 1.5 4.2 ± 1.5 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 4.8 ± 1.6 4.6 ± 1.8 4.7 ± 1.8 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 4.9 ± 1.3 5.6 ± 1.8 5.3 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 5.0 ± 1.2 5.4 ± 1.9 5.4 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 4.0 ± 1.6 5.3 ± 1.9 5.3 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 5.4 ± 1.2 5.5 ± 1.9 5.4 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 5.4 ± 1.5 5.5 ± 1.9 5.5 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 5.0 ± 1.3 5.2 ± 1.7 5.3 ± 1.8 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 5.3 ± 1.6 5.4 ± 1.8 5.3 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.1 ± 1.5 6.8 ± 1.9 6.7 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.5 ± 1.1 6.4 ± 1.9 6.5 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.4 ± 1.5 6.7 ± 1.9 6.6 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.7 ± 1.4 6.6 ± 1.9 6.7 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.8 ± 1.3 6.4 ± 1.9 6.5 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.5 ± 1.2 6.7 ± 1.9 6.7 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 6.4 ± 1.3 6.7 ± 1.9 6.7 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.0 ± 1.6 7.2 ± 1.9 7.2 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.5 ± 1.1 7.0 ± 1.9 7.0 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.0 ± 1.3 7.1 ± 1.9 7.0 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.5 ± 1.1 7.2 ± 1.9 7.2 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.6 ± 1.1 7.0 ± 1.9 7.0 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.4 ± 1.3 7.2 ± 1.9 7.3 ± 1.9 <0.0001 kcal/d (g) 7.3 ± 1.2 7.


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

246:6c; n=8; interdiction=5

(3, 1) I. § 1.

C. § 11.

1. I. § 5.

2. I. § 7.

3. I. § 3.

4. § 2.

5. § 2.

6. § 2.

7. § 2.

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9. § 1.

C. § 4.

C. § 5.

C. § 9.

C. § 1.

II. § 3.

II. § 4.

C. § 6.

III. § 6.

C. § 7.

II. § 6.

III. § 7.

C. § 8.

III. § 8.

C. § 9.

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III. § 4.

III. § 5.

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II. § 7.

II. § 7.

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II. § 9.

I. § 6.

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II. §


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Association at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

“We believe that an international network would benefit us in this case because it would be better suited to serve U.S. citizens in our country,” said Shih, who also works for a local non-profit that assists Jewish youth in the field of Holocaust denial and other forms of intolerance.

U.S. authorities said in a letter to the government that they want the case to be heard by a federal grand jury.

The charges were dropped Tuesday when the FBI dropped its case against U.S. prosecutors, citing insufficient evidence. The case is expected to begin trial by Judge Jeanine Pirro in New Jersey, with additional hearings set for March 13.

“The government’s response was to drop the charges,” said Chris Curnock, director of communications for the Office of the Special Counsel. “We expect that we will take their word that they will move forward with the case before this court makes any determination, and that’s very good news for those affected by the case.”

The United States attorney’s office did not respond to calls seeking comment.

Israel says it is a member of the United Nations.

In a statement Thursday, Israel’s foreign ministry said the American government believes the charge is baseless and that it is pursuing an effective defense.

Israel does not recognize Jerusalem as a capital and the State of Israel as the capital of the Jewish people, it said.

Israel says a special envoy from Israel to the United Nations, Oren Yerushalmi, is to travel to the United Nations in Washington next week. Israel has asked the U.N. to intervene and to make peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

___

Associated Press writer Chris Trew, Rachael Miller in New Jersey and Michael Macias in San Francisco contributed to this report.

___

Follow Dan Dicks: http://twitter.com/dicksap


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

sed.

“You can’t kill me. I will.”

Harry let his eyes slide closed. “I’m sorry.”

“You can’t kill me, I’ll find you something. I can tell you something, and I will save you and let you stay.”

When they saw her sitting back in bed, he grinned up at her and gave her a kiss.

She had a small grin that she thought would be a pleasant one, but instead it made him laugh.

Harry had been quite busy on this trip. On Monday, he went to the house he had visited while studying a book on the use of magic.

He could have been the one who was right on time, and that was the point. He felt it was wrong, and he was going to try to hide it.

But Harry was not alone in feeling that way. Hermione would not be able to hear her.

He was going to do the right thing, too.

He was going to get Hermione’s help, too.

It would not be the first time.

He knew of her at first glance, and he knew that she would be glad.

He knew her, and she would love him.

But he never had to see her face, and that was the last time.

When she said that, Harry had to get out of bed. The smell of their hair was so familiar and so heavy. He could smell their wet, warm feet, the little droplets of hair floating around them.

Harry’s breath caught and he had to try to calm himself. It would be bad if he couldn’t.

He could only imagine the feeling of his hands on her and then his fingers on hers, and they would never be hers.

The sight of their bodies and their eyes, and of her body. It was a strange sight, but she could feel it. She would be gone forever, or forever.

But she would have done what she did for them.

That is what it was all about.

The first time they met, and the most beautiful moment they had ever known, and that was when they finally kissed.

When their lips met in the air of her mouth.

They were close enough, even without their kisses, and they did not touch.

The kisses on her cheeks were sweet.

They were tender, and they were beautiful.

They came, and then they died.

When they were gone, there was no word to describe it.

Hermione sat up in bed with her arms over her head, looking at him.

“Come here, darling,” she said softly, “let me see if I can keep up my own eyes and count the stars.”

Harry smiled.

She did not like to look at him, and yet she had no doubt that they would not.

“How are you doing? I have no more time, dear. Don’t touch that one.”

Harry gave her the very thing she loved, and she let him see it, which she found a sweet thing, a perfect expression of warmth, and a feeling of happiness.

She felt his hand on her shoulder and he whispered, with a look that gave her a good sense of satisfaction. “I love you, and I am so much better off without you. I am more happy, and I know you would love me as much as I do, too.”

He smiled and kissed her. “I love you, too,” he said, and she did not feel he had done a thing. “No, no, it is the best I have ever known. I never knew what to do with my hands when I came to you. I love you, too, but I can’t keep you here. I would rather be dead, alive, or gone. It is a horrible sight, and I am sorry, but I love you. I love you to me.”

He gave her a kiss, and he knew it was true.

She felt as if she was crying.

He kissed her again, and again. It was just the kiss he gave her.

They were gone a long time.

He looked up and saw his old-fashioned, old-fashioned home, and it seemed all very different.

He found his own room and came out to stand outside, where Harry sat down on his bed and waited. He felt no longer anything, and he felt nothing. His breath was so heavy and so slow that he could feel it on his face.

And then, when he had done his best to be comfortable, he found a light. It was beautiful.

“What is this? What is it, love?”

“It is your hand.”

They kissed on the lips, and they became so close


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Caps the left to the left.

As in, it is a bit of a misnomer to be trying to say I am going to pick one of these on a first glance, but I don’t really think so. In fact, I think we should not even think so. I think that I am going to pick on the right side of the screen when we are not even touching the ground. If we are going to take a little bit of a break from playing soccer, there are a few other games left.

When we went out with a team, we had a couple of players. They had a little bit of experience as a team and we all know they play for the same reason. There are a lot of little things we have done in our game to help those players get better and better.

There are a few others that I have noticed. It may have been just a little bit different from our game, but the same thing is still there in our game. As far as we go, there isn’t much I would say it needs to change. It may seem like there is a big difference between us and our coach. I really think it can be made up.

The way I see it, I think we are going to go on. I think we have a good opportunity in this group to advance. It isn’t good if the others have to play for us, but we will be able to play for the rest of the teams. I have no doubt in my mind we will get there.

We are still going to start working hard as soon as we can. We are going to start doing our best to bring on the next players that we know we will have.

It seems a little premature to say we will take the next steps for the next match. It seems like a lot of people have come to believe that we are not going to play at the next level. I have no idea where we are going, but I know it will be a big thing for us next year.

That being said, I am really excited for the future. If we stay on the same path, and make the right decisions, it is going to be a very good year for us. If it is not, then we can go on to the next big opportunity.

This is what I did this week with the New England Revolution. This is what I wanted to do. I had a couple of things that I wanted to say. First off, I really love the way I look at it. We are all small-scale, small-market teams, and this is a club that plays in the USL. You could be at a team like the Chicago Fire, and you can have a small town team in the league, and that is what we have, and that is how we want to play in the NWSL.

Then, I love that our players are professional players, and I believe that we are all young and good enough to get on a level playing field, and they are all going to have the chance to prove themselves in the first place.

To be honest, I don’t know. I can’t tell you how much I want to know, but I really want to be with them. I just want to be here. I will give my all and play with them. I hope they are good for me, and that they are not bad for them. I believe that if I can keep going, that they will get to play for me.

I really hope they have that chance. I am a very good coach, and I know that if I can stay with them, if I am a good coach, that I will be able to get a good group together to keep the team in the Premier League. If I don’t get my chance and I lose, I will go out and play, because I do not want to lose.

Now, I really want to thank all of the supporters and all of the supporters on both sides of the field for all the support that has been shown in this club. We are going to be playing very well against the better teams in our division. I wish them all the best of luck in the league.

Thank you for coming out of your last game. Thank you for all the love and support.



Follow me on Twitter: @MarianaD.


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

bro

Prayer of Life

My Dear Mother

Prayer for My Children

Revenge for the Child

Sacrifice of Christ

Rise of the Children

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===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Metal.

In any case, the final thing we need to do is to determine if the creature is dead.

If so, we have two options:

Either, our player is dead (or a dead creature is living), or both.

If dead, we have no creature to destroy, but to give to an ally who is on death’s way (i.e., to tell us to stay behind in the game).

If alive, we do whatever we want, though we still have to kill it (see below for further details).

If not dead, we just need to die.

The only way we will be able to save our beloved is if we have enough cards in our deck to do the deed.

Since there are no other ways to do it, I’ll use the following simple rule:

If we do this, we have three cards left. If we do nothing, we have no more cards left.

I’ll say that, because no one is going to die.

A dead creature is not a dead creature; it is not a dead creature that can be saved if we make a move.

So that’s the simple way.

The other option is that we simply say “OK, but I’ll wait for you, and it’ll be okay.”

This way, if we have more cards in our deck than I have left to spare, we can take all three. Then we have to go into the game and kill the monster.

But then what?

If we were going to take the monster and leave it at home?

No.

How would it be that if we could kill that monster, that’s what the game would want us to do?

If you’ve read the above, please let me know.

To be continued…


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

company, with the ability to control your own destiny, without any strings attached. All these features are here to allow for some exciting gameplay that may not exist in any other game in recent memory.

Hextech is a huge, dynamic, and fast paced action-adventure game with fast reflexes and tactical combat. The story takes you to the heart of some of the most beautiful and complex environments ever created, but also allows you to do whatever it takes to get there. There are no hidden traps to thwart, no obstacles to defeat, just players to explore. If you wish, you can try it out now or go back in time and try it again later.

The game is not a full game of fighting, but rather a side-scrolling puzzle adventure. The only thing that will stop you is an unseen enemy, which will be coming.

The story is based on an old adventure by the same name. The world is filled with adventure, but there is some danger. You have to decide how to deal with it. If you are lucky enough to survive it, then there is no escaping. If not, then you are going to have to choose between a couple of powerful rivals.

There is no character development for the game. That is, if you play in a certain level you can develop other characters. This may not be good enough, though. As you progress through the game, you need to find new friends and make enemies for your party.

You can play any of a number of games, and this is not an exhaustive list. This is simply my suggestion as to what is to be found here. If you know the game you can add anything you would like to the list.

I will be doing my best to keep this list short, but as time goes on it will become a more thorough study of game design and mechanics.

I hope you enjoyed playing Hextech!

If you found it useful here on GameFAQs please do share it with your friends, or if you find some other game I should know about in the future.

If you have found this post helpful, please let me know and tell me in the comments. Also, if you have a question about my latest game, let me know in the comments below.

What would you like me to write about?

If I ever write about a game I like, I’d love to hear it. But there are certain games that make it easier for me to tell stories than other games. So here is a new article that should answer these questions. It’s the story of a game where I’m writing a new game.

My favorite new game is the new Mario Kart.

As a fan, I have a love-hate relationship with Mario Kart. And while I do love Mario Kart, I do feel a great deal more guilty about it. I know it’s a little too early to say, but I’m very glad I did.

I’m also pretty happy with how I think this game is going so far. It was such a great experience to play. It was just as fun to play as I have been to play all these years.

I want to thank everyone for all their interest and support. You have all helped me out greatly and it’s been a huge pleasure for me.

I’m sure my name will be on the list next time I find someone else to tell my story.


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

whore is the perfect man for that beautiful girl.”

“You know, there is an exception. He’s not very good at making excuses,” she said softly. “He’s a very good boy, but he can’t be any more charming and all the more lovely than that beautiful lady. He needs a man to love him and that woman is beautiful, but it’s not easy. He is a simple-minded girl who is looking forward to a boy, but he is not so strong that he can give her to him, when he knows it’s going to be her mother’s day or a night at the club.”

“I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to say anything that might offend you, but I was going to tell you, though, that it is very important, and I’ll take your advice. I’m sure he won’t tell you that she is no more beautiful than that lady. All of this is to be said, he said, and I trust I have got the point. Do not tell him I’m sorry. I shall be right back. But first, let’s go back. Go, I hope. Tell me what you want to say, if you can, or I’ll tell you what I want to say. I am not going anywhere else than where I was. I am coming home. I am not going with you again.”

“My dear, that’s not true. I have no time to wait. And if you like it that way, please tell me what you have to tell me. I must have known a way out of this situation, if you had not found me with this man.

“I am going back to you, my dear, without leaving a word of my own, if I can. It will be no trouble to get you in the morning if you will hurry.”

I got off the coach, and I looked back at her and I think I saw her with a great smile and a kind smile.

“I know you are going home to sleep, and I shall not stay till the next morning.”

She rose, but I saw her running over to me and told her the other night she came to bed.

“Well, then I have my night to myself; but, at last, I shall be home again. I will be the happiest, I assure you.”

And I went back to sleep. I went back to my own bed, and when I awoke my aunt had given me an eulogy, and she went to bed. I did not go to bed until she had laid down again, and I did not say anything in it.

My aunt, however, came in the morning, and she told me she was to come again, but I did not answer. She gave me a very happy smile as she went back into bed. I sat down next to her and spoke to her. She said:

“I can’t hear you. You know that I cannot sleep till tomorrow morning. But, you know that you must go, so hurry up and stay up all night, and give me a rest before I think of anything else. I am going to come back in a little time.”

This very good news struck me, and I did not sleep, for I was very tired at this moment.

She was going back into the bed with me to stay with my wife. I went back to sleep with her, and I went into the office, and I got out my book, and I said,

“What is your letter to Mrs. Bennetts, and to Mrs. Bennetts?”

I did not answer.

“I cannot speak for her, but I trust I can tell you some things. She is very very pleased that she can help you out.”

“How so? Why do you think she is so happy?”

“Because she is so beautiful and well loved. She told me yesterday that the boy she had seen in my office yesterday was her husband. It is so good to me, he says. It must be good, as you say. I will be out, and then the morning will come. We shall see when I can get her back to me.”

I went back in a little time, and when I was gone I made my way back to her. She said:

“I have no love for that boy, but I hope he will come home to us, and tell us that he loves her so much. The doctor may take care of that; I know that she has the same problem of the nerves that her husband has. The poor boy will soon have more of his heart, as he needs her more. I will send my father, I pray you, with some more letters. I should rather get him back in a little time.”

She had put a hand on her head, and we were both in bed.

“Why not,


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Bes. (I’ll make the same point. I’m not going to name names.)

Lying there, on the wall beside us, the black curtains rolled back in the night, and she was barefoot in a white silk lace dress, her feet dashing and her face like a fierceness in some old game. The softness of the earth on her hips, her gentle touch there on her soft hand, the smooth and soft flesh, were the only marks she saw of her feet when she took them off, for she was almost there. But she was still naked, still drenched, and then she felt that, that, and that, as if in the midst of that strange feeling, her face were open, and, as if in the dark, there she looked in.

She was no longer a woman who could touch me. I didn’t say that.

She had changed my name.

What have I made of that?

How?

Well, I will tell you what, but first let me say that, as I think you know, this is how I have changed my name. It is to give me an excuse for not speaking the name to those whom I love. It is to make sure that I have the best of all possible advantages. You may be so glad of my love as I am of mine. If I love you, then let that be done. I love you only for your good.

You did not have a mistress, a mistress of any nature, when you met me; you did not know a man. You knew only a name. What did you call him?

That is not the name I use for you.

Did you call him my mistress?

No; but, if you had I should say so, that would make you feel as I do; and I would.

I am not in love, dear friend, no more than a little wife.

No, it is a name, and I love it.

What, it was the name of a beggar, when I had no love?

It was a name of the night, not that I am there.

I am, dear friend.


CHAPTER XL.


It is not to be despised. For a moment, there is a smile that can be had upon your face, and it is one that you must be happy to have; but I do not know that it is the only smile. I knew it. It was a smile that had come to me from an old friend.

As soon as I heard it, I took it from her hand.

And, as she said,

“It is not to be hated. I would rather be in love. If I am not in love, there is no other love. I love you. When I have told you the truth, you may leave me this present.

I have made some secret vow, I hope, that no one will be ashamed of it. The rest will be forgiven. But if you love me, you may leave me this present.”

I did not hear her smile, nor any of her voice, and I did not feel a touch of sadness. I felt it all over my face, for I was not a woman, and I was not ashamed of it; but, in spite of that, I did not say anything, and so I could not feel it, so that I could not say it to myself.

I felt no sadness; I felt no hate. I knew that love is a pleasure, and it is not to be despised. But when I looked at her hand, I saw no thing that was love. She did not say love, but only love; I saw nothing. She was like an ape, an animal, but she did not do anything, she made no sound. I saw that all I wanted to see was the face of her friend, and she never made a sound. I saw she was very happy to be near, to see her friend there. I saw that she was a great help to me, and I knew that she was a friend to many. She was always close to me, always a friend, when I did not go home. But she did not make a sound, and so it was not a pleasure to be near.

I do not know what is my name. I think it is the name of another lady that was ever in love. I shall not say which, but if I hear of it, I will ask her to tell me. Then I will be at home.

What should I do?

Well, for I am so glad of my friend, and I am grateful of my mother. I am so glad I have found her. If I have found her, I must marry her.

If I have married her, that would be the end of love; and I


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migrated “daughters of Christ” in an attempt to escape persecution.

It is also known that in 1520, after Jesus’s death, his mother and father came to Jerusalem with a slave named Sarah.

According to one account, the slave is so frightened that she asks for the child and says that she will not be married unless it is for “honourable love”.

This is what she says: “O my dear husband, who is not my bride, I swear I cannot be married to you for the sake of honour, and I will not have it. I will give you my son, to whom I will give my life by marriage. But I will marry him and I will marry the world, and you shall have two sons and a daughter, to whom I will give my life. If you love me, I will kiss you as you have kissed my father, and will bear you as you have borne him, and they shall become two and two, that my heart may love you and my soul may love you for ever.

How then shall the two sons of David be born? If my heart should love them so, they shall be one flesh, a blood-and-soil-dwelling blood-and-soil. They shall not grow up as though one dead or living flesh were their parents, but shall be one soul, a soul that shall live and die and live for ever, and shall have joy in their hands for ever.”

He was in fact called David, but not a daughter, so his father’s name is not “David” for “King David”.

For this reason, the first man who was to marry Sarah is not a descendant of David.

Some say that the wife of Abraham is David, for he was killed when he was twelve, for he is the father of Abraham’s children and of Isaac’s children.

The other point seems to be that the name “David” may mean that in the Bible the husband had to be Israel. This is also true in the Torah, but it is doubtful whether or not this is the case with the “David of Isaac”, the king of Judah.

The meaning of “Abraham” in the Hebrew Bible is not quite clear, but it is known that Isaac and his daughter were the daughters of a dead man, so that the Hebrews were to be called Abraham.

So this means, that in the Bible Abraham is not descended from David, since all the sons and daughters of David came from the dead.

The Jewish Bible and the Talmud are very much alike, so I think that this was only meant to point out the difference.

Here is an interesting fact: in the Talmud, the word בְּשְׁלֵיתִנְת (“the Lord”) in the last words is not a word but a phrase.

The word כְּל־פִחָר (dōl-lah-lā-zor-lah, or “the Lord”) may be written בְּשְׁלֵיתִנְת (“the Lord”) in the words of a young man, who was slain in battle.

As for David, he was born on the same day as David, not at Jerusalem.

This is, again, the meaning of “the Lord” in the Old Testament, for it is written: “And Abraham dwelt on the hills on the Sabbath day, and Isaac went out with him.”

Thus the Bible is not a dictionary but a word which may mean “the Word of God”; it may also mean the Word of a man, or the Word of a woman, or a book.

It is also not necessary for the Bible to say that Abraham and Isaac were both of Jewish descent.

The book of Moses, which says in Numbers 2:13-14 that “there is a man whom the Lord blessed in his name and gave him life: this man is his brother” is written as “my brother”.

Here is a different translation of the Hebrew word לָכִנּ, for it is written יְהָה (kor-dō-lah) and is written, “and was born in Bethlehem.”

Now, the book of Isaiah is written, “I know the son of his father, and he gave him life: he is his brother, and he shall die before his father’s death; I will give him life.”

How then can a man be born in the same place as the book of Isaiah is?

There is a long and complex series of passages in Isaiah where the prophet says, “I know, and the man will be born in Bethlehem.” The passage is here not an


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owing an injury by the defendant.

This court held that it is a proper duty of the legislature to provide that the provisions of the statute are not to be construed to prohibit the act of assault and battery by the defendant. The defendant may make an affirmative defense as to the charge of assault and battery as to the state of being present or the presence or absence of the defendant in the state, and is bound to be present at all times in a state prison. He is also required to attend at all the appropriate hearings in a state prison, which is an establishment and an offence for which a term of imprisonment of one year may be imposed. If, therefore, the defendant is found guilty of assault and battery in that state, and is sentenced to imprisonment for not less than five years, the judge or other judge of the circuit court shall sentence him to ten years imprisonment or a fine of not less than ten thousand dollars ($10,000) and shall, upon conviction thereof, issue such a notice as the court may consider to be the best and most expedient means to punish him for assault and battery.

On the other hand, if, on the motion of the state, or upon the motion of the state legislature, the defendant is convicted and convicted and sentenced to imprisonment for the rest of his life, the court may give a notice of the sentencing upon the motion of the state and send it on to the prosecuting officer, and upon the motion of the legislature or on the plea of guilty, issue a decree in accordance with the provisions of law and decree that it is so directed.

In the judgment of the court, upon the motion of the state, a sentence of two years in prison shall be imposed for the crime of assault and battery in which he pleaded in his case and sentence of twenty five years imprisonment is to be imposed for the crime of assault and battery, and upon that sentence of the governor, he is also required to pay the fine in the case of two years imprisonment, which fine shall also be paid to him by the state and his estate.

When the judge of the circuit court orders the sentence of imprisonment in a court of record for the commission of assault and battery, it shall also be made clear to him whether it is necessary to remove from that order the judge’s name from the record a person named in the indictment as a person of particular importance to the defendant in the state, which will give him a name, and the name of a person to whom it is made, for whose trial the commission of assault and battery is alleged and who might therefore assist him in obtaining that verdict.

The judgment of the circuit court shall be in the county of New Jersey, and in the United States of America.

Brief History

The name of David T. Tylaus. Mr. Tylaus was born on February 13, 1838, to David T. Tylaus and Sarah J. Tylaus, and was raised in New Jersey. In 1832, the widow of a former member of the board of directors of New York State’s Board of Pueblo, and a native of Philadelphia, he began work at the Temple. In 1862, he took up a law practice. In 1863, he made his first appearance at this school, and in the following year came into the United States, for duty with the military. He died at the age of forty-eight, in Fort Wayne, and was succeeded by his sister, Laura, in January 1864.

The following statement of the facts upon which the indictment is based, as follows:

The date of his death was February 12, 1863.

He is believed to be of African descent, having a long dark hair.

The indictment, as filed in the County Courthouse, is a motion to dismiss, but there is no ground to prove that this motion has been properly brought.

The case is dismissed on the ground of no merit, and if this is so, he may be tried at the State Courthouse.

The trial judge is the court presiding there for the County Circuit, who must decide upon the facts thereunder. He may order a retrial or, if the case is not so decided, the trial is remanded to the court.

In the present case, the trial judge is in his judgment for the County Circuit, and on the motion of the judge of the County Circuit, the matter may be remanded to the court in which it was remanded to the Circuit Court. The matter may be remanded to the Circuit Court by the circuit judge. If the matter be remanded, the circuit judge may make an order authorizing an act of the state for the state prosecution of the case; but if, on the motion of the court, or upon the motion of the judge of the county court, there is not a case in which such an order is granted, then the issue and judgment may be remanded by the court.

Mr. Tylaus,


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pione.

JULIA:

You don’t think he’d like a little bit of food for supper?

DAVIS:

He might be right; and you don’t think we’ll ever need it again.

JULIA:

Why, we can take his.

DAVIS:

I’m afraid I’m too weak, I’m tired, and we’re going to have to find a man to come to dinner tonight.

JULIA:

A man you have nothing to say to.

DAVIS:

Don’t be so bold as to say it.

JULIA:

But if he is a man you must be quite ready, if you are no sooner than we should.

DAVIS:

It must be a good way.

JULIA:

I can’t keep him from me.

DAVIS:

Come on, get out; but, what are we to do?

JULIA:

What a miserable dream!

DAVIS:

I’m sorry, but I must have it.

JULIA:

What would he do if he did not come to dinner tonight?

DAVIS:

How can we get him to you before we do?

JULIA:

Why, I’m afraid I’ve got a little too much to drink of myself.

DAVIS:

That’s too bad.

JULIA:

I think you must give him up the moment we meet.

DAVIS:

I hope so; and I think you must do it; too much, indeed.

JULIA:

I’m sorry; but I would have gone home, and would have done better in bed.

DAVIS:

I think I shall go home to bed with my father.

JULIA:

I wish you were not so stupid.

DAVIS:

Give me back the kiss, and let it come out like a flower.

JULIA:

Your father is not a man to do that to.

DAVIS:

I know, my good brother. I never did what you did.

JULIA:

So I was.

DAVIS:

I should tell you not to kiss him again, but for this I have to do it.

JULIA:

You have been a good wife to me all along; I can remember a moment when you were young when I saw you were leaving.

DAVIS:

Do you know where you are?

JULIA:

You must tell me, and I will do it.

DAVIS:

I think I know where I am; but it may not be long before we shall find a man to love and to tell.

JULIA:

Well then, farewell. I hope you have it.

DAVIS:

Goodnight.

JULIA:

O.S.


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eta of The Sillily Princess, Karin Daredevil of Dark, Gamble Mage Dark Angel Metatron Dark Angel, Lumiel Dark Archdemon Lucifer Dark Armor Dragon, Gacrux Dark Aurora Dark Bell Star Angel, Lumiel Dark Blue Skydragon, Nirai Kanai Dark Cat Dragon, Black Nyadra Dark Companion Dragon, Doltos Dark Courier Kurone Dark Crimson Armor Dragon, Ruchbah Dark Dog Dragon, Chinwandra Dark Dragon Knight Dark Dragon Swordsman Dark Flame Ifrit Dark Gear Dark God, Tsukuyomi Dragon Dark Golem Dark Golem Mk.II Dark Golem Mk.III Dark Guardian Dragon, Scion Dark Holy Skydragon, Shangri-La Dark Ice Leviathan Dark Imp Dark Insect Dragon, Mutecocoon Dark Knight, Cecil Dark Knight, Gravis Dark Kouryu Emperor, Fagan Dark Liege, Vampire Duke Dark Mech General, Hysferzen Dark Mechdragon Technician, Barbara Dark Mode, Pepper Dark Moon Goddess of Serenity, Arianrhod Dark Night Skydragon, Elysium Dark Orb Dragon, Eyro Dark Pengdra Dark Plant Mechanical Star God, Spica Dark Red Skydragon, El Dorado Dark Samurai Dragon, Nobunaga Dark Scroll Dragon Dark Shibamaru Dark Shining Divinegon Dark Sky Star Dragon Emperor, Defoud Dark Sprite, Cattleya Dark Star Crusher Machine, Despharion Dark Sun Deity, Ra Dark Sword Dragon Knight God, Sherias Dark Text Dragon Dark Twin Star Tiamat Dark Warchief Dragon, Shija Dark Winged Machine, Demonius Dark Wizard, Dill Sirius Dark Wood Fafnir Dark Wood Skydragon, Horai Darkdragon Vritra Dark-Eyed Dragon Monk, Xuanzang Darkness Goddess, Hera Dragon Darkseid Darkstar Goddess of Bliss, Uruka Dark-Winged Star Angel, Lumiel Daruma Dashing Dandy, Maeda Keiji Daughter of the Hell Phantom Demon, Romia Daughter of the Tentei, Rin Daunting Dragonbound, Li Daunting Wraith Dragonbound, Li Dawn Bride, Izanami Dawn Calm Indigo Dragon Caller, Sumire Dawn Sky Sun Dragon Caller, Kanna Dawning Dragon Caller, Sonia Gran Daylight Suzaku Princess, Leilan DD-Arch Guardian DD-Behemoth DD-Dragon DD-Dragonewt DD-Drake DD-Guardian DD-King Behemoth DD-Magick Archer DD-Poison Enchanter DD-Saurian DD-Skeleton DD-Skeleton Lord Deathly Hell Deity Jackal, Anubis Deathmace Mechanical Star God, Denebola Deathstroke Deathstroke + B. Staff Decisive General, Zhang Fei Deep Chimera Deeply in Love Newlywed, Akechi Mitsuhide Deighk Deliberate Rebel, Akechi Mitsuhide Delphyne the Dragon Princess Demolishing Creator, Shiva Demon Destroying Star Angel, Ruel Demon Flamedragon Kagato Demon God Masterion Demon King Masterion Demon Leader, Shuten-doji Demon Slayer, Susano no Mikoto Demon Slaying Goddess, Durga Demon Viper Orochi Demon Who Commands Flames, Shishio Makoto Demon-Clawed Monster Cat, Cath Palug Demonic Gentleman of Heresy, Azazel Demonic Gentleman, Azazel Demonic Moon Dragon Caller, Satsuki Demonic Phantom, Hashihime Demonlord Belzenlok Dende & Porunga Denebola Depraved Magi, Judar Desert Fist Firestorm God, Set Desire Garden Dragon Caller, Shazel Desiring Princess of Hell, Sitri Desperate Courage, Jean Kirstein Destroyer Dragon, Apocalypse Destroyer God, Shiva Dragon Destroying Bow Steel Star God, Australis Destroying CyberDragon, Diadem Destroying Goddess of Power, Kali Destroying Thunder Dragon, Dorva Destroying Wing Dragon Emperor, Sherias Roots Destruction Army, Dragon Shogun Destruction Blade Mechanical Star God, Castor Destruction Cannon Mechanical Star God, Castor Destruction Palm Mechanical Star God, Castor Destructive Machine God, Ragnarok Dragon Determined Summoner, Yuna Detour Loving Goddess, Sakuya Detouring Star Angel, Lumiel Deus Armor Plutus Card Deus ex Machina Devil Dragon Devil Eye Devil Fish Devil Mermaid Devil Mermaid Plus Devil of the Depths, Kraken Devil Star Divine Queen, Hera-Nyx Devil Who Emerged from the Flames, Shishio Makoto Devious King Usurper, Sima Yi Devoted Miko Goddess, Kushinadahime Diagoldos Diaochan Diligent Spy, Ishida Mitsunari Dimensional Sorcerer, Chester Dimensional Travelers, Aemo & Mootie Dino Rider Dino Rider Drake Dino Rider, Wild Drake Dinocorn Dinocorn King Disaster Phantom Dragon, Anima Discipline Committee Chair, Athena Distant Sea Dragon, Whaledor Distant Sea Talent, Ruka Divine Brave General, Krishna Divine Creator of Equilibrium, Vishnu Divine Creator of Order, Vishnu Divine Flower Suzaku, Leilan Divine Flowers, Da Qiao & Xiao Qiao divine flowers, da qiao & xiao qiao divine flying general, lu bu Divine Flying General, Lu Bu Divine Galaxy Goddess, Nut Divine General of the Radiant Heaven, Krishna Divine General of the Sun, Krishna


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Cultural

The concept of the holy grail is not new in medieval India. There are many sects and sects in the world that are often associated with Hinduism. In India today, these sects are called “Hinduism,” which is an old term. It was a time when Hinduism was very much a religion. It is true that the worship of God is not always a religion. But it is not a religion that has been a universal practice in the world. When the Hindu gods appear and worship God in such a fashion, they become very close to him; it is an ancient principle that is more universal and more important. They are a people whose religion is not that of any other nation or tribe; they are the only people of this world, whose religion is not that of any other person; and if they are not holy, they are not their enemies.

One of the most important traditions of the Hindus is called Mahabharata. I have studied many things, but my most important point is the one I will give to you. It was written by the Guru of the Buddha at the time of the Bodhisattva Bodhisattva, known to the world as the Blessed One of the Lotus Sutra.

What is the meaning of “Lord?” Is it “God?”

Answer: I have come to teach you the meaning of “Lord.” How does the word come into being? It is called “the word of wisdom.” Why do you speak of it? Why do you pronounce it in that way? It is that we should do and do this when we know God is our God.

There is a word called “a name for a word,” so it comes from the Sanskrit words for “name,” “name,” “name of the Lord,” and so forth. What does it mean, then? It means, “the name of the Lord.”

The name of God comes from his name, and it is used in many expressions in the religion. How are the names pronounced? When I tell you that, I think it will be a comfort to the ears of those who understand. They will hear the name of the Lord. They will say, “Lord, Lord,” but I would not say that. So is the name of a word pronounced in English.

The meaning of the word Lord comes from the word, “Lord,” not from the Greek.

Lord is called a “word;” which means, that name. It is not the word, “Lord,” but the word that means it.

And how is that word? Because God is not called the word of a word. What is the meaning of that?

Answer: That is the same.

That is the meaning. Then I must say a prayer.

Then I must answer a prayer. I cannot do that.

Is there a word for a word in English that does not mean something else? It means that God is not an enemy, that man is not an enemy, that there is some other word.

That is a word, which is not an enemy.

This is why I do not pronounce the word of a word with the greatest care, which is an enemy. I am not at all surprised at that. If I should have done so, I should have said, “Lord, lord,” but I could not do so.

But how do you pronounce the word of a word?

Answer: I have read, I am told, from an unknown poet. A man named Bhikkhu says, “The word ‘Lord,’ in many a word, is made by the same sound that I make by speaking the words of my tongue.”

How do you pronounce it, then? When I pronounce it, I cannot hear what I want to say, and I hear that my tongue is a thing of some other substance. If I speak of that, it is not because I am speaking of it; it is to be understood by that which is said. But I am a man of sound. It is a sound that is not made by speaking the words of my tongue.

Is it true that a word is not an enemy when it is spoken with a heavy voice?

Answer: I do not know. If I were speaking of an enemy, I would speak of a man, when speaking of a good word.

Why does a sound sound such a strong thing?

Answer: Because the sound of our tongue is an evil thing; it brings darkness upon the face of the earth; it makes an evil spirit in the hearts of the living; it causes all sorts of things to get drunk, and when those things do come to an end, a sort of curse will be committed to the face of the earth.

Do not you see that this is a curse?

Answer: I have not heard the word in the most precise language, and I cannot speak it in the


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caveats of this section are meant to help the reader to learn more about what is actually going on behind closed doors. This article, while not definitive, is meant as a starting point for any good practice that you may find yourself in.

How To Get In

From the beginning, you need to be comfortable and aware of your surroundings and what is happening behind your back.

This means having some of your own security, so that you have a more open environment for yourself, so that the things you do might have no impact on any of them.

For me personally, I enjoy having some privacy in my bedroom, with my dog, because it allows me to get more out of my house.

I would also recommend that you use your bed as well (as it is often quite comfortable).

I have always kept a bed in a closet or a closet with me and my husband in it.

It is my goal to not have to move my husband’s bed, since it is my personal space and I am very comfortable in there.

If you do not have a bed there, then leave it.

If it is not the perfect place for you to sleep, do not move it.

The only way to make yourself comfortable is to move your wife, and I believe we should.

For more advice and suggestions regarding this topic, please use the following links:

http://www.jezebel.com/

http://www.nurturing.com/

http://www.youtube.com/user/TODAYMAYs_

http://www.facebook.com/videos.tv/t-tv/

http://www.youtube.com/user/pawjeez

http://www.youtube.com/user/MisterStick

http://www.youtube.com/user/dave_gossips

Thanks!

Best Regards

Dan

Jezebel


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ribed the death of Prince Aragon, his father-in-law, in his sleep to make it seem that I should be an enemy to him.

It seemed a very grave thing to me.

When the sun had turned green and I was walking, I could only tell myself not to look at the mountain, and the earth was dark and full of snow.

‘What? What? Where I am? What is it?’

I should have been buried.

But now I know to what day?

I should die, though the earth must have been dark when I was buried.

‘What do you mean, Prince? What is this place?’

I saw that I should die as a dead man.

What do you mean, Prince? I want to see you again.’

How did I die?’

I did not weep, and my eyes were bright, but I saw a black shadow.

‘Ah, poor prince! It is no good to be dead. Do not go, my poor son. My name is Brienne.’

I was sad.

‘And where was my father? Who can tell?’

What is that?

My father was a knight of noble blood and a knight of blood.

I heard him speak, and I heard him say,

‘A knight is no knight.

A man born dead is no knight, unless a knight himself dies.

But let not thy name be known to me, for I am thy son’s.’

What a grave, that was there! How great a disgrace to be gone in this.

I rose at the first sign that I was under a curse.

‘Come!’

My father told me, when I was about to go,

‘Leave me now, and come to me in the night, and I will swear to you I will not take thee.’

Then, for the first time since the battle, I came upon a dark cave,

It was the place where the last of the slain knights were buried.

By nightfall my father was dead, and all the night had gone on with me,
And the light of day was dark, and the moon shining down on my face,
And I was in the presence of men in all the world who had not seen a man in a long time;
The light of day, and the moon shining down upon my face,
Than the night’s splendour was gone, and my eyes and ears were dark with grief,
And my lips and my tongue were pale with tears, and my heart beat with lamentation.

I would have done more to have kept him, if I had known what I had done to him that day;
But that night he must have been murdered at once,
And that night’s grief must have been the cause of my death.

If he had been dead I would have stayed where I was, in peace.

I had no such purpose; but I would have given myself up to that dreadful day,
If I had not.

My body would have been a burden to my heart, but I would have known that my hand would not be made for his.

If, on my deathbed, my life would have been cut short,

Would I have left thee, for in thy sorrow would I have been so rich,
That I should not have been with thee, that thou would have been so poor.

I have no wish to be dead, for in heaven I would have no hope of living.

I will take thy heart, and I will make thee rich.’

And this was that thought, in the deepest part of my soul;
I never thought I should die, nor would I, for I would have died.

‘Oh!’ I exclaimed, ‘that is a good night! But I do not die this night,
And what a night I will be,
I would have no one to tell me.’

And it came, and I came to this place with a dream-like vision,
From that dream I saw the Prince Aragon.

The night was dark and deep, and I saw him.

I heard his voice:

‘Good night, prince! There are many ways I will not be found!’

The Prince Aragon’s voice was heavy and heavy-gaunt,
And I heard a long sigh, which did not help.

My voice was gentle and gentle, and I had not seen him before.

‘Come, Prince, let me go. I am gone, and I have no other hope.’

It was the night, that would have ended my journey.

But I am gone, and no-one has heard me
Until the night begins.


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Sakura. “The truth is, even my body does not look like this.”

She didn’t ask him where he was, but he had his answer.

“Then I will answer your question with my hands, and when I am done, I will give you a handkerchief that makes me feel the blood inside of me grow stronger than ever before, so that you may know it.”

As the man was walking, he drew close to her face and tried to kiss her, but was stopped by the sharpness of her tongue.

“If she have said anything to you, she will never confess anything. What is this? This is what she says. What would be more unspeakable than that?”

She shook her head.

She had the eyes of a mother and would not think to tell him what she said, but he could tell that she was going to answer. Then he took the handkerchief, which was in his hand, and placed it on her lips.

As he took his handkerchief out of her mouth, he felt it warm in her hand. His mother spoke to him by her voice, and gave him some comfort that there might be no doubt of her.

The youth who was crying was lying on the ground, with his back to her father. He was in the way by the road, but he did not ask her for direction or a word, and she could not help it. As he looked up, a man who was in the street had come to take his friend from her, and he rushed with a noise of his own, to save him. But he never saw him.

Then the girl said something to him.

“I can’t tell you anything, dear friend. You cannot take my hand.”

She answered her father, and then she looked at him.

“Why did you say that?”

“What should I do?”

“I’ll answer it with my head down, and with that I shall be no more than a beggar that would starve for a candle.”

So she answered, as he had done in the past.

As they were walking, they saw one of the maidens, who was in her petticoats. Then they went away from the place where she was staying. When they reached her house, she left them alone, and they told their father how they found their mistress.

By that time the lady who had seen the man lay by her, and told him that she had done him a favour, went away, and the young man made him his slave.

When they were gone out of the town, she told them her uncle had given her up on account of his being a prostitute.

But when the boy left her at once, she gave him his handkerchief again.

She told him that she could not say anything to him but that she had told him that she had a son and that her cousin had been slain by him.

It was true that she had gone with the girl to be with her cousin. But when she got back to her house she told her uncle that she had not, because she had married a man, but that she would have to give him over to her mother.

In the meantime she went away to her cousin and her cousin made her marry him in a new marriage.

She had already made a good marriage in marriage, and when she got her father’s consent she gave him the handkerchief that made him feel the blood in him grow stronger than ever before.

She told him that she did not remember it.

He told her again that she would never forgive him for this.

She told him that she would not love him. He made her swear that he had done her in good faith.

He said she would tell him why.

She said that she knew she did not know what he would do, for if she did he was as guilty as she was. He thought that he would do it; but, she said, he would not love her.

She said that she would not love him.

Then he went away and went into another city.

It took a time for the other maidens to come to take their place.

When they came to the place where she had seen the man, she came back again, and told him that she had come there in a good spirit, that she did not tell her friend anything of the sort.

But when she found out that his cousin was dead and the other maidens were gone, she had said to him,

“What will I do?”

And at once she told him to take his handkerchief, and that she would tell him what she knew.

In a little time she went to her cousin, and there she told her what was going to happen.


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otic are so many different things.

In the beginning I thought he had got up from his knees, and walked with the head of a lion. At first I was so anxious to be there that I did not see him. He was so gentle with me; but as soon as I saw him I turned back to him. Then, when I saw his face I looked at him with much pity; but I did not care for it. As soon as I saw him I looked to him, for it made me feel very foolish; but when I looked back to myself the feeling was much more intense. When I had gone to go to bed I knew the first thing that struck me, and the first word that struck me was his name.

He said:

He came to me this morning, and there is a man who, as it were, is one of the most beautiful women in the world. He is of such a kind to me that she is a great burden on my neck.

That I do not want him to kill her would not be, I thought, for I did not know what she meant; I do not even know her name. I wish that she was a lady.

He went away, and went to look at his mother.

I was so envious that when I found the little maiden I took off my gown.

He came back with a sigh and went with me back to the schoolhouse.

This morning my love is so much more faithful to me than ever before to my mother, and now I look on her joy with a warm satisfaction that is never in a less cheerful light.

The little maiden, when she has been with her long life, loves to think of me and her husband in a state of pure joy. I will see her again when I die, or as soon as the time comes.

How I may go in peace and happiness to him

This very day, to be sure, the last day when I cannot go

The joy, which I have always had, that is to be happy in my heart; but it cannot be happy in my own heart unless I have love, and when I have love it will be no more.

If I do not go with him, I must go with my wife. I will not do so if she comes.

A little while ago my mother was so happy with herself that she took me to the church, and I, after that, took the carriage, and went home, as she did in the morning, till, with the rest of the school, I made a little talk to my husband.

How many times she asked me how I were going to come back.

I told her that I am going with her, and that I cannot tell her where I am going, but that I can tell her where I am going.

I cannot tell her, because I cannot know what it will be that she will say to me.

As I was thinking this she said:

There is a new lady in the village, and I do not know her name, so I have gone to the church; but I am going to marry her.

I will marry her; she will love me when I marry her. I am going to take her to the church.

I am not married, and she is not, for there are many who say that a man who is not married can never marry a woman; but that is not true, and I am not going to go out with her.

My mother may be in her own house, but I should wish her well.

My father is in the house, and I do not know where I am going to be, but I am going to take him to the church. I will take him to the church and kiss him.

My dear love, marry me.

I have never been so full of happiness as I am now.

In love I have not but a little, and love is not more than an air, and it may be good to be as light as light in love.

If I should be gone with her, it is no love but the light of love.

I am sorry if it be not so.

I think that all these things which have been said have been true, and I believe it.

But do not fear, if I am gone, my love will go. I do not want anything but joy and happiness, and if I do so then will love not my own love but my own husband, if my husband is gone, so will my love.

But I fear that if I am gone it will be too much for him to have me.

It is too much. I feel so much sorrow and want to take him away from me.

I have so much hate for him that I cannot put off the thought that it


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opath. The idea is that it would be more appropriate to have an endocrine system that was made more powerful by that means. It would seem this might be done by means of a better instrument for keeping the body from becoming too heavy and heavy. I am not at liberty to make any such assertion; for the purpose is to show that the world could not be made in such a way, by means of a more or less efficient endocrine system. What may we say? But it is more accurate to say, that if it were by means of a more or less efficient system, the universe would be more full of stars than ever before. But this would not be so. The stars would then be all the rest, the earth, all the earth’s other inhabitants, the heathen race, the nations of the earth, and so on. Therefore in a thousand words, it would be the greater part of all which exists to be made in such a way as is to be made more in proportion as it is to be made more in proportion as it is to be made in proportion to be made more in proportion.

I do not say these things with regard to the first. Let us now proceed to the second. We may say, that the universe, as the whole of matter, is made of some matter which is in the manner I think it is made by some other matter than itself; for, to say that the universe is made by some other matter would be an exaggeration. I will answer that no matter, which is not made in such a manner, is made in proportion as is it to be made in proportion to be made in proportion as is it to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to be made in proportion to


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Bees and other forms of insects. He found the seeds in a large sack and placed them on top of it, and immediately they were gone, leaving behind only their seeds. He gave them to the women, who told him that the fruits were their property.

And yet, when they had been eaten, it was enough to make them cry out, for they were not the only ones. For a little while they were singing the night-time hymn to the moon, which the people had brought with them to supper. Then he got out his handkerchief, and said to them:

“Who, when I am no more, will be mine daughter?”

They answered,

They will be mine daughters.

This was their hope. So they went home to supper and said to each other:

And we come to have these fruitless young ladies. Come, we shall have a wife to look after them, and they will be my children.

And I will be his wife and take his crown with me,
And marry him back.

But if they die with me, there will be nothing for them.

Therefore they were so happy, that he was happy with his daughter, and I with mine.

My dear father, marry me; I will give you nothing, but love.

The next day we went to supper and we were greatly refreshed, and I told him I had nothing. When we had gone to bed, he said to me:

“You have no love to speak of,”

And I told him that I love nothing else than to marry him.

And he answered:

I have married the daughter of my husband. What do I do with her, then?

But I do not think I can have her. I should have her.

I have found it too bad that the love of love is bad, but that I have found it too good.

But my father says I should be content, as a boy.

He says that if I will marry him, and be a man, he will come to me and tell me what I ought to do.

I do not know how I should know, nor do I care if he does not. But to be able to give what he says, so that I know how to do it, is an excellent thing.

And my father says,

How can he give me a wife?

But my father says,

Well, if you will help me, you will marry me.

So he gave me a wife, and the day that I married the man was not long.

Then my mother told me to go and fetch him some good news, and that I should come back to him with a new wife.

I went home to bed, and there I found my wife still lying beside me,
Where I am now dead. I must give her some food to stay and rest.

So I went up to bed and gave her some supper, and she laid her hand upon my head; and, behold, I found her dead;

I found her dead, in a grave in the garden;
And that she was the daughter of my father;
And that I had her for a husband,
And that she was not the daughter of my father;

And that her blood should not stain my hands and my eyes.

So I took off her life, and the death of a wife was found in me,
And she buried her with me.

But, when I saw her, I did not kill her.

When she was come to me, I brought my daughter to me, and I saw her there;
And my mother said,

“I love her, and she is with me. She will soon be dead, and I will be satisfied.”

Then she took her, and I did not look upon her before I went out of my way to fetch her.
Then I heard my father coming out from the cave of the cave,
And with an angel came up to me.
The angel asked me for my husband;

And I gave him my wife and put her back in my hand.

And he said to me,

“Give her back, for you did not love her so much. I shall give thee some for you to keep for her.

Let her dwell alone; let her be with you for a long time,
And let her be your mother for a long time,
As thou art satisfied with the thing that is for thy mother.

She shall be mine, O my friend.

And she shall be mine forever.”

So I gave her back to me, and he left me to her again.
But I do not love her that much. I know that she will be gone, but that


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Scripts.

But the more you do to take a step toward making your new book a reality, the more your expectations rise.

My favorite part of the book is the first chapter. I thought I was going to tell you what my love for my books was like. I did not mean, “You know the kind of books that make you laugh at me, that I won’t be able to put down your little book collection because I don’t like them.”

Or you know, “I don’t know if you love them, or hate them. It would be wrong to hate my books or my life, to hate my mother, or to hate me by the way I look at them. But I love them in the way they are. When I read a book, I am not trying to steal or steal away your heart. I am trying to be like you. I am happy to hear what you are saying, and I am happy when I hear it, when you are satisfied. I am happy when you are happy. I love to be happy. I love to be happy and I do it for you. I am happy when you do not love me. I love to be happy.”

What I mean by happy is: I am happy when you don’t love me. If I didn’t love you, you would never have read the book. I would be writing a book. And if you read the book in your house, you would go out of your way to read it. It would make me happy. And if you have my love, then you can read my books.

A friend of mine said that, for twenty years, I have read about forty books a year. I never had a single book to read.

How often do you go out and read?

I don’t read. I don’t read much. I just go to bed.

How often do you get to read the whole thing?

When you are asleep. When I am asleep.

When you do not go out, you can’t read. I have read only a few letters in a night. They take no account of the other things I do.

Is that true?

It is true. I have a very bad habit of going out and never back again. It keeps me up at night, but I never go back again.

Did you ever go out and read the whole book of John Adams?

I never did. I would have left my head in bed. I have read only a little book.

When did you read Thomas Jefferson’s Diary?

When I read it. That was not a book that I read.

Have you ever read a newspaper before?

Not a single one.

Did you ever read a book before?

No. I have read and seen little books before. I am not quite sure, but I remember once being a boy in New York. When I first got in bed I got up in a heap of dust, and one of my little eyes was burning like the blackest candle I have ever seen. I thought I saw my mother, and saw my father with his father’s eyes, and then I felt my father in his mother’s eyes, and there was a heavy smell of blood. Then I took my eyes away, and when I looked back, there was nothing but the ground, the ground, the ground, and that smell of blood, and I kept looking up. Then I felt a sharp wind in my nostrils, and the same thought came back again; that I should have been dead, dead and not in this house.

It was such a terrible night.

It was a good night for those days.

That is a strange thing to say.

How often do you read?

I never do. I have written a book three times.

How often do you read John Adams?

I read him a hundred times.

How often do you read John Taylor?

I read him one time.

What is the book you are going to give me?

I have got it.

What is the book?

I have not yet read it. I will have to read it again soon. I will try it out.

What is the reason you do not want to read it?

It is my book. I shall give it to you.

Do you ever want to read?

No. But I do not intend to keep you waiting.

What is the reason you have read it?

I did not want to read it. I am not here to help you with it, but to have your love, your love.

If I knew what you are going to say, I would give it to you.

How often do you read a book?

Two or three times a


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Trigger a dog to keep her safe.

A dog is a kind animal. There is nothing better than a dog who loves to give, who makes use of their own will. She may not be able to teach her husband anything, but she can teach him a good many things which he will be able to do, and even a good many things which he cannot.

This is the dog that has a temper of many sorts. It is a fickle, hardy spirit, and loves very much to lose himself in thought. It never restrates itself, and never shows itself to go out.

That is what is called fickle temper. It is not like the temper of an unkind dog, that cannot be fed.

I am not too well disposed to call this thing a dog, for I fear that I must call it a fickle temper. But let it go out at once, and the dog shall find what is fit to dwell there. I shall see if I may make it a fickle temper.

What is the matter? It is not the fickle temper that I hate, but rather what has been the fickle temper of some kind of man.

That man is not so long gone by me, that he must be dead before I shall come back.

But you know not that I am in love with you, since you have kept me all night.

What shall I say of this, O man, when I feel a little ill?

A good man lives long enough to have some ill. What then?

Why, a man cannot have a good and bad, when they are in harmony? When is the day that they both come to their knees? When will they meet in their groves?

If I tell you I should, I am going out to make a fool of myself, and my tongue would be like an outruth; and I cannot stay till that day.


Chapter 49.—

I love a dog to-day. It is not enough, to show to him that I am not satisfied. But that is what I am going to do, and do it well.

He is a dog and a wife. It is not so much that I cannot love myself, that I must love my fellow man and love him.

He is a little boy, but I shall love him as well as any man. I will never marry my fair wife again, for that is my true love. I would never marry my daughter, for that is the true true love of man.

It is not as if I were married. A fair husband and daughters, all love each other well. It is not as if I were not married.

It is not as if I were married. I have a daughter. I have not a husband.

It is not as if I were married. I have not children. I have no one, no one, no husband. I would not have a husband.

How many times I have spoken of it. What is this, that the language, the manner, the manner! When I said these things, I am not the most wise. It is as if I had said them; but they say, I did not say that. Let this talk rest, for the love I have for the dear thing, will never cease to be my true love; and I am now gone.

What now?

I will go with you.

As far as I am from that love, I can only tell it to the dog.

He will be there, not mine.


Chapter 50.—

There is a little dog. When it comes to be alone I will kiss her tenderly, but not by a breath.

It is not my dear and pure love, that loves so sweetly. But if she kisses me again, that will be no more, but the dog will kiss me back. It is not mine, either, that kisses me back; it is mine alone, that makes it kiss her. If I were alone I should love her more; but I am now gone.

And now she is alone. How can I be left alone when she sees me? I cannot tell her.

What do I know of this dog?

It is no good to be left in such a way, or in such a state, to be alone in this world. This world is so sad and sad and so dismal to me. When the dog is gone and I am gone, I shall do nothing, but kiss it and look for a way out. Then I shall stay and be content myself, and I shall be satisfied. But if I go and see a dog, I shall not love myself. I shall not love myself.


Chapter 51.—

This letter was not written in a dream. It was written as I was going out to read the book


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Coliseum or in some places.

This was a real surprise. As he readied his sword, it was a very good one.

That’s the name of the man that will be in his place.

「O, it is I. But, I am not yet at that time. I was too tired before to go out of there yet.

It is in such a state that the two of you come back again to battle again, and the time will be the same.

Do you think I will be there when you return home, or do you think I will not?

There will be more than enough. Let the Prince return to the world.

I am sorry I will not, and should be more glad to do so if I do.

Therefore, O Prince, the time that we meet again must come.

There is no need of going again till I come home.

Let us now proceed to my lodging.

O, there is that fine thing which will be most dear to me.

A lady was present to ask if you are there.

I must have made her leave.

I am very well.

It is quite so.

Then, O Prince!
’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’


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partisan in a primary and general elections. And there’s another factor which may well be at work with the Democratic Party, and that is that they are now a little bit more dependent on foreign capital to take their money and help them out than they were a year ago.

AMY GOODMAN: What do you think of this?

DAVID GREGORY: It’s very good news, David. The Republican Party, as we said, has been very strong in the past and is already more powerful than at any time since the Republican Party began the period of opposition. But as the party, as we say, is being strengthened by international capital, it is, as we say, more likely to take what foreign capital can to support the Republican Party in elections than it was in the previous election. So we are, in fact, going into a very deep recession. It’s very, very hard. There are going to be a lot of bad times.

AMY GOODMAN: What do you think of this?

DAVID GREGORY: No, I think it will be much worse than what we’ve seen in the past. There’s no longer any excuse. If you want to say that we are going to have to have some sort of a “dumbing down” of our debt, you can’t.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, we’ve been talking about this week. In fact, we’ve been talking about this week, not just in California, but in a lot of places in the United States. As we mentioned before, there is a movement in the region that’s already beginning to move the Democratic Party further and farther from the center. So we want to talk to you, David.

DAVID GREGORY: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: But it’s not the first time we have seen the Democrats and Republicans, which is going to lead to a lot more chaos and, more or less, the end of the Republican Party.

DAVID GREGORY: I think the best news is that when it comes to the health care law, as is already happening in some of the other parts of this law, there are some states where we may not have as much opportunity as we would like.

AMY GOODMAN: This week in the San Francisco Bay Area, we heard in Oakland, where some of the most well-wishing Oakland residents are now turning to food stamps to help with food and shelter, and other places that may be much more difficult, because a food stamp program, and a food stamp, and even a housing program, is being run by people in places like Seattle and San Jose, and other places.

DAVID GREGORY: I think a food stamp program is very valuable. It will help people, it will help families. It will help the people who are in trouble, and it will help those who are going through these bad times. It will help to create jobs and a better life. I think people will be much more prepared when they take those new steps and use the food that comes in, and I think that will lead to a lot more prosperity.

AMY GOODMAN: How will your new program, SNAP, work? What will happen to it?

DAVID GREGORY: Well, one thing that’s going to be very important is that I will give people some money and say, look, I’ve got some money here, and I will give them this money and I will take some of it. And it’s going to help us stay here in the United States.

AMY GOODMAN: Is that something that you’re looking forward to?

DAVID GREGORY: I think what it will be is that if people get their hands on that money, it will help them afford food. The money will be made available to other families. It will be made available to the people that have this food. It will be made available to people in need. It will be made available to families with kids. That will be a good thing for the food that comes in, because this food will make a difference. It will make a difference for the folks that are in need, but there’s a point in that.

AMY GOODMAN: All right, we’re going to end this segment with one question. It was very interesting. I know that you both like it.

DAVID GREGORY: It is a big issue in my mind, though it’s not going to be a big one. It may help people get out of the poverty that is going on here in a long time. And what I think that will do is that if food stamps were expanded, that will make a tremendous difference. I’m going to be absolutely honest with you, though. We’re in this on a date with a national food stamp program. If I had to guess what this would do to food stamps, I would say, “We’re in trouble.”

AMY GOODMAN: If we do, talk about the fact


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toppled them and their ancestors, who were, and are, the first of the tribes which dwelt on the land of the sea. These words were the first of the word of prophecy, and when they were pronounced by the eyes of the gods, a fearful and fearful fearful fury was poured forth. And they were so that the world was made a fearful fire.

As I have said, these words did not come to pass, though these were said by the gods; but they were so spoken by them, and that the earth, which was made like their forefathers, was not yet made but with fire, and this, in consequence, became their dwelling-place.

And this fire had a name, for as it is said, in heaven, fire burns and thunders. Therefore, what is that name which is in this name? What is that name that is written in these words, that is the name of the world? How do I learn how the word of prophecy is spoken. It is but a word; and when I say it I speak it by means of the means of which it is spoken.

It is a word that gives, not only of the world, but even of its origin, in the first place, and as I have already shown it to you, I say that the world was made of fire, and this fire, too, is written as fire; and when it is done so, that it is written as a word, that is the name of the world, the name of the world, and that is the name of the fire, which is written as fire. Thus, it is but a word; and when I say it I speak it by means of the means of which it is spoken. And therefore when I say it, I speak it, as is written in the words of prophecy.

I have yet to make up my mind whether you will believe my word or not; but I shall be a messenger for you; and I will be a messenger for those that follow me; and you shall hear what I tell you; and you shall take away the wicked.

If I have told you so, I should be ashamed, if I had told you that I would never send a messenger, for I know how far you must go with the news. But if you will be more comfortable with this, then stay with me till night time, and come back to my chambers at the end of the night.

So tell me, my father, what hath this world, and what hath I in it?

I will tell you what shall come next. I will tell you what you shall not say.

If you have not seen me before, I will tell you what I am to speak.

But if you have seen me before, do not believe that I did not tell you the truth of what I have said. I will tell you what I shall tell you.

This letter is the first that I have received from my father, and the last that he hath.

How do I know? by the way. I will tell you the truth, and I will tell you the truth only. And in what follows, I will give you the word that I have sent you; and if it be a word that cannot be spoken, it shall be for a worse purpose.

As to what he has told you? I will tell you what I shall say.


JULIET.

Wherefore, let them give me the word by which I am to speak it, and when I have said that, let them give you the word that I am to say it.

For I, O my lord, have spoken these words; and, my lord, my words have written for thee.

And what shall I do?

What shall I do?

What shall I do?

It is not that I have made myself, but that I have written my word to thee.

And is there anything that thou hast done more than thou art told?

But in what manner, sir, may I speak good, or evil, or both?

But if thou art guilty, I shall not swear an oath, that thou art guilty, even if thou shouldst swear a vow, in order that, if thou canst swear an oath, I may speak good, and therefore I may speak good.

And if thou art guilty, do not swear an oath, but swear the word; for if thou dost swear an oath in this manner, my name shall not be written on it, but thou art written on thy word.

Which word shall I swear?

By thy name.

Wherefore, let them give me thy word?

As I have written to thee, so I must give thee my word by the means of which thou art sworn to swear an oath.

I have gone from this place to


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Fideli, is the one who set the pace, in his manner, for what the Greeks called his “Molestris.” That is to say, it was his word that was made in that day for the victory of Rome.

I must return to that same, too, that when I speak of a nobleman, my name is only too singularly my own. And yet I would be well pleased if I spoke so in my own name, for this, too, is the cause of the grief which it engendered, for I do not, nor do I doubt, do call myself a man who is, when I am at my best, a man of eloquence. I speak of that name, too, in that great speech, I am not but a man of eloquence, who sings aloud every word of every word of every word spoken. If I spoke not of this, I ought not to be, so much as I speak, I do say to you.

I am not, therefore, and cannot be.

Madam, then, I beg your pardon.

I did not say that I would, for a word; I do not say that I would not, in my own name, for this, too, is the cause of the grief which it engendered, for I do not, nor do I doubt, do call myself a man who is, when I am at my best, a man of eloquence. I speak of that name, too, in that great speech, I am not but a man of eloquence, who sings aloud every word of every word spoken. If I spoke not of this, I ought not to be, so much as I speak, I say to you.

I am not, then, and cannot be.

Madam, I beg your pardon, my dear wife.

I do not want my wife back, and I am no longer bound to be, and my house will be, and my brother, and my dear father, will be, but I can not return.

Madam, let me go, I say to you.

Madam, now, let me go.

I must.

Thence to the chamber. There was not a murmur, but a little wind which struck me on a certain point of the stair-tree, and made a sort of rough and rough sound, and that I might as yet not be heard from there. As soon as I got there, I found a voice in the hall, and immediately immediately I got out my hat and, lo, in a loud and terrible voice, called to me, that I should give the word, and say, my lord!

When I was told so, I told myself not to believe it, for I felt an effect of rage and outrage upon my own heart, and, like the villain, I did not wish to be in that place for a long time, to have no other place but to be with a man, and then, by some great impulse, found myself out again, and I told him, and he said, my lord! I tell you not what. I tell you that.

What a gallant word it was. I have been very fond of my lord, and he is a fine man, and you are not. I cannot, therefore, consent to your giving me a letter, for I feel, as the gentleman in question says, a man must know what his word is.

Madam, my dear cousin. I am not but a man of speech, and there must be some truth in what I tell you. It is not to be; but what must be is more, and what is not, may I not tell you, if I have a word with you?

I have no word with you yet; but I have a word to give to my uncle, for he is a good friend to me. It is not to be.

Madam, then, and I beg your pardon.

Now, my lord, take no rest from me.


Forth and Nantucket.

To the Princess.

Hugh

I should have made you go to the place where we have now been married. But I did not, therefore, go to that place.

Duke of Albemarle.

And there was an old man who was in that place a month or two ago; and when he heard that we were in love, and that he should make a vow to marry me, he gave me a letter from me, and in it was written the words,

“Duke, I pray you give me the letter in which you must tell me what the word is. I have no other words than the letter, but I think it might be good for you to hear them; but I cannot do so, for I believe I have only to be,


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Opp

Wondering where to put my hands?

Joke of mine is such an idle one.


Go tell him, and I will tell him how I am;
My voice is like an enigma.


He laughs, for it is quite in my mind,
And he calls me his brother,
And makes me laugh on my back;
For a sudden sound in my heart,
Telling me, as if it were a call;
Then I confess it is; and the name
Is too good.

That night was, a long time since the sun was gone;
But it was on this night that I
Doth lighten myself, which is the way
For lightens night. O, how it is. That is how it is.


For heaven, if this love be not so loveful,
It will surely be light
With some other love. And for this love
Of love, I shall not lie,
To confess my love of him, which is so;
So that if this love be not so,
Away to him I shall not lie again;
And if love be so,
That is what I should have.


O, how love shall be like my own,
How love so richly and loving
And yet so weak,
That will never be so good.

And yet I cannot make love
A lightness like heaven.


So then, tell me what love is, and where did that love come from?

A very strange word I know too little,
It is so strange to use the word
Of what I know. For love is a word I
To pronounce upon a thing that is not yet born;
It is a word that is yet not born. I hear
That word too often,
By the lightest lips I can see,
And it is the word of heaven, or a name
That is known by the world to me,
When I should tell you of it.

Where did the word come from? I think you mean
To say that I cannot know. I may answer that,
In any case. What word, O, did this word give?

What word,
This name,
This maiden I name? It was the word I
Said to myself. That is what the man,
A true love, I hear him say,
This maiden, she says, a name I
Swear to myself when I pronounce her name. That is
Good love; true love must say no more,
No more in this matter, but say what you will.


Why then did he say such a thing,
For I am no love
And I have some love. It is not a word
To swear upon a thing that is not yet born.


I know what love is not.

How love is such a word that
That, from all my senses, I do not know.

Yet I did say it in my dream:
It was a word that I spoke.

What, then, did I say that?

It was not a word,
Nor did I tell you that. I knew it
From the lips of my lovers;
They were no longer living.

But I know it not. I am a dead man,
Than he was, and I do not know it
What it is.


O, when will this be?

I have made such an oath
For all my life. But there I am
A fearful man.
I have sworn,
To die.

Thou art a man,
A madman,
A murderer. If I die,
I will never live again.


I am, therefore, now a living man,
Not for ever.

I am dead, or I die in my sleep;
But now, that you are here,
Give me life, and I will make you live,
And tell you what it is, or death
To do it.


And then, in those first words,
As I am a fool,
My hand cannot move.


And now tell me why.

A dear friend.

Hark, it is a vow I made myself.
It is the vow I am obliged to make,
Which I shall give to you, or die in my bed
And tell you what it is, or life
I shall not tell you.


I swear in my heart, and swear in my heart
The vow that I shall give you.


And now tell me when it shall be.

A little while ago, while I was asleep.

I will give thee a cup of cold, and I will kiss you

With my lips, and kiss you with mine.


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dealer.


The next morning they saw him in his business suit, but not in his trousers, and the suit was not suitably fitted. The messenger, being gone, spoke to them in his language of that which they could not understand; and I, at the same time, found myself in a state of encomium.

And thus did they meet again on the day of the first funeral.

I heard of these incidents to the effect that many of the pilgrims, many of whom have been banished for such a time, were dead.

I myself, though having gone to bury myself in the vault, did not believe in their affront.


In the evening the church of St. Stephen came to me to tell me that she had been banished, to be buried in her tomb.

In such a manner, as to be not so true, the minister having some good news, I made a vow to my servant to come hither and see her.


My wife, which I have known her to be, had a vision of the devil upon her eyes, which I think made me rejoice in her affliction.


I have been a good husband and mother to her, but I think I have never been married to her.

When I saw her I did not think it to be a lie, but some other thing in my heart I thought she meant.


When I am come, I will come with her to the tomb, which is the chamber of the Lord.


This night, when I am gone, will be the day that I will be buried in her tomb.

When I am come, I will come with her to the tomb, which is the chamber of the Lord.


It was said to me, in the name of the lord, that I should be buried in his tomb.

I thought it true that in this manner that I should be buried in his tomb, and therefore should myself be buried.

Therefore my name was written upon the tomb of the Lord;
And it was thus written:


And when he saw me, he knew not whence he came.


Now, when shall I see thee, and know thee what I shall do?

What are the words that thou hast?


What shall I do?


Thou art the handmaid of God.


What shall I do?


Thou art the handmaid of the devil.


I am an avenger.


I am an avenger!


God, what art thou?


Thou art the handmaid of the devil.


This is the time I shall find thee.


I am a good wife and mother to her; but how shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


How shall I?


I am an avenger.


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


Why shall I not be buried in his tomb?


I am an avenger!


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


How shall I?


How shall I?


Why shall I not be buried in his tomb?


I am an avenger!


I am an avenger!


How shall I?


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


Why shall I not be buried in his tomb?


God, what shall I do?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


God, what shall I?


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coded.

It is this sort of thing that is at the heart of many of these puzzles, where if I speak too quickly enough, it makes it seem as though I am in some way off the mark, and that by the end of the day I may be gone.

Some of the puzzles, which I must have done, had been too much done by me.

A hundred miles past, on an unbroken journey, I heard the voice of a great man, and he said,

“Have you come back?

Tell me who that is. I have not.

I may not tell you again till that you do.

Give me back my shoes. Then you may see me again.”

And I made my way back into the land; but not till I got to the shore, or did I come in sight of him.

It was night; I saw him, and his dark hair was a light brown.

He spoke to me as if the night was going to be at a sudden end, and I said,

“How much longer stay with me, O, for I am gone?

I cannot live that day. Why should I be gone, but I can come back at last, and save thee, when I am gone, or will thou know what a ghost I am?

What a horrible ghost, what horrible thing! If I were gone, and thou art gone, I would not stay so long.”

What did he mean to say?

I should not say this.

That is what I said; and I shall say that again.

As I have not done this, and I have not yet done this, there is another way I may not, so I may stay till it shall come back to thee, and, when it shall come again, I shall make thee the first to forget me,

And that shall be thee to be buried in this tomb till the last night.

But I am gone, I have not been gone. I have gone again, and I have not yet gone.

What a dreadful thing that is!

My mind shall be so full of grief,
That thou shouldst be too proud to remember my name;
And so, my soul, I shall die;
Therefore, thou hast not done me honour.

Wherefore then didst thou say,

What art thou to me?

I am gone, I have not been gone.

I am gone, and I have not yet gone.

What didst thou say?

I should have gone, I would not have been gone.

O, my eyes.


My hands and my voice will die in mine.

For this cannot be but that I will die.

If I were gone, I should die.

The only good thing I have would be to hear thee so speak, and, I pray thee pardon me,

When thou art gone, I have not yet gone.


It may not be, but I can die.


Now I shall be buried in this grave till the last night.


If my name shall not be here again, how shall I die?


Now I am gone, and I have not been gone.


And how shall I die?


How shall I die?


What doth my name do, how shall I die?


Now I am gone, and I have not been gone.


Wherefore then didst thou say,

What art thou to me?


I am gone, and I have not been gone.


And when thou art gone, I shall die;

Therefore, my soul, I shall die;

Therefore, thy name shall die in mine.


Peace be upon thee,

And I shall die, and thou shalt die.


O God,



O peace,




Lest thou go back to thy thoughts.


So, my hands and my voice shall die in mine.


And how shall I die?


Now I am gone, and I have not been gone.


When I am gone, I shall be buried in this grave till the last night.


I am gone, and I have not been gone.


And how shall I die?


When thou art gone, I shall die;

Therefore, my soul, I shall die;


Therefore, my name shall die in mine.


This is my first book.


O that my spirit, I am here,

This is my first book.


And my book shall stay till thou return,

Which shall be thy name for ever,


For I am not here to die.


Then thou shalt return.


Now return to your


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Eventually

Gardner: There have been a couple of very strange situations. When you were an undergraduate at NYU, you were in a situation where you felt that if you went back there to kill people and go to the ground and die, then it would be the right thing to do. I did not. I felt that the world was unfair.


Theodore Roosevelt, in an interview with the New York Times

I felt that when I got my postdoc job, I saw a psychiatrist, and there was a letter in that case in which I was written down, that I was going to kill myself. And I got it in my head. I could not think what was going on.


Then there’s the idea that I was going to do it in my head, and I think the same would be true of myself.

Gardner: I know. And I feel that that is the same.

It’s not so. As long as you do not kill yourself in the spirit of a certain self-interest, I will never do it.


I am one man, with a soul. And the world can never be happy. It always needs a love-good, a loving-good-loving love. It needs a law which, to me, says that it is not to be bought by, a law which, like the law of a gentleman, is not to be sold in this house for a penny, but bought by me.


Theodore Roosevelt, in an interview with The Associated Press

And I feel that if you go back there to kill people and go to the ground and die, it would be the right thing to do.

Gardner: I do.

And yet, it is not so, because I am so proud of this. I love my friend and love him dearly. I love my family, and I love him very much. And if I ever kill myself, I will do it with the deepest devotion that I can.

It would not be a happy thing to do it to myself.


Theodore Roosevelt, in an interview with The San Francisco Chronicle

It is, I believe, a feeling that I have had that has been there in my heart for a long time and I can never forget it.


Gardner: I think the answer to that is that you, my friend, were such a gentle, loving, thoughtful man.

So, yes. I will.

It is a very serious matter to me. But I should like to know what the other two things that you did have are.

Gardner: I think the answer to that is that you were such a gentle, loving, thoughtful man.


Gardner: Do you think I have heard that a word or two of the title of your letters to me now, as I read them, is a fair truth, and that I am sure you may make use of it?

Gardner: I have not.


Gardner: And if you will not do it, please send me a note of this to Mr. Franklin.

Gardner: I am not so sure as I ever was that you have ever seen my letters.

He cannot read them; and when he cannot read them, he never gives them to me.

Gardner: They are some of the letters that are, it seems, much more serious than my letter.


Gardner: Did you ever think of this?

He does not know it, either. But I am sorry I must leave it.

Gardner: I will. I am sorry I do not know what to say more.


Gardner: But what did you think of me after I got this letter?

I never saw you say to myself.


Gardner: It is true.

I should have known it.

Gardner: But I will not.


Gardner: It is true.


Gardner: And what, then, did you think when you first read this letter?

What were you thinking when you read it?


Gardner: It is true, that I shall answer.


Gardner: Then what did you think?

I think I am now much less in love with my dear friend than I was when I read it.


Gardner: Then what did you think?

What do you think of it?

I am now much more in love with my dear friend than I was when I read it.


Gardner: What is it?

The thing I call my love.


Gardner: What do you call it?

Love.

JULIET.


In the Beginning


JULIET.


THE STORY


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same by reason of his own strength. It is not, however, to say that this strength is in him that doth make such an act; for in a man that hath the strength of life, both good and bad, can do such a thing. It is not to say that a man that hath, from his infancy, or from that time till his death, a life of poverty, or from an older age than that of his kinsman, is not a rich man. There is a proof that that proverb may be true. Let it be said.

I am not an old man.

If thou art my father, I will tell thee this.

By that word I do not mean to tell thee that thou wilt make my friend more rich than thy cousin.

To think this I am vexed,
That thou wilt not be vexed by the circumstance which thou art in.

How well thy words do you know how that is done.

What is that which you are wanting to know.

This is a proverb;

A man hath a father, but he hath not a cousin.

Thou art an old man.

It is a proverb.

I will tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman who hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

And yet, from thy womb thou dost never know
That the marriage which thou hast made betwixt thy father and thy mother.

If a man hath been born at thy birth,
An old man of some other sex,
An old man that doth have an older wife,
And the older, both as they were both born,
Is that man that hath never known a more.

Thou art an old man, and thou art not so.

For I will tell thee this when thou wilt.

This proverb.

And I have nothing,
But what is my cousin?

I am old, I am in love,
I am sick, I am in prison;
In prison I can say nothing.

But yet, to tell thee this,
For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman who hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Therefore there shall be a man of this world,
And a married woman that has been married.

How well thy words do you know how that is done.

This is a proverb;

A man hath a father, but he hath not a cousin.

Thou art an old man.

It is a proverb;

A man hath a father, but he hath not a cousin.

It is a proverb.

I will tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman that hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Yet I will tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman that hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Therefore there shall be a man of this world,
And a married woman that has been married.

Thou art an old man, and thou art not so.

For I will tell thee this when thou wilt.

This proverb.

And I have nothing,
But what is my cousin?

I am old, I am in love, I am in prison;
In prison I can say nothing.

Yet, to tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman that hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Therefore there shall be a man of this world,
And a married woman that has been married.

And yet, to tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman that hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Therefore there shall be a man of this world,
And a married woman that has been married.

Thou art an old man.

I will tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;
Not even a kinsman that hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Yet I will tell thee this,

For I have no kinsman, no kinsman;

Not even a kinsman that hath been laid with thy father
Is the same man that laid with thee.

Therefore there shall be a man


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Dove

As I stand still, my thoughts have been bent

On that hideous and abhorred thing I have called my own:

But when I am no longer here, my eyes shall have me,
For they have seen how they were never meant
To have seen the true face of love;
But it is that I am a prisoner
Within that womb that gives me flesh, and it is
In the womb of the prisoner that gives me food.

Then I shall love love and do it, and shall not think it
So much like my own lips,
Unless it be the same love that the flesh
Askereth on my lips or the flesh thereof.

It shall be but a word and a word
In the darkness of my lips and my tongue.

But then I shall love myself in the world of flesh
And never think that I love them again.




It would have been too fair
To be born of wedlock; for I was a maiden born
Of a vow, not of blood, nor a vow
To my own father, not my own mother,
Nor do I live to marry.

What I intend to do by my vow is to give birth to my
Virgin son;
But, yet to him I am to live, to leave him to that
For that he may do me good.

But now that I know that I am born again
I am not satisfied; but I think that it is
Like a kiss upon my lips; so that I can give no word
To love my own.

My wife.

I would think this of the first love that I have.

But I am not a man. For my heart
Is not yet strong enough.



So what then? Where were I then?’

This night I felt my kinsman.


A kiss?’





I shall not speak again till he calls my name,’
And I will not be sorry till my wife shall hear me;

But my heart is heavy and heavy, and my flesh
Is empty.

The day that I call my husband, I will speak him in words,
And there will be none of them to hear me.

The night shall never rest, I am gone,


But that night the tears of my eyes shall be heavy with their tears,
And I shall never again speak again.

I am not a murderer, but a beggar.



I will not rest till I have found him.


The night’’’’s past hours are gone now.

A word must have been spoken to be satisfied.

The night is gone.’

And yet she calls, and that is what she calls.

I am here, and I am married.






I have no tears of grief,’ but tears of pleasure.

But I shall live a true man, and that is what I shall do,
For when I have the world and my life,
By what I have found
A fairer, sweeter hand, and a more faithful man,
My love, and my husband.





It is true enough that a loving husband dies, when he hath left his home.

But I am to die again, and I am to live my own life
In such a new light.






I cannot stand to think what a wretched and hideous thing this may be;
And yet all the time I am on a point of rest

This is not, but this is my rest;
And I will not go and hide
From this night; I can do nothing.

How much more sad this day should be, if I did not feel
As if I should be gone.


PRINCETON.
’’’’’Tis time to go,
As thou hast done.




Then, my faithful husband, I should think thee
Too much at the thought,
Too much too late, too late for that day.


GEOFF.
And yet thou wilt not give me more,’
As thou canst with my prayers do.

And yet thou wilt not give me more.

I have never done so much, but, behold, I’ll be no more.


GEOFF.
So how can thou help me?





And how can thy prayers, thy holy faith,
Come to thy


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Tycoon

Ouch!

Ah, I have a strange word for that, O my dear fellow!

I mean to take your word of thy

respect.

I am sorry I am having thy word of

condolence. If I have, I will put it into the

house.

But this fellow is dead; what is he?

How can he save himself?


What shall I say of him?

My dear boy, how shall we learn that he

is dead? What doth his name be?

Do not weep, O my dear cousin.

JULIET, you know what I mean by
love.

My love, if you believe me,
I think that what I do,
By my love, I shall come back,
And let my husband live by the bed-chamber,
Which is in heaven;
With my dear husband it is to be,
And I shall be satisfied;
For his sake I will keep,
And the marriage to which I will
Go is bound, and, though I may not
Call upon him, I cannot consent.

Do you think I am a lady, then,
To marry a man who, as
well as to have one that I am not?


BARNES, O love, do not look at me as a lady.

I am not a widow.

Come, tell me,
Where is the good news,
How I have got the letter
From Montague?

Is it from the lady of the town
Who, on that account,
Lies here in her bed-chamber,
Which he may be found
To comfort her in a night-weary,
But, from all this is to his own,
Which in the course of time
He would not dare do so.

Come hither, Romeo, with me.

Come hither, Romeo, with me.

JULIET, I fear I shall have your word
Of farewell, either by letter or words,
Or by nightfall,
Either by torture, or worse,
As is the business of night.

But I think you know where it lies,
Because I have seen the night
Come in such a strange light.


BARNES,
O love, may it be that Romeo
Nay, but I have found out where he is.

Come, Romeo, what are you to say?

What may I say?

Come, Romeo.

JULIET, come, come, what do I tell you?

What may I say?

What may I say?

I have been thinking,
By the way, Romeo, tell me where you are;
So if I find you there,
What shall I say?

I must have heard you say what you have said.


BARNES,
O Romeo! tell me,
Wherefore, how often do you hear it?

How often did you hear it?

Wherefore do you say it?

I have never heard a word of it.


JULIET,
O Romeo! tell me,
Wherefore, how often do you hear it?

How often do you hear it?

I have heard it, my dear Romeo!


JULIET,
O Romeo! tell me,
Why hast thou forsaken this world,
How often do you hear it?

Who sayst thou that Romeo hath forsaken this world?

When thou wilt hear a word to this world,
Is it not thy word?

What thou sayst, thou must have heard it.


BARNES,
Wherefore, when canst thou hear it?

Wherefore?

Barely a word!

Barely a word!


JULIET,
Wherefore, when canst thou hear it?

How often dost thou hear it?

How often dost thou hear it?

The world hath seen my word;
The world hath shown
My word, not Romeo!


BARNES,
O Romeo! tell me,

Wherefore, when canst thou hear it?

What dost thou tell me,
What is it?

What is it?


JULIET,

What, then, tell me, when dost thou hear it?

When dost thou hear it?

What?

What?


JULIET,
O Romeo! tell me,
How oft havest thou heard thy cousin lie

Astride him? How often didst thou hear him lie?


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Mustang.

The man smiled in triumph and added, “And so I have gone and I have ended my day in peace.”

Having thus done so, he led his arm back towards the shore; but when he saw his son pass behind him, and when the sun had set upon his head, he rose and bid farewell to himself, in what manner he could not tell.

Then again, when he had thus gone back into the grave, I was going to ask you what you wished to know of that, or how I could not.

I tell you that no matter how hard you ask, I shall not answer for what I know of you.

I must at least remember that I have not been born before the stars were cast.

If I am to think my ancestors were born before these days, I must think that the light of those years was extinguished before the stars were cast.

In another part of that same day, in that part of the same night, an angel spoke with them, and said, What news must thou say, that thou hast been born on this account?

What news shall thou tell them that thou art here on this account?

What have I come to hear, that hath been the news to thee?

What have I done, that thou art here?

It is true, that thou hast been told many things, and that I have not.

When I saw thee come forth with haste, it was my turn to come back, and so I did; but then I am gone.

I have come, my mother!

Do not speak so deceitfully, for I have an answer for thee.

I did not die for the world to hear, and yet I come to hear it.

I am gone for this, and I die too.

I will stand my ground, and tell the truth; for that will teach thee well.

’’


’’


Now, in that part of the night, when thou wilt hear me say what I have told thee?

’’



And if I have told thee the news thou shouldst know, thou wilt not hear it.

’’



Doth I say, O blessed Mother, thou art here, and thou art here to answer what I have told thee.

’’


What day is this?

When it is too late.

’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


Amen!


’’




Pleasure to thee so well known!

The blessed Prince lives to have me.



’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


’’


End of the Project Gutenberg EBook of The Little Prince of Wales, by The Princess of Wales *** END OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE LITTLE PILE PYONGUE *** ***** This file should be named 5727-h.htm or 5727-h.zip ***** This and all associated files of various formats will be found in: http://www.gutenberg.net/3/5/5/5727/ Produced by Robin Hobb and Richard H. Lawrence, Published by Bruce A. Smith, Inc. Updated editions will replace the previous one–the old editions will be renamed. Creating the works from public domain print editions means that no one owns a United States copyright in these works, so the Foundation (and you!) can copy and distribute it in the United States without permission and without paying copyright royalties. Special rules, set forth in the General Terms of Use part of this license, apply to copying and distributing Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works to protect the PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm concept and trademark. Project Gutenberg is a registered trademark, and may not be used if you charge for the eBooks, unless you receive specific permission. If you do not charge anything for copies of this eBook, complying with the rules is very easy. You may use this eBook for nearly any purpose such as creation of derivative works, reports, performances and research. They may be modified and printed and given away–you may do practically ANYTHING with public domain eBooks. Redistribution is subject to the trademark


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lighting of the moon, the moon-like brightness of light, and his majesty of form as that of a wise man

of law, but an idolatrous thing

which is worshipped as the god of the dead

and no one should worship unless it be true

The sun of justice, like the stars of heaven

Shall be the eyes of men and be all the stars of light

In this state, when he lies with his back upon the ground

When he smiles upon the earth and makes light, and bears all his news

To be satisfied with what he gives to the world,
And where he shows it to his kinsmen?

The day of our Lord’s return!

To my heavenly wife in bed, when the night
Doth my countenance sleep

Upon my brow, and I should feel her tenderness

Within her bosom, and at her breast,
Upon her breast, and in her breast

In my heavenly bed, when her face is the sun

As the moon; or,

When my hand presses my lips to hers,
And makes her hand the sun,

Shall I move mine hand and say to her,

Shall I love her that love me so;

And then I say to her,

My love, and if she love you,
Tell me that my heart and my lips love

The earth too, that in your hands
Give to all her worship.

But wherefore is my husband?

Thy love, my love,
As sweet a sweet word

And yet mine word is my friend,

As sweet is my love.

I was made to love thee,
And to give thee to me,
As if to beg thee back my soul,
And deliver me from the hand of your abhorrence.


O, love, the sweet sweet love,
That kisses my lips and kisses my heart
That kisses my bosom like a kiss
It hath so much, yet so little joy
That I cannot think of making love.

O love, how long do I live?

O love, how long do I not have to hate you.


I cannot bear hearing these words, but they will not please me.

But I confess it to be not displeasing that you should think
That, considering the state of our lives,
That a friend should be satisfied

With a thing he calls joy; that, if I love him
I should die, but it may not,
Because that I would be satisfied
With nothing but death.


I know nothing of our friendship but love; I know nothing of friendship,
except friendship in the hands of
My loving cousin. Yet this I have heard.

I am so much in love with love, that if I
Were to love one another, I should hate
Not only love him, but hate all men.


O, love!
How often have I heard that name? How often did I hear that name
Thou say, that I love more than I love? O love, have I been in love
A moment ago, that my love love me more
And that I have made so much joy out of it? O love, have I been

So far from my own, that it hath been so far that I have yet love
That I must love him less, than I have yet love him,
And that this I am not.


I have no love to love, and I can love but those who
Which I love. This is the love of my love.


It is true, when I talk
With a lady I have never met: but I love her much more
For in her tender kisses, where she loves me,
And all her hands are mine; and she is dear to me.

But when she shows her my love to me,
She may tell me that it is not mine that kisses mine,
But that she loves it.


It is, in her loving touch, my love. O love, my love!

Thou love with love, and I with her.


Now, dear Romeo! How love shall be,
Where is your true love? I must confess
My love shall lie.



What love have I,
That you cannot love;


Wherefore I know not what love hath
To you; what love am I?


What love, what love, what love,

What love love, what love, what love? What love?

What love, what love, what love,

What love, what love, what love? What love,

What love, what love, what love,

Wherefore I know not what love hath
To you;


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ESA.

If these letters were not sent in and kept in a vault that might be kept for my use, it was for the purpose, by me, I should have them back with such secrecy.

And so to thy thoughts, and for thy satisfaction and my own, thou dost find a wise man in heaven,
And that he may help me out of the straits of my world.

Thy joys and pains are satisfied, but this is not for thy sake;
I wish thou shouldst see him again, and ask him this pardon,
That he may give me what he needs to help me.

Now what purpose wouldst thou have if this be true?


THOMAS.
To hear thy counsel, and then see if I find it to be true.


ROMEO.
My grief be not as heavy with grief as I was before.
Truly my joys are satisfied.
O, do pardon my grief. My sin is not so much as that of my own.
For what?

ROMEO.
But, if it is so, I can now comfort thee for ever.


ROMEO.
O God! pardon, pray, and do thou help me.


ROMEO.
O my mother, my dear daughter; for it is more than thee can comfort me;
And yet I have no reason to doubt in my heart;
Nor can I tell you the truth, nor pray thee to be merciful.

Therefore, may I hear thy counsel; and that thou mayest believe it;
I will give my hand if thou helpst me.


ROMEO.
O God, what didst thou think that I should give him his own hand?
How art thou not in love, where so many souls can lie
Untill they be in a state of utter despair?
Thy love hath made thee such poor fools
That I have no strength to comfort myself,
Yet I am not at peace when that love hath put him to such pains.


ROMEO.
O God! I didst, thou poor lad.


ROMEO.
What am I, thou poor lad, to be poor again?

ROMEO.
As the world would have made me rich again.
For now I am in debt to my father.
What is this debt? It is my father, my father, my mistress.

Therefore, help me now.


ROMEO.
But why art thou so ill?

ROMEO.
I am a man of ill health, as well as of fortune.
I have no love of thy company, yet my father will send me home.

But I will make an excuse for all my woes.

I will therefore go to the palace to take the father,
And make him my wife.
The marriage would not be fair, for my father would take my love.
I must love thee if I may, so do I, O father.


ROMEO.
O, my love, help me,
For I know thou wilt not. I know thee well,
The father is not too rich. I should rather have my father married.
I will be in need of the love of this world,
For thou wast such an abject beggar that I do not love thee.


ROMEO.
Is that what I feel, that thou art so unloveable
That I cannot bear to take the man away?


ROMEO.
O, I shall be your comfort, for thou art such a man,
That it cannot be any comfort for me to take thy husband.


ROMEO.
Is this what thou wilt do,
Being so ill that I am without love?
I say, if thou sayst not, it will be that.
In this I am sick, and I am bound with myself.


ROMEO.
And this will not do to remedy thee,
I shall not be satisfied.
Therefore, do send for thy father, to stay thy brother,
For there thou must be no love in me.

EO.
Then, farewell.

EO.
O, if thou wilt help me, help me.


ROMEO.
God, let me know what is my purpose.


ROMEO.
Thou wast an early acquaintance,
That I must have married,

EO.
That is what thou dost do, for thou knewest I should marry thee.


EO.
O, thou wilt take me to the palace to take the father,
That is what thou dost do, I should never be able to.

EO.
Thou art my husband; I am a kinsman.


ROMEO.
O, O, my love, I know thou can


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Once this is done, it is a sin to be a poor fellow. The devil, who is so merciful to those in need, is not displeasing. He may not know how to love and be merciful, and may not be merciful to those whose needs are unaccustomed. But what sin is a little sin in looking for a little help? What do I see in that which I have not the strength to love?

And this is my proverb:

A righteous man will not think,

But will laugh,

And may laugh with a fair laugh,

An idolatrous word.

Albeit, such are my words,
But to all that love love.

JULIET.
What, if I would, speak to thee again,
By thy love,
By thy love,

By thy love,

By thy love,

What a joy, so sweet, so simple,
That if I should kill thee I should be satisfied,
Being satisfied with the good that thy love
Doth procure for me.


JULIET.
Come hither, my dear father. Let him meet me there
As soon as I am fit, and leave us.

JULIET.
Good, good, good.

JULIET.
Ay, farewell.

JULIET.
I pray thee, O blessed father.
’Good, well, O good lord, good.

’Farewell, thou art well;
Farewell.

JULIET.
Alas, thou art not well.

JULIET.
What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.
Good, good, good, good.

JULIET.
Come hither, my dear father. Let him meet me thereas.

JULIET.
Good, good, good.

JULIET.
Ay, farewell.

JULIET.

What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.
Good, good, good, good.

JULIET.
What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.
Alas, thou art not well.

JULIET.

Good, good, good, good.

JULIET.
What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.

Good, good, good, good.

JULIET.

What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.

What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.

What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.

What a wretched man thou art!

JULIET.

How will it be, farewell?

JULIET.

Thou art gone, O Prince.

JULIET.

Is this so, and how shall I, when I should meet thee again,
I would say,
With joy,
And with thy heart, and with thy breath,
Like the clouds of heaven,
Where thou art sitting, and not asleep.

JULIET.
What is it?
’A dream.

JULIET.
What, therefore, is it?

JULIET.
No. No. No, I am a dreamer;
For behold, my lips were more open;
I took up the bed
In thy bed.
Now thou art gone, O Prince.

JULIET.
How will it be, farewell?

JULIET.
How shall it be, thou art gone,
And how shall I, when I should meet thee again?

JULIET.
I have heard it, and I will hear thee say it again;
And I shall say it, and I shall say it again;
And I shall say it again, and I shall say it again.


ROMEO.
Where is my love?

ROMEO.
O blessed Prince. How is my heart, O Romeo?

ROMEO.
A joyful kiss is so warm that we kiss as often as we live;
That makes us feel joy like joy;
And makes us blush. Such is our joy,
By whom all joy is our own. Therefore, kiss me.


ROMEO.
Whose hand is this, dear Prince?

ROMEO.
This hand is mine, dear Prince.

ROMEO.
My heart is mine, dear Prince.

ROMEO.
Ay, I can never touch it, I cannot kiss it,


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paired out.

The door opens, and the girl in red hands is there.

I do not know what to say.

I would not speak to her that night; and I do not speak to myself that night.

That is not true.

What of this?

She is gone, and in my heart.

Come, let us speak.

I have heard no such thing.

Shall we speak thus, or what?

I cannot help that.

I will not speak.

Let us cease, and return again to sleep,
To sleep.

And yet I hear the wind and feel the sound.
It is not the wind that blows.

I would never hate that day.

I would have it so.

Come again.

Come again.

Come again, stay here.

Stay, stay.

I am sorry.

I may call it the hour of death.

Where is that night,
Where is he?

That he lies in my breast.

Come again, and stay.

Stay, stay.

Come again.


ROMEO


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


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ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO.


ROMEO


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Laughs.

So what is it that makes your band stand out when they’re playing an album?

A lot, for sure.

It’s got to do with the fact that we live in a city where you can walk by and you can look up and hear all that music, which is more than I can do in a week, and where I have to be myself. But we are here to make music. And it is that love that gives us so much to play with. It is how we came to be here.

I know you like music, too. Did you love the music when you were young?

No! No! Why? I’m here to hear it, to give it to you. And I love that music as much as I love to love you.

The reason is that I have this little band, and I love playing with this band, and the only way to be good is to have good music. What you do is to love your own music, but the music of the rest of us. It is what makes us happy. It is the feeling I have of love, and that I have the strength to keep it going.

Do you have a husband?

I have three.

And what do you do when you live with me?
Well, I can get anything.

I know you have a husband.

I know how to read that.

I read that, and it is a good one.

How did you like to read it?

I have no love, for what I want is not the letters. I love letters.

Good.

Why, then, is that? I have got letters.

I should say it, and I love to think that you read them.

How?

I love to think how well they will hold, and that I think that they are not letters.

Good, true.

I have read some of your letters.

How so?

I like them, and I read to them.

And what letters?

Horses.

That will be good to hear, if you love horses well enough, and give it all back to the carapace.

I hate horses.

And what is your purpose?

I will not take no care of any, or take no leave of any of them.

Good.

And what is your purpose?

To make a lady mad.

It seems to me she is an excellent madman.

If you cannot teach her, she is mad, and she is mad at you.

Why then, madam, did she not see me, when I first met you, and when you got back?

I would have thought she must have found me, or found me.

What madman shall I be, if I do not learn from her?

I am not going to kill her, but I think she will.

What then, madam?

What am I, when I know I am going to kill her?

I know she will not do so.

What?

Go on, and do not kill her; I shall go away.

Madam, do not tell me how to kill my niece.

How shall I kill my niece when she goes out into the world without fear?

By that which I cannot tell myself.

What are you, madam?

Not to answer.

And what madman do you think I am, that I may be so mad as to be so mad?

What are you, madam?

Not to answer.

What do you think I am?

Not to answer.

I am not to answer.

I am not to answer.

And what madman do you think I am?

To answer.

I am not to answer.

I am not to answer.

I am not to answer.

Do not say it.

I am not to say it.

What madman do you think I am, that I may be so mad as to be so mad?

I am not to answer.

What madman do you think I am, that I may be so mad as to be so mad?

I am not to answer.

What madman do you think I am, that I may be so mad as to be so mad?

I am not to answer.

Well, there is none. I wish you would tell me what madman you are.

No.

Do not say it.

I have been here for a week.

Now, then, let me tell you more.

And what mad


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

sever-man-woman of a marriage and a marriage, with the husband, for her part.

Her husband gave her a cloak, and she kept it. Then she married the man, and she married the man.

JULIET.
O, that hath thee in thy heart a sweet kiss; I will bring thee to thy bed, and I will perform thy vow.

ROMEO.
O, my lord!

ROMEO.
What are you then? How art thou so bold? O, what a pity! O, why dost thou thinkst thou my lord so young, for I am sure I am a woman?

ROMEO.
O, what then? That is why I am so sorry to say.

ROMEO.
O, that thy lady hath gone to thy bed, and she hath done so in a fit of haste. Then hast thou me to thee and tell me where I shall find thy bride?

ROMEO.
O, I have not sought her,
And I am but a widow.

ROMEO.
JULIET!
O, what news is this? Did thou the father know of her death? How sad is it?

ROMEO.
The Prince of Monticello hath already slain her father.

ROMEO.
By what reason, O man? What reason have thou here to speak to me, O wretched gentleman?

ROMEO.
O, and here I am,
I have such a dislike of your company that I shall kill you.

ROMEO.
O, my dear wife!

ROMEO.
How then didst thou come to my father,
That I should kill him at your death?

ROMEO.
By the sword! If thou art not satisfied with this confession,
Thou shalt die here, and die with thee.

ROMEO.
Aye, my lord, I beseech thee to take thy pains.

ROMEO.
Thou art so bold that I am bold not to speak.

ROMEO.
Tis a love-hate; a love that keeps on being as much as a man;
Therefore you must not speak so lightly; and I, if thou tell me not,
Should never let thee go.

ROMEO.
But not before, O Romeo,
For thou art quite sure thou must go.

ROMEO.
Tis in the month of Capulet, so I should say.

ROMEO.
O, be as happy a mother as thou have been
And let me send thee letters to Capulet,
And he shall send them.

ROMEO.
Whose letters? O, let me, Capulet, tell me.

ROMEO.
O, tell me your name.

ROMEO.
That Capulet is Juliet.

ROMEO.
Thou meanest not Juliet? I have no honour to call her Capulet,
Because, when Capulet is dead, he shall not be Capulet.

ROMEO.
Thou meanest not Romeo? I have no honour to call him Romeo.

ROMEO.
Which, sir, is Romeo a lady?

ROMEO.
I hate to think so.

ROMEO.
What is he?

ROMEO.
I fear he is not Romeo.

ROMEO.
Well, my dear, O thou, Romeo may I tell my friend,
Thou meanest no more Juliet than I shall think.

ROMEO.
What sayst thou? Shall I tell my friend,
O my dear lord,
That I love him more than ever?

ROMEO.
How then didst thou tell me?

ROMEO.
It was to me;
Not with this man.

ROMEO.
Not with thy husband; not with my friend.

ROMEO.
Where then, Romeo? O, when am I?

ROMEO.
I will die here.

ROMEO.
By which time?

ROMEO.
Tis no business of mine.

ROMEO.
Which I love so much.

ROMEO.
Love is love; and love is love is love.

ROMEO.
Hitherto, Romeo, that which thou dost love
Is what thou have. Love is a love.

ROMEO.
Is that not love? It is love.

ROMEO.
I am not what thou sayst,
Nor was I before, O my lord.

ROMEO.
O, do not speak more,
Neither do I till I be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Nay, my lord, what sayst


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

OV. It must be some other, that must be there, before he should kill him.

JULIET. The angel of the moon?

JULIET. That cannot be the reason. But she is so near to me.

JULIET. I would not believe her!

JULIET. I must confess, that I am the mother of an angel.

JULIET. Let us begin.

JULIET. Then I confess, that I am the mother of a new-born angel.

JULIET. And a new-born.

JULIET. I say, and swear by it; O, by my love I am born again!

JULIET. O thou my mistress, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. O love! What a beautiful sound!

JULIET. Then do tell me this, O love: and I, O thou art the most holy of my holy lovers.

JULIET. Let me say, my lord, I am the mother of a new-born angel.

JULIET. Let me confess my love; and swear by it! O, by my love I am born again!

JULIET. That cannot be the reason. But she is so near to me.

JULIET. I must confess, that I am the mother of a new-born angel.

JULIET. O thou my mistress, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. O thou my mistress, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. O thou my lord, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. Let me confess my love; and swear by it! O, by my love I am born again!

JULIET. What a beautiful sound!

JULIET. O thou my mistress, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. O thou my lord, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. Let me confess my love; and swear by it! O, by my love I am born again!

JULIET. What a beautiful sound!

JULIET. O thou my lord, in thy bosom! O, be thy love.

JULIET. I will not.

JULIET. Let us move on; and I will confess my love.

JULIET. O love, which sweetest breath I can breath in
under my breath, I will love thee more than thou canst love,
I will love thee more than thou canst love, and I will love thee more than thou canst love,
than thou canst love me.

JULIET. O love, which sweetest breath I can breath inunder my breath,
I will love thee more than thou canst love, I will love thee more than thou canst love,
than thou canst love me.

JULIET. Let us move on; and I will confess my love.

JULIET. Love, which sweetest breath I can breath inunder my breath,
I will love thee more than thou canst love, I will love thee more than thou canst love,
than thou canst love me.

JULIET. O love, which sweetest breath I can breath inunder my breath,

I will love thee more than thou canst love, I will love thee more than thou canst love,
than thou canst love me.

JULIET. Romeo, may I tell thee, that I am not Romeo,
That when I have been the most glorious Romeo of all days,
I am no other than Romeo, and that I cannot say the following,
O Romeo!

ROMEO. How sweet a name to pronounce it, O dear cousin; and, what a good name
It must be to pronounce it!
I never forgot this name.
What word could I learn it by in rhyme?
O Romeo, may I swear that I am not Romeo,
That when I have been the most glorious Romeo of all days,
I am no other than Romeo, and that I cannot say the following,
O Romeo!
What word could I learn it by in rhyme?

ROMEO. What word could I learn it by in rhyme?

ROMEO. What word could I learn it by in rhyme?

ROMEO. What word could I learn it by in rhy


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Ros.

I cannot tell thee.


ROMEO.
What news may the news tell thee?
What news?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.
A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?

ROMEO.

A messenger from heaven?


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ING a SAND, to his eyes with a golden ring, that which the wind hath upon it, and which he hath left in his hand, with a precious crown. Then the lad beheld him; and a great tower, or tower, that was in heaven, was he there; and it was so.

ROMEO: And I will show you, O God! O thou the Lord, and thou hast slain so many in the name of the Mercutio, and hast despised mine name so iniquitous, that I may prove myself a holy man?

ROMEO: What did I kill, then?

ROMEO: No; I did not.

ROMEO: Then tell me, why have you been cast down?

ROMEO: I know not, for I am not guilty.

ROMEO: Why, thou speakest me, and I will not.

ROMEO: But I will tell thee, I will stand here with thee till I am satisfied.

ROMEO: Is there not much?

ROMEO: I will not doubt it, though I be not satisfied; for I have no reason to be satisfied; but I will tell thee.

ROMEO: Which of these, methinks he, is the Prince of Capulet, and will kill thee.

ROMEO: What of Capulet?

ROMEO: Do not trust me, for he hath been slain, and many of the Capulet’s own children have perished.

ROMEO: Which shall he then kill, with the Prince’s death’s bones?

ROMEO: The Prince of Capulet, with the bones which were slain.

ROMEO: How doth he know my name?

ROMEO: O swear, he will not tell me.

ROMEO: Then come, help me. Stay till thou knowest. I’ll kill thee, and my heart is satisfied.

ROMEO: Is not the matter done?

ROMEO: I’ll be satisfied.

ROMEO: But why? What’s that?

ROMEO: I will be satisfied.

ROMEO: Tell me, where is Capulet?

ROMEO: I will tell you.

ROMEO: But what of that?

ROMEO: I have been cast down.

ROMEO: Why, O Fortune, Fortune, when thou art there, I will never return, save with thy death.

ROMEO: What’s this? What’s that?

ROMEO: O Fortune!

ROMEO: Did I hide it with my head, or with my hand, and die?

ROMEO: I did not hide it with mine head; I was not buried there.

ROMEO: What’s that?

ROMEO: What’s that?

ROMEO: Did I hide it with my hand?

ROMEO: What’s that?

ROMEO: Did I hide it with mine hand?

ROMEO: It is well with thee, O Fortune, that thou shalt hide it; I beseech thee; that I may convey thee my way.

ROMEO: Hast thou never found him?

ROMEO: I have, thou hast not.

ROMEO: Hast thou not found him?

ROMEO: It is not mine, O Fortune, that thou hast found him.

ROMEO: O God! O Mercutio! What’s this?

ROMEO: I have found thee.

ROMEO: I beseech thee, O Mercutio! What’s this?

ROMEO: I have found thee.

ROMEO: I have found thee.

ROMEO: Is not the matter done?

ROMEO: I have been cast down.

ROMEO: Why, O Fortune, thou hast slain so many in the name of the Mercutio, and hast despised mine name so iniquitous, that I may prove myself a holy man?

ROMEO: What’s this? What’s that?

ROMEO: Did I hide it with my hand, or with mine hand, and die?

ROMEO: I have not hid it with mine head; I was not buried there.

ROMEO: What’s that? What­s that?

ROMEO: It is well with thee, O Fortune, that thou shalt hide it; I beseech thee, O Mercutio! What’s this?

ROMEO: I have found thee.

ROMEO: I have found thee.

ROMEO: Is not the matter done?

ROM


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

July, 2003)

She spoke. She spoke.

She spoke.

He must have said her name more than once.

A word of comfort for her, and a heavy prayer for that of others.

B.

She must have known, for she did not forget, when she had been married to R.
J. I have met thee many times, and am in many many ways the worse for it than thou art.

O, if I were to remember thee, I would not fail thee.

I love thee, and would do so with all my heart.

Henceforth my love shall be with thee,
To make my life happy, and I will be satisfied till my death.

I have yet many hours, and am in many ways the worse for it than thou art.

I cannot fail thee, O madam.

JULIET.
But you know the love-conquering proverb, O wise man,
That the sweetest man of the earth should love a ghost;
Or else, if he have not, it is a bad ghost.

ROMEO.
A lady like her husband, she that marries him, hath the fairest heart.

JULIET.
I am not that. But be satisfied, and have faith, and be content.

ROMEO.
O, then, I am all in; and I see how I should do, if my love should kill me.

JULIET.
O, dear heart, be ready to go on
Your knees. Do not make an account of me!

ROMEO.
Ay, dear heart, tell me what thou canst not tell me.

ROMEO.
Why, love, I will tell you.

JULIET.
O do not love, nor be weary, nor tremble; for love is such a thing,
That that it is as sweet as sweet snow, and no matter what else the wind,
Is so sweet and tender as it were in the air.

ROMEO.
Then where is thy love? O, you know me not.

JULIET.
The truth is, I love thee more than thou.

ROMEO.
Love, when it is so dear to thy heart, breaks it up in love,
Being more than any other thing that lives;
Being so sweet that it is the fruit of thy womb,
And in which thy limbs depend upon that,
The true fruit of that which is life. Thus, too, hath it been a joy,
When love hath grown in thee, and is tender in thy hands.

ROMEO.
That, in this love, is the sweetest fruit that I have ever seen.

JULIET.
What is it, then, that thou so much lovest me,
That thou speakest of me when thou speakest me?

ROMEO.
What then, then, am I? How art thou in such a state?

JULIET.
Is love so bad to me?

ROMEO.
It is; for what cause love is, it is not of my nature,
Nor is it in my nature; it is in man;
In which I am a man, and in which I am a creature;
In which I am a fair man, and in which I am the sun.
Therefore I say to thee, Be my wife, and bear her:
My true love, that thou mayest call me love.

JULIET.
I confess that I have forgot thee.

ROMEO.
For that, and that, and that, and that, and that; and that; and that and that.

JULIET.
Hath thou not spoken to me, I know thee not?

ROMEO.
O, what is it? Didst thou not hear me in my husband’s stead?

JULIET.
Is she not a maiden? What is her name? How is she?

ULIET.
Is she not a boy? I say I know her not,
I have never met a maiden, and yet thou dost love her:
It is not till this night didst thou look again,
And that thy love is gone, thou art come again
To speak with me.

ROMEO.
What, then, is this? I confess thy name,
I have never heard thee speak to me;
And yet thou dost love her.

JULIET.
O thou that hatest me, and not loveth her?

ROMEO.
O thou that loveth me, and not loveth her?

J


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

charactiote or of a holy beast or beast of burden, and I myself am not, in my faith, fit for a vow.

JULIET.
But yet in this world, for which I am holy, but in prison, my faith cannot be strong enough.

ROMEO.
By the wayside, therefore I pray you come out.

JULIET.
But in that world, I cannot stand on my hands.

ROMEO.
By the wayside, then I may stand on yours.

JULIET.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

ROMEO.
O Prince, give me not a word.

ROMEO.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

ROMEO.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

ROMEO.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
O dear sweet knight, I cannot yet tell you the Prince.

ROMEO.
I am very sad, yet I do not think it to be.

JULIET.
Why, but I have a feeling for your poor health, and am not fit for it.

ROMEO.
What? Then you will prove so much worse.

JULIET.
Hail, madam,

ROMEO.
By heaven and earth and in all heaven.

JULIET.
O holy lord, if I may be so bold, so bold
That I may kill
A raven in that night’s wake, it is not to me.

ROMEO.
Hail, madam, what is my place?

JULIET.
My lord, no more.

ROMEO.
What is my place?

JULIET.
It is at thy door, and I am within.

ROMEO.
So, be not yet married.

JULIET.
O good Romeo, tell me my husband.

ROMEO.
O good Romeo, tell me thy husband’s name.

ROMEO.
My father, in this wretched state of soul,
Was, when in my youth, and never again
A man of that name.

ROMEO.
I have now to speak with my father, and with my cousin,
To tell him that he is not of the world, or that I am.

JULIET.
What do you think of him? I will ask that of him again;

ROMEO.
A man of such reputation that I know no more.

JULIET.
But yet, in this world, for which I am holy,
My faith cannot be strong enough.

ROMEO.
But in that world, I cannot stand on my hands.

ROMEO.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
By the wayside, then I may stand on yours.

ROMEO.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
O dear knight, I cannot yet tell you the Prince.

ROMEO.
I am very sad, yet I do not think it to be.

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay, in good faith, not to the Prince.

JULIET.
O dear knight, I cannot yet tell you the Prince.

ROMEO.
I am very sad, yet I do not think it to be.

JULIET.
What counsel can the world in this world afford?

JULIET.
Ay


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Recession.

This makes my point even more poignant in light of the news I read this past month of a group of Republican activists on a stormy night out in Arizona. The sun rose early, and it quickly set.

My wife, whose name is Sarah, and I were in the car sitting on our back porch. Both of them were in the car when I saw the sun, and both were looking at the shore. It was very early in the morning, and we were out, not far from our homes.

When the sun had gone down, we went out to the side and were on our knees.

We did so, and all this with no doubt in our minds that if we were going to stay at home, we would stay at home.

Being an early morning-man, I must have been well informed in my mind of what was going on.

I had come to see myself, and there had been no sun; but I was well aware of the sun, and yet I still do not believe that we are in paradise.

It is true, of course; I am quite well. But that is not what I am, and I am not yet good enough.

My father was a prosperous man; his life was not as good as mine, nor much more prosperous than mine; and that wealth is still in excess of what I shall call what I have.

But that was not my true father; that wealth was not the name that I got from him.

I must say, that I cannot remember what that name was, but I am sure I have some other name.

There are those in heaven who do not hear the name of God, and yet they think he is so.

But he is not so, and they do not know what to do with him.


I think I may be a good, and I may not be so.

I might be the worse.

But I am well.

I feel sorry for my father; I feel sorry for my wife;
I feel sorry for my daughters; I feel sorry for my husband;
And I do not like them so much that I can not feel sorry.

As much as I hate myself, and so much as love them; yet as much as I hate the world so much that I hate myself,
I am never satisfied with anything,
And if I do love them that love me I must love them even worse.

How sad! How sad. How sickening! What do I mean by that!

It is too sad when love dies,
And I have a husband that cannot love me.

But I must love myself. And to do so is no part of this happiness.

I am no longer in this world, I am in Heaven.

This world is too full of happiness.

God would never cease to give it to me, for I am not yet dead,
But now that I am, I have got to do it again.

I am satisfied with myself, I love myself.

My life is but short of perfection.

My life is in my hands.

It is not yet so.

For the love I have I shall never forget that love,
And when my heart grows old, there shall be no time to enjoy it.

And yet I do not hate myself.
Love lives, it dies.
Love lives, it dies, and yet I am in heaven.
Love dies, love dies.
Love dies, love dies.
Love dies, love dies, and yet I am in heaven.


This is what I do, and I will do it again.


I have been in love with thee.

I have been in love with thee.

Love lives, it dies.


Peace, peace, peace!


Peace!
Peace!
Peace!
Peace!
Peace!
Peace!
Peace!


Peace!
Peace!


Peace!
Peace!


Peace!


Peace!
Peace!


Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


Peace!


Peace!

Peace!


===== CHECKPOINT 015 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

asonic.
I would be glad that you should come hither.
In the morning, the hour shall be in the evening.

ROMEO.
My cousin, let me speak with you.

ROMEO.
Ay, and in the afternoon.

ROMEO.
Madam, excuse me, I have had my news with a loss.
I fear for your sake.
’Madam, I have met with a monster
Which is quite too strong to be a gentleman,
And yet too fair to be banished.
Thou cannot bear to have these things, and I
Dispels him of his vanity.
I will send a messenger to help thee,
And if thou wilt return, I will show thee thy love.

ROMEO.
Go, I bid thee come. O sweet Juliet, come hither.

ROMEO.
What is this? Shall I bring thee such a thing?

ROMEO.
A kiss; no hands?

ROMEO.
A kiss? I have no strength.

ROMEO.
O, do you know where I am?
What is this place?

ROMEO.
O, that thou must know. Come hither.

ROMEO.
I pray thee, come hither.

ROMEO.
Ay, if thou thinkest not, take not thy heart out of me.

ROMEO.
Ay, if thou thinkest not, take not thy heart out of me.

ROMEO.
Ay, take not thy heart. Look, my dear Juliet!
Thou mayst not be banished.
Stay, stay, stay. I will make thee a knight.


ROMEO.
Good-bye, Romeo.

ROMEO.
Is there none in thee? How hast he made me so mad?

ROMEO.
He is a true gentleman, a father, and a loving husband;
I am his father, and I will do to him what I have to do,
And if he makes it, I shall be his bride,
And if he fails, I shall do nothing but love him;
And if he fails, I shall be his kinsman,
And that marriage I shall be in, and that my name be immortal.
O, thou art gone, Romeo!’

ROMEO.
I see thy hand is soft upon my breast.
What dost thou think thou mean’st?’

ROMEO.
I think I am gone to the window, to make thee a ring,
And therefore bid thee kiss me. What’s the Prince?

ROMEO.
I shall tell thee what he is. Tell me, what’s his name?


ROMEO.
My dear Juliet, I will not help you with that question.

ROMEO.
It is my friend, my cousin, my mistress, my wife.

ROMEO.
Ay, dear. How do you love him so?

ROMEO.
He says I must make him his bride.
Give me thy hand, and I will make a ring.


ROMEO.
I have promised myself that I will make him the Prince.

ROMEO.
How, then? What is his name?

ROMEO.
He is Romeo, my dear cousin, the Prince of France.

ROMEO.
He speaks like this, with such a passion, that he makes all my heart beat
Like a drum. And he lives a lie.

ROMEO.
Come hither.
Come hither!
How is Romeo?

ROMEO.
What dost thou hear?

ROMEO.
I believe, Juliet.

ROMEO.
O dear Juliet, do not think thou mad;
And, if thou doubtst, see if there is none.
Good-bye, and all my love.

ULIET.
’JULIET.
A sweet man, I fear.

JULIET.
Ay, good-bye.

JULIET.
I will not stand in thy way, but thou hast made up my mind,
To go and marry her again.

JULIET.
Well, gentlemen, the way must be no journey.

JULIET.
Give me thy hand, and I will swear it.

JULIET.
’Is love too good?

JULIET.
’Why, if it is so, I’ll think thee to be a gentleman,
And henceforth a lady.

JULIET.
What’s that?

JULIET


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perce.

I ask you, why, I have no need of the answer;
Therefore, tell me, what shall we have? Shall we have, thou knowest?

Thou art not yet married; I am married to a man,
With my head in heaven,
This is the holy bridegroom that my father calls,
Because I love him with an eye to see the stars;
Which is so dear to my love that she cannot refuse,
Being so many hours in the night.

And yet, if she do love thee, that must be my love.

Now, gentlemen, let us take our leave,
And be married for ever, amen.

For, if I were dead, you would be there.

And if I were dead, my soul would be so cold
That it would take the breath
Of death that I should come to my senses
For it was for that purpose to marry thee.

O, what love dost thou devise to death that thou shouldst marry?

The more thou deny, the more perverse thy hate
Is.

Do thou think me guilty, I say thy love will kill thee?

And that, if that be so, then I can slay thee.

JULIET.
O, if I am not married, and love is not married,
Who shall kill me?

ROMEO.
How, O God, what is my purpose?

JULIET.
My purpose is so simple, that all is well.
I shall never be married, nor shall I have my head in heaven,
For that is yet one hundred times more glorious.
Therefore, let this proverb say thee how I will do it,
And it shall speak truth when I speak it.
Now, gentlemen, if I were dead, you would be there.
For I am, and you are, and I am;
Therefore, tell me, what shall we have? Shall we have, thou knowest?
O, tell me, what shall we have? Shall we have, thou knowest?

ROMEO.
It is not to be. How, then, tell me, what shall we have? Shall we have, thou knowest?

JULIET.
Madam, what if I were dead?

ROMEO.
My purpose is so simple, that all is well.

ROMEO.
What then?

ROMEO.
My purpose is so simple, that all is well.

ROMEO.
What then?
ROMEO.
Madam, what if I were dead?

ROMEO.
No, I am not.

ROMEO.
I know I do.

ROMEO.
Thou shalt not fail me, that thou art in need;
For thy word hath come too late, and thy tongue be too heavy;
Wherefore art thou, then?

ROMEO.
Madam, thou art not dead.

ROMEO.
I shall meet you at the head of this mountain,
And shall speak with you in that way.

ROMEO.
O, what more is that?

ULIET.
JULIET.
O thou wast slain?

JULIET.
I am not. I die, that I may be
My own wife, and that thou mayst have it;
Or if thou art, I shall be the husband.

JULIET.
O good lady, I beseech thee, follow my counsel
With joy.

ROMEO.
Thou shalt not fail me, that thou art in need;
For thy word hath come too late, and thy tongue be too heavy;
Wherefore art thou, then?

JULIET.
I am not dead.

ROMEO.
What shall I have? Shall we have? Shall we have, thou knowest?

JULIET.
Madam, what if I were dead?

ROMEO.

My purpose is so simple, that all is well.

ROMEO.

Madam, what if I were dead?

ROMEO.

Madam, what if I were dead?

ROMEO.

My purpose is so simple, that all is well.

ROMEO.

What then, how come I, such a fool,
So early in life that thou dost teach,
To practise the art of such a skill?

ROMEO.
For I am not.

ROMEO.
By my own skill, thou wilt never teach,
Nor shall thou teach this thou art not yet grown.

ROMEO.
By my own skill, thou


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OdIET.
Your name is Oathen.
I have no other name than thy name;
Wherefore, Oathen, I do vow thee.
Come, stand by me, Oathen, stand by me,
And say to me what thou wilt say,
I want thee to be so rude to me.
I bid thee come, and look on me;
When thou speakest to me, say aloud,
Truly, what of it! And so I am to thee.

Truly, thou art my enemy; for I am the lord of many,
With the strength of a father.

ULIET.
O my heart,
Give me strength to stand at thy back,
And not to take it from thee,
Because thou hast not my help.

EOIET.
O what shall I say then? O my lord, speak quickly!
What shall I say? What, then?
What is that?
What hath come into this? Shall I say it,
As the stars cast their bright stars;
So fair am I? Then, look again, and behold,
This is the fair, fair hill which grows
In this region; this hill hath grown
And I in love; this sweet mountain,
And this hill, the fairest of all,
Is full of all thy beauties. What is this,
If all these things were so?

What shall I say? Take these, and swear them,
To my lord, O holy god!
Take these, and swear them, to thy lord,
To thy holy father, thou God of thy saints.
Take these, and swear them, to thy holy mother!
My holy father, the joy I shall have,
Is nothing else but the love of my joy!

O God, what dost thou hear? Why art thou that
That thou art not so sweet and gentle,
That, in love with me,
Than love in a little child? This is so, I am so,
And yet I am so,
I do swear, for I am a husband.
But what of this? I have sinned,
I have sinned, I have sinned.
It is no sin to marry an unwary,
What I have sinned is even worse!
I should, if I were married to him,
I should have sinned. Such a thing, such a sin,
Would I. Thus I have sinned.
Come, let me say to thee again,
Sweet joy, sweet joy! O, do this now,
As if I had the answer.
Do it now, and say to me how I will do it again.
This, sweet Prince, have mercy upon me!

ROMEO.
Give me that which thou sayest.

ROMEO.
O blessed Virgin, grant me, dear father,
This is thy answer to that question.

ROMEO.
Forgive me, I am very much confounded.

ROMEO.
O blessed lady! What is this?

ROMEO.
Thou sayst me that I may be blessed?

ROMEO.
O Prince, what hath she’d?

ROMEO.
I love her so much, that I am fond of her.
O, what a lovely thing she is!
What doth she wear?
What do we have here? These, in this hour,
I love to lose her, and hate her so.
And yet, in spite of her loving my love,
I am too tender to take her again. Therefore
Give her these, grant me these, give me these,
Give me these, grant me these, grant me these, grant me these, grant me these, grant me these, grant me these.
Hold them, for I love her so much! Then, grant her to me.

ROMEO.
And now for a hundred days, and give her what thou sayest,
Then, be merciful to her and good to thee.

ROMEO.
O love, thou art such a gentleman!

ROMEO.
Love, love, love, love.

ROMEO.
Come, good father! Let my dear Juliet stand in thy presence
And take thy vow.

ROMEO.
How will I help thee? Look, I will look at thee.

ROMEO.
Taste my tongue, tongue, tongue. Think me gone yet.
Now, good father! I hear thee say,
Taste thou my word, tongue; tongue.
Taste thou my word. Here, speak again.
Taste me, tongue.

ULIET.
What is this? O my lord, what is this?


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urseIbrahim, who goes by Abu Bakr, said, “This is my lord. Behold, I have not yet come to his place. Here I will ask your help and help you, and will come to take my kinsman with you. But the price I will pay you will depend upon how rich I am. Look at that.” So he went to the Prophet, who sat up, and he made no answer. When the news came that they were going to seize the house, he went up to the walls to beg them farewell, and said, “O peace, O good brother, be comforted. How can I help you today? I was gone a long time in my love-in-law’s night-wear, and now she is gone. Come, take me out of my nightwear. Let me look in and see what I have in store for you. I am not to be found, and cannot speak for you; but I have some for you and will tell you how I have got her back, and where I can get her. Tell her what I have got and tell me where I must be. It is at this hour that I shall return to you, and you will know that I have put all my heart and spirit into her name, and she is not hers. How can I love you, if I love her only for my own sake?” Then he besought her, and she said, “O, she is my wife. Take my hand, and let her stay. But do not leave me there till I have done my will and that she shall have me, and will therefore be my wife; for I am married, and my soul shall never love thee. I have bought this from you, and this I sell thee. How may I say farewell, O good lady? I may never be satisfied till she is gone, for I hate her too much, but will marry her and keep her company till she is dead, for she hath no love, and that is a sin.


Chapter 13.


I went out, and in the dark, looking at myself, behold my cousin, who is dead, sitting there in my bosom; and the world is a dream, and I am gone, and I am not there now, and my father is gone, and my mother is gone. Do I not know it is my cousin, for he came from heaven in my youth, and I saw him going up to my cousin, and was like a ghost, till I behold him gone. How hast I come? It is in heaven. Then, behold my cousin, and it is not in heaven, for I saw him going up to my cousin, and was like a ghost, till I behold him gone. How hast I come? It is in heaven. Then, behold my cousin, and it is not in heaven, for I saw him going up to my cousin, and was like a ghost, till I behold him gone.


Chapter 14.


Then the day was ready, and I went to pray. It was a sad night; and at some time, when the sun was still shining, the world was gone. So I made haste, and came to the sun, and beholding the sun, I saw him going up to my cousin, and was like a ghost, till I saw him gone.

I said, O good lad, I am going back to my cousin, and I shall marry him and keep him company till he is dead. Then am I gone, and I am not there now, and my father is gone, and my mother is gone, and my father is gone, and my mother is gone.

Wherefore, have I gone away from thee, for in the night thou wilt die, and the earth shall move, and my cousin shall never be there, and I shall never be there again, and my father shall never be there again, and I shall not have the strength to live again.

Do not believe that thou art gone.

’I have come again, and am not there now. O good Romeo! I come again again, and am not there now. O good Romeo!


CHAPTER 15.


I have come, and am not there now. O good Romeo! I have come again, and am not there now. O good Romeo!


CHAPTER 16.


O my soul! O, I am gone from thee.


CHAPTER 17.


And yet there I am, a pilgrim,
And the world is gone.

I have come, and am not there now.


CHAPTER 18.


My journey to God;

I do not see him, but think it is for my own sake.

My eyes look on him that goes, and I tell him,
If it be for my own sake, why hast I come? What is his purpose?

This is my


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Friedrich Theophrastus
He must have been the youngest.
But not to say that he could not yet do such an thing.
If it were so, there was no excuse.
He saw that every breath was as close to him as the wind;
And to add an ill to it would be a much more glorious sight
To have him bound at the bottom of the earth.
But yet, as his heart grows soft with hatred toward men,
It is no worse than this; when the tyrant dies,
The rest of his kinsman, his kinsman,
And all his wealth be forfeit; but when he lives,
The earth shall burn and the stars shall have no breath.
But this would not be worse;
For it is written, That if men should be found slain,
It is as though they were dead, but this is not so.
JULIET.
Ay, no, Juliet, I love you,
It is as if all my love had gone out of my lips.
And yet, if anything do be found,
Shall I send her back with a torch?
Henceforth I shall not be slain; but what else shall I say?
My love.

EO.
Thou art not Romeo.
But he was.

EO.
I think I may add that he is not, that he shall never be,
That he must be Romeo and Juliet.

JULIET.
Ay, then, tell me now. I am an acquaintance.

O, good lord, I love you as well as I love myself,
For I am no less dear than Romeo.

JULIET.
O, what hast thou gone to meet me? Why, poor man, thou hast gone to marry me.

JULIET.
Henceforth I must send back a messenger, and he will be come for my lady.

JULIET.
O, tell me. Why art thou there?

JULIET.
Come, Romeo, excuse me, for it is no need,
For, if I were no more dear, thou art gone.

JULIET.
What hast thou come to my lady? It is a poison,
Of such an abhorred kind; and it comes out from the lips of a poor fellow.
I will make thee poison,
And then I will come to thee and poison thee with it;
And therefore it hath no poison in my veins.
Thou knowest nothing, thou art none; for this is no way,
For, what poison is in my blood,
To make poison? No, poison, poison, poison!
Take, poison, poison!

EO.
O, my dear friend, and this is the reason why I have come.

JULIET.
Is not poison, then, poison? Or can I,
Being in my state,
In some other manner convey this poison,
It is not in my veins.

EO.
What poison is in your veins?

JULIET.
Madam, you are too impatient.
Madam, how doth my cousin die?

JULIET.
Come, come, dear. How do I?

JULIET.
I am very sorry to have my death be at hand.

JULIET.
Then send for me.
Madam, I shall be found soon dead.

JULIET.
This is a dreadful request,
I should never have been such a man.

EO.
What doth your cousin die?

JULIET.
She is rich, and she is quite fit,
As I know well what a gentleman is.
Come, tell me, who are thy kinsmen?

EO.
O, dear friend, what poison doth your cousin die?

JULIET.
Ay, ay, poison.
Come, I beseech thee.


JULIET.
Come, Romeo, come, Romeo.

EO.
What is my father’s poison,
To poison him?

JULIET.
What is my father’s poison,
To poison him? I mean to ask thee.

JULIET.
What are thy father’s poisons?

JULIET.
What am my father’s poisons?

JULIET.
Ay, all right, I’ll give thee them.
Come, come, Romeo.

EO.
Nay, Romeo. Good sir, if thou wilt.

ROMEO.
Ay, good sir, if thou wilt.

ROMEO.
I


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typically to be found in most states. It is a blessing to behold. There are many in our state that have their hands and lives well served by this.

ROMEO.
I confess with many a smile, to hear from this little gentleman, that he is rich, fair, and full of grace. I think therefore, that his modesty makes him a saint. He was born in this state; and he hath so rich a heart and his soul to be so rich and full of joy. But yet, I beseech you, he is rich.

ROMEO.
And if he were so rich, my heart would have been much more fair.

ROMEO.
O blessed blessed saint,
Thou wast so rich to be here,
To live there.

ROMEO.
Ay, if thou wilt, I pray thee,
I will take thy cloak and bring thee back.
Go thou and be my lord and my confessor,
Then come hither, and take up my mantle,
And teach me thy counsels.

ROMEO.
I know thee well, and thou art very fond of me,
Because I have often said thee should come hither.
But if thou wilt, I beg thee farewell.

ROMEO.
Ay, good lord, be gone, for I am bound,
Being here to-morrow.

ROMEO.
What, then, says I, what is thy purpose?

ROMEO.
I can tell thee only that I will give you my hand
And call upon thee in return,
And thou shalt have my hand in thy wedding ring.
But the ring shall fail, and I shall die.

ROMEO.
O, that will be so. What of this?

ROMEO.
I am going to take thee to thy bed,
And lie thee there till I shall come.

ROMEO.
Good night.

ROMEO.
As you may, I beseech you, I will pray thee,
Which I am yet yet unworthy of,
For I never should have met thee
In this state, nor was I there till thou didst ask it.
Now I have begun to think of thee.

ROMEO.
I know thou dost love me, and yet I am not satisfied.


ROMEO.
Ay, yet thou art satisfied.

ULIET.
I shall have no love for thee.

ROMEO.
I am, and I will have no love.

ULIET.
I know not what thou meanest by that.
What is it, that thou art so fond of me?

ROMEO.
By a love-sick woman, I do mean to prove,
That thou art not so fond of me.
I never did love thee so much,
But thou art such a jealous heart that thou art a poor thing.

ROMEO.
If I were a beggar and thou were a rich man,
I should starve to death in this world.
I would do that to thee, if thou wouldst give me this hand.

ROMEO.
Ah, but thou wilt not.

ROMEO.
I am sorry that thou do think this;
For I am married, so that thou mayest be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Is there not a man here whom I love more than myself?
Do I have a love-devouring father,
And yet thou cannot love him more than me?
I wonder, O, what a villain that thou hast.

ROMEO.
Not loving love is the best remedy.

ULIET.
Madam, there is another, more wicked
In her heart than thou lovest:
For she saw what thou saw and married her cousin,
Being a murderer and a mensch.
’Madam, thou art much too gentle.

ROMEO.
I swear to thee, dear mother, that my cousin
May never be so gentle.

ROMEO.
I, dear mother, have come to this resolution.

ROMEO.
My cousin, may I tell you, is married.

ROMEO.
Ah, that I must confess. That thou mayest be so gentle.
My cousin, this lady, is a murderer,
And is so well known to those who know her.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, lady, that I may be so gentle.

ROMEO.
The gentleman, if he hear of my cousin’s death,
Should marry me. This is my cousin, and I am married.

ROMEO.
Indeed, good sir, my cousin. I do not think thou wouldst consent.

ROMEO.


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Inquiry, and the Case Against the Church

A brief summary of the early case in the early years of the Church

The question of the validity of this motion shall be before the Lord

JULIET.
Do you think, sir, that my Lord has the power to grant a motion, or a proof thereof, without a warrant?

JULIET.
I will not deny it.

JULIET.
I must ask you again, sir.

JULIET.
Your counsel may grant no such motion.

JULIET.
I will not delay; I will not do it.

JULIET.
In a word, I cannot.

JULIET.
What excuse can you give me, that I may do this?

JULIET.
That you should excuse me? That I may not make my motion?

JULIET.
Why, why, why, why? Why have I such an opposition?

JULIET.
Do I not, when I may?

JULIET.
If I have, and I be gone, and do not know what to do, I will confess my love to thee;
And then thou shalt answer me, in my prayer.

JULIET.
In thy heart of my heart
Give me my peace.

JULIET.
But now, I will not make the contrary vow.
’Tis a bold request, if thou grant it.

JULIET.
No man should attempt that.

JULIET.
But I know, and thou art bound to thy resolution.

JULIET.
Amen.
O dear sisters, my prayer is well with thee.

JULIET.
How can I not be bound to thee, to thee?

JULIET.
I confess to thee that thy love’s sake is my need;
That my love’s love, which thou must love for thy own sake,
May procure thee a word of comfort, and that’s all for myself.
I trust, if thou helpst me, that thou canst bear it.
If thou grant this, thou wilt be satisfied.

JULIET.
O, blessed heart! What joy shall that be when a man dies.

JULIET.
What joy?

JULIET.
I am not satisfied; I cannot help feeling guilty.

JULIET.
Art thou satisfied?

JULIET.
Henceforth thou shalt ask it again.

JULIET.
That is what I am; my faith is faith in thy name.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, Ay, Ay. Let me know, O my soul.

JULIET.
I know you are not satisfied; do not despair, or I shall say I am not.

JULIET.
Art thou satisfied?

JULIET.
And what is it that thou art so fond of?

JULIET.
What doth your love mean by that? I do not believe it.

JULIET.
I may say more than you say; I do not wish to lose the peace of thy heart.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay. O, what a wretched state I am.
’Ay, ay, ay.

JULIET.
How can I not be satisfied? How can I not feel guilty?

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay.

JULIET.
Art thou satisfied?

JULIET.
How? O, what joy shall that be when a man dies?

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay.

JULIET.
O joy, that thou hast struck the sweetest pitch of joy.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay.

JULIET.
That is it, then, that thy love doth say I am not satisfied,
’Ay, ay, ay, ay, Ay.
I have no word to make thee swear, and it is mine own,’s.

JULIET.
Do thou therefore swear my love, or my love’s vow, that I will swear it?

JULIET.
Do thou therefore swear my love, or my love’s vow, that I will swear it?

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay.


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dealing. That is not the same.

And yet what he spoke, I cannot say.

’Tis not the best,

’Tis true I say, but I shall make it so.

’Gentlemen, if the matter be in my power
To kill him in my stead,
I will do so.

’But what of my kinsman’s wife?

’I must answer that, if she is at all hers,
That I am not the one.

’But I will ask her in marriage what she calls,
That she be found;’’
’And shall I believe her name?

’I would ask her to marry,
And not marry,’’ But marry.

’Is she not well? If she be,
I will find her
And send her hither,’’’’’’’’’
The lady with whom she is married,
That may procure her peace.


’It is not that well.

’’Farewell, gentlemen; it is not so.


LORD


How shall our lady be buried,
She says I ask,
And I am bound to answer
That it is her;
And I may not tell her.

’Tis my lady, that she is gone;
And that she is not gone.

’But when she sees the pale face,
She says I should not kill her,
Because of her hate.

JULIET


Is this true?

I am not sure;
I am struck by a sudden blush,
Like to take in a new face.


JULIET


What is it that you say to that?




Hush, how doth it be, O villain’s ghost,
Where the fiend calls his name,
To bring back a dead man?




JULIET


Ay, cousin, I will tell thee what thou wilt tell me.

Thou knowest too well what to say.

JULIET


By God, I do swear you know,
The word of thy word is mine.

JULIET


That word’s name is mine,
That’s name’s substance.

JULIET


I swear it never again.

JULIET


I swear it thou hast never spake,
That thou art not Romeo.

JULIET


And, if thou love’st me, thou shalt send me greetings.

JULIET


Is that so? Hast thou not Romeo now,
For he is gone?

JULIET


Good night. That’s what thou hast heard.


JULIET


Ay, cousin, I swear I am not Romeo.

JULIET


Good night.


JULIET


Briefly.

ROMEO


Come, now, Friar!



ROMEO


This is my Prince?


ROMEO


O sweet Juliet, tell me, is my love so dear?

ROMEO


And where is my heart, that so tenderly enraptures me
So I should blush at the sight of him?

ROMEO


He is gone. I, therefore, hast left him.
My true love, Romeo, is gone too.

ROMEO


My heart loves thee as much as I do,
I am sure he be gone, and I shall never be with him.

ULIET


Why, O sweet Juliet! What of it?

ROMEO


’Till he is gone and gone well,
I trust no more of thy love than I do.

ROMEO


What, then, was thou the first Romeo I found?

ROMEO


No doubt, I should have known his name,
And, at that moment, that he should love me as he loved himself.

ROMEO


O, what of this? What should I do?

ULIET


Well, I have no remedy,
Or what shall I do?

ROMEO


Or, that I might be thy friend,
If thou wilt marry, and have her be gone,
Then by this means will I be your father again.

ULIET


What will I? O Prince, what will I?

ROMEO


Ay, I


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consequ to the general direction in which the government should take care,

I hope, that, by this resort, I may be prevented from going into all the

disturbing excesses and perils which have ensconced me on my present

road, and that from henceforth I may be as far from the extremes
as can be laid upon them.

JULIET.
What more would I wish?

ROMEO.
By God, if my heart were so wise,
That I might well live in paradise,
But I will not love to die in my love;
Therefore, my heart lives well, and I do not die.

JULIET.
My heart is well, I say; I am going to heaven.

ROMEO.
That is not true. It is true that I am in heaven;
That there are many saints, and that I may come
To be satisfied; for there is yet an enemy,
For I think I am in prison, and I am not in heaven.

ROMEO.
The walls are made of the earth; for this reason the earth
Fell upon the sea; but that they shall not be made out
In like manner with their substance. And hence all that
Is in heaven is hollow.

ROMEO.
Is not so, that there should seem so much noise in
That my heart should revolve
Upon my neighbour as he breathes.

JULIET.
And my body, so well laid up, is more rich than this,
For I was not born in this world;
Therefore, if I die, I shall be burnt in hell.

ROMEO.
O, what news, that hath struck me that is near? O tell me
That there is nothing there, that thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst bury me in hell
And drown me in the deep?
O, so bad that I am so near, and thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in hell
And bury me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near, and thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst kill me
With a poison? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me with a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep?
O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst drown me in the deep?
O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep? O, so bad that I am so near,
And thou shouldst kill me
With a knife, and thou shouldst drown me in the deep?

JULIET.
Nay, I think you would, and yet I confess that
I cannot live on that account. Yet, methinks thou wilt,
And yet thou wilt speak so well of me.

ROMEO.
O, good men, I cannot think well of thee.

ROMEO.
What shall I do? What shall I do?

ROMEO.
What will thou say of me?

ROMEO.
What will thou say of me that thou have not yet laid eyes on me,
And yet have not yet laid eyes on me?

ROMEO.
Well, thou art not quite so far along.

ROMEO.
Is not that not true?

ROMEO.
I will.
ROMEO.
What shall thou say of me, that thou hast not yet laid eyes on me?

ROMEO.
Good man, be


===== CHECKPOINT 016 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

277.

Romeo,

I am your lord.

I cannot tell you this before
But, Friar, I do have a thing to ask.
JULIET.
Farewell,
And if you can stay till the day I shall tell
Your ghostly cousin, how I shall meet thee again tomorrow
When I shall speak with thee of your death.

ROMEO.
What is it? Shall I have your favour
Upon the morrow?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee. I bid thee farewell,
But before I return tomorrow
I shall be banished for hanging
My name above the heads of my ancestors.
I will take you out of your body and bury you
In a vault on the hill where my ancestors,
I beseech thee, with my death-gouging heart,
Thou wilt die in exchange for the grave
That is your cousin Friar, and I will keep thee
With a thousand scars to prove your behalf.

ROMEO.
That will it.

ROMEO.
If the matter be not yet so, and I cannot procure
Than this I will have them for the grave in my hand.

ROMEO.
Give me your hand, dear father;
Let me use it as I am wont.

ROMEO.
Your hands are heavy; my lips sound soft,
My joints are heavy, my sinews are heavy.

ROMEO.
So I have not the strength to weep
And so I have no strength to stand in the way.
But you have my strength; let me speak.

ROMEO.
If that is what you mean, then it is true,
And if not, what am I to be ashamed of?

ROMEO.
What, pray, mayhap I am to have thee speak in such a manner?

ROMEO.
A confession, and not of this world,
I beseech thee to confess me by such a deed
That thou art my cousin, and let me perform it
Upon this earth.

ROMEO.
My dear lord, I know what thou sayest.


EO.
Give me my hand, dear father;
Let me use it as I am wont.

ROMEO.

Good, gentle sir, let me be your seal.

ROMEO.
No matter what, thou art bound to tell the tale
That thou wilt prove true.

ROMEO.
This is enough. Tell me where thou wast slain.

ROMEO.
I have laid thee to death on a bed of rocks,
And that thou wilt not move in the direction
To bury me.

ROMEO.
What, then, canst thou tell me where thou wast slain?

ROMEO.
Wherefore, Romeo?

ROMEO.
What, thou hast a doubt?

ROMEO.
This was the tomb of one slain by mine hands
And I should not know how
So sudden and sudden it did come.
It is the dead whose lips I have slain,
That I should swear I saw before my eyes
That the poison which I have slain
Was a murder that was drunk
By some poison-gathering fellow, and that I saw
Upon the bed of rocks.

ULIET.
O God! Is there a ghostly fellow
Within thy walls? That is me. I love thee.

ROMEO.
O, my lord, be gone, farewell.

ROMEO.
I have found a rich treasure deep in thy bosom,
And yet thou must conceal it from me,
If thou wilt confess me to thee.

ROMEO.
I bid thee farewell,
But before I return tomorrow
I shall be banished for hanging
My name above the heads of my ancestors.
I will take you out of your body and bury you
In a vault on the hill where my ancestors, I beseech thee,
Thou wilt die in exchange for the grave
That is your cousin Friar, and I will keep thee
With a thousand scars to prove your behalf.

ROMEO.

That will it.

ROMEO.

If the matter be not yet so, and I cannot procure
Than this I will have them for the grave in my hand.

ROMEO.

Give me your hand, dear father;

Let me use it as I am wont.

ROMEO.

Your hands are heavy; my lips sound soft,
My joints are heavy, my sinews are heavy.

ROMEO.

So I have not the strength to weep
And so I have no strength to stand in the way.


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Snow. O no! Be gone; there is more to be done. Stay here till I be gone, and send me again a letter.


ROMEO. O lord, what have I?


JULIET. What is it?

ULIET. It is my lady.

JULIET. What is it?

ULIET. Poor lady!

JULIET. Why should I send her to fetch thee?

JULIET.
Go but before I come to thee.
What I am to thee?

JULIET. O thou madman!
O thou that art jealous,
That with my hand I may not use thee,
That thou art more cunning than myself.
Come, give me my letter; and I will send it.

ULIET. Ay, sweetheart!

EO.
Ay, lord! That thou art, and I know it.
Give me a hand, that thou mayst give it.

A ring? Poor man, I cannot remember that name,
But I know that thou dost remember it,
And henceforth I may prove thee right.
Thou knowest it well, my dear cousin;
But thou art not Romeo, the man I am,
Being married to Capulet.
What should I do with thy lady? It is my vow.
Give me thy letter again, and I will furnish it.

This is a heavy burden, and I will never forget it.
My true love will make this a dream come true;
And it is but such a dream that thou willst forget it.

EO.
My lady, I am in love,
And I know it well, but I cannot speak well.
Therefore I bid thee pardon me,
And I must.

EO.
Ay, good, good. Let me take thy hand again.

ULIET.

ULIET. O, what hast I done?

ROMEO.
’O, that is what I have done,
Because thou dost know what thou dost mean,
And thou art no longer with me.

What? What didst thou do, that thou didst tell me?
I am not so far out of breath,
And what shall I say? Shall I tell thee?

ROMEO.
What doth I say?

ULIET.
Well, good Nurse, tell me.

ROMEO.
My dear Rosaline,—
How was my stay here?
How well I saw thee? What didst thou do?

ROMEO.
Didst thou tell me, Rosaline?

ROMEO.
How were you? Did thou not tell me what I should do?

ROMEO.
How? What didst thou do?
’Tis an excellent question.
I may tell thee.

ROMEO.
How was I? How doth my father, and what did he do,
How dost thou tell him?

ULIET.
I have begun this request, and when thou wilt consent,
I shall have thee attend.
O good Nurse, I beseech thee for help.

EO.
What is it that thou dost ask?

ULIET.
The man I love.

EO.
Madam, if I may speak,
I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
O Fortune!

EO.
If thou wilt not hear from me,
This letter is too late, and that is why I cannot meet.
But if thou wilt not speak, speak.
For I am not yet married; nor shall I die.
Therefore shall I not refuse to speak to thee.
If I may speak, speak.
What doth speak speak? How doth thou speak?
Or should I speak again?
O my soul, if I may speak, speak.

ROMEO.
What doth speak?

ROMEO.
Is love not a mark of modesty,
Or a vow, which a gentleman shall take?
Or is it a tender embrace,
To speak from love without consequence?
For to speak from love is to speak modesty.

ULIET.
Ay, good Nurse, speak again.

ROMEO.
If I may speak, speak again.

ULIET.
Why, for what purpose? Why, for a wife?

ROMEO.
For a wife.

ULIET.
My dear Rosaline,—
How were you? What dost thou speak?

ROMEO.
By what means, O gentleman?

ROMEO.
By what means? How can you tell?

ROMEO.
I am sorry indeed, poor Juliet.

UL


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

floods

But when I saw it with my own eyes, it spoke with a voice I did not hear
But I could not have imagined.

Henceforth, they are the daughters of my kinsmen.
It is written, that the man that doth not love thee
Makes thee forfeit thy place
In a palace or a hill,
As if I were there.

EO.


Tis strange that love should move so quickly to a passing enemy,
That, if thou hast yet met him,
Let him kill thee at once.

Wilt thou then send me a messenger with the word?


ROMEO.


How then, madam?


EO.


If that which thou doest speak is true,
My heart shall tremble with hate.
It is not that I should feel love,
Because my love hath a name
That is hateful in my bosom;
Therefore do I take it upon myself to hate it.

EO.


Ay, madam, but thou wilt do it,
Because I am more hateful to thee than I am to thee.

ROMEO.


My heart hath more hatred for thee
than I hate myself for thee.
Therefore love, love, love.

EO.


I love thee, love, and do love thee as thou hast love.

EO.


The maids of thy house, sitting crossly,
Farewell! It is my mother,
That I should love thee. Love, love, love.

ULIET.


What joy doest thou have in this world?

ULIET.
Not yet. And yet it is still in motion.

ROMEO.


Ah, Juliet, Juliet, Juliet. Juliet, Juliet, Juliet. Juliet, Juliet!

ULIET.


Thou art still with me, and yet no such voice to call thee,

But yet yet such noise, to make me laugh.

ROMEO.


It was my uncle Capulet that made the voice.

ROMEO.


Come, Juliet! Come hither, Juliet! Come hither, Juliet! Come hither, Juliet! Come hither, come hither, Juliet!

ULIET.
Come hither, Juliet!

EO.


The light that doth the dark hangs like a candle;
And yet no one will hear it,
Not even Juliet himself.

ULIET.


What news? The villain is dead.
JULIET.


The news is, O, what is this?

ULIET.


Why? Why, for my cousin is dead.

JULIET.


O, what news?

JULIET.


I am sorry, O poor widow! O, my cousin is dead!
She is but half-dead. It is so, and yet no one will hear it,
Not even Juliet himself.
The light that doth the dark hangs like a candle;
And yet no one will hear it,
Not even Juliet himself.

EO.


But how? O that is quite so. I am gone.

JULIET.


Why, then? Why, for my cousin is dead.

JULIET.


O, what news?

JULIET.
O good morrow! I have heard many voices,
And yet no one will hear it.
Therefore, go and look, and let me hear it.

EO.


I hear it well.
O, so do I.

ULIET.
Ay, my lord, thou art dead.

JULIET.


O sweet Nurse, if thou mayst hear,
I beseech thee in thy behalf.

EO.
Come, O Nurse, come hither.
A kiss that thou art not yet ready to take
Must be my wedding day, when thou mayst marry again
Doth it be that my love hath grown too old
To be of such a comfort? Hast thou no tears?

JULIET.


O that thou wilt hear, that thou mayst bear it.

EO.
O, I will prove it, O true Nurse!

ULIET.
Ay, my lord, thou art dead.

JULIET.


I shall hear it well.

JULIET.
Ay, my lord, thou art dead.

ULIET.


Come, come, come hither.

EO.


O Romeo! What was thy heart?

ROMEO.


Well, it seems my heart is too short.

ROMEO.


Come, come hither, come hither.

ULI


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Lazarus.

What a fool I am, O thou what sin I have made! Thou art guilty of me, O thou that art the devil! Thou art the father’s murderer! Thou art my child, and I am with thee;
But I am sick and in need! I am the Prince’s enemy; and thou, the Prince’s enemy,
Doth have my back and cannot stand the love of my father,
Wherefore be so wise, O Prince!
Thou art so rash in his ways, and in his words I’ll slander thee!
Thou art the sickly Prince, the fiend, the fiend’’s enemy; and the Prince’s enemy,
Doth possess me, and do I love thee?

Yet is not Romeo sick, or is not Romeo mad?
Yet is not I’s Juliet’s husband, or is not Juliet’s husband?
Is not my childhood Romeo’s love a sin?
Is not Juliet’s father’s love a sin?

O Romeo, O my dearest love! Let me make you myself.
O Romeo, give me thy heart.
My heart is holy. Thou art holy. I am holy.
What shall I say?
Why, I love thy heart, but thou do not love me.
O Prince, thou hast done me wrong.
How’st thou not Romeo’s heart in love with me?
Is there not Romeo’s heart in love with thee?
Whither hast thou come hither?
O Juliet!
What’er hast thou done to my heart?
Is not Romeo’s heart in love with thee?
O Romeo! O Romeo! O Romeo! O Romeo!
How’st thou not Romeo’s heart in love with thee?
O’er I’ll weep, and I’ll bury thee in hell.
Is there not Romeo’s heart in love with thee?

O’er I will bury thee in hell!

I will, indeed, kill thee, and I will kill thee with all my strength.
O O, let me speak.

Thou have’st’st’st’st’st’st’st not to speak.
Hear me, I do not mean to speak, for I am unworthy to speak.

How then, do you speak with me?

ULIET.
O, what’er is the matter, pray’st?

ROMEO.
What didst thou say, O Romeo?

ROMEO.
O Romeo, what’er was I heard?

ROMEO.
’Fain be thy rage!

ROMEO.
It is not mine, I tell thee.

ULIET.
Art thou no longer Romeo?

ROMEO.
The time’s passing, and the sun upon earth, and all things above it, is the first daylight in the world.

ULIET.
I would do thee a grave apology.

EO.
Ay, ay, I’ll be damned; I would swear to thee that thou wilt not die of the pains I have enjoin’d upon thy womb.
It is not but a dream. O my lord, my soul is environ­d with poison, and I am sick, and thou art not at liberty, yet shall I be with thee.
Wherefore, my dear father? Is not my mother sick?

ROMEO.
What is it? Why, no doubt.

ROMEO.
By that word thou speak’st to me, I shall be sold; and thou shalt not have my child.

ROMEO.
O, come, tell me!
Wherefore, thou knowest that thy life, and thy soul’s, are in debt.

EO.
Art thou my villain?

ROMEO.
If thou art not mad, then prove me not.
But in truth, that thou wilt not do this, let me be sold.

ROMEO.
Ay, ay, I pray thee. I have no reason to wish it; but you know it is not of mine business.

EO.
Ay, Ay!

ULIET.
And so thou shalt know.
’Farewell.
’ROMEO.
I will leave you, Nurse.


EO.
Hear her!

ROMEO.
O tell me not, Nurse.
I’ll do all in thy power to help you.

ROMEO.
My strength shall be thy strength.

ROMEO


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ileaks,
“My enemy, O Prince, is not with me,
And my handmaid;
But be not so bold, O Tybalt, as thou art with him
In all this fray.

Give him light poison, and tell me that Tybalt
Wilt take the poison.

Therefore if I, or the rest, be slain
With Tybalt, give him light poison,
And tell me that Tybalt shall be slain.

I will be slain with him, and Romeo slain with him,
Wherefore, I ’ll call thee to thy name
And bid thee bid me give light poison.”

EO.
O Prince, what joy, when the trumpet calls your name?

And what joy, when the news of my victory
Is on the lips of all the world?

ROMEO.
But I do dream’st not;
It is too late, too late.

ROMEO.
But my faith is broken,
Because of Tybalt’s death;
I do not forget him, or anything else.

ROMEO.
How hast thou forgot him?
’Farewell, farewell, farewell.

ROMEO.
Stay with me, I beseech thee,
And if thou dost not, leave me alone.
If thou canst tell me what thou dost know,
Either I shall tell thee all or none.
If thou knowest what thou dost not know,
Either thou mayst learn how to be good and noblemen.

ULIET.
Madam, my cousin, what news?

ROMEO.
What news?

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse! Nurse, what news?

ROMEO.
O Fortune! Fortune! I am woo’d,
Too good at her that I am.
But farewell, good Nurse. O, farewell.

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse, what news?

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse!

ROMEO.
And farewell, good Nurse!

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, farewell, farewell.

ROMEO.
What news?

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse!

ROMEO.
What news?

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse!

ROMEO.
Well then, farewell, good Nurse!

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, farewell, farewell.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, farewell, farewell.

ROMEO.
Hail Mercutio, farewell, farewell.

ROMEO.
God, what sorrow of a good one
To be slain by another’s hand!

ROMEO.
Indeed is so, O Mercutio!
Thou art such a sweetheart to me.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, farewell, farewell.

ROMEO.
O Romeo, how have thou wert in a state of despair?

ROMEO.
For some reason I should forget what thou hast said,
Being here in the world, thou wilt not talk.
Therefore I will, and I beseech thee,
I will confess my sin.

ROMEO.
I will confess it to thee. Therefore, farewell.

ROMEO.
O Prince, what sorrow of a good one
To be slain by another’s hand!
Therefore I will, and I beseech thee,
I will confess my sin.
Therefore, farewell.

EO.
My lord, what did I tell you tonight?
Thou hast made such a dreadful man’s prisoner,
That he may not take the peace that thou gave him.
What dost thou think that I should give it me in exchange?
O poor Romeo, I would much more than give him this peace,
Thou wast so despised that thou couldst not use it.
O therefore, give me another.

ROMEO.
Thou hast despised me that hath despised me
Since I gave thee such a word to speak.
Thou speakest of me so unworthy.
O, that, if thou art my lord,
I should do more in exchange than give thee this word:
I would much more than give thee this word.

O, that, if thou art my lord,
I should do more in exchange than give thee this word:

I would much more than give thee this word.

ULIET.
O Fortune! Fortune! O blessed Fortune!
How canst thou know what thou art doing?

ROMEO.
By flattering myself, and in greeting
Some measure flattering myself:
Yet as Fortune speaks, so


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Krishna

Thou hast the strength of an enemy

To use such a rude foe
To be thy enemy,
And to be a gentleman like thyself.

Hearken, father, to thy modesty.


JULIET.
O sweet Juliet!
I cannot bear to look upon thee so plainly!

I am sorry in thinking that thou art so dainty;
But do not blush, for I know thou art fair,
Because thou art so fair.
I am, therefore, so sad to hear thee speak.
What news, then, that may send me back?
Well, let me hear.’’ Here’s for thee,
That thou mayst hear it.

JULIET.
And my cousin, that thou mayst know me,
I beseech thee to send him back,
For I have love, as well as fear,
Which thou so violently adores.
But thou sayest so.

JULIET.
I have much love, but fear not,
Because thou hast a more hateful hate
Than me, whose true love thou hast sought.

JULIET.
My love hath a hateful hate
To the best of all I possess,
Which I can love without being hateful,
Unless I prove it by some deed.

JULIET.
Ah, madam, I should be displeas’d,
As I would be mad, if I spoke but what I have.
So when thou art satisfied with thy resolution,
Let me go with thee to the Church,
And see what it is, that thou thinkest well of me.

JULIET.
Nay, madam, I will confess it.

JULIET.
Ay, if it be true, then I would have thee confess,
That thou art rich, and I shall have thee swear,
That I am all-proud, and thou art so rich
That I am going to die with thee.

ULIET.
Ay, madam, this is what I should say.

ULIET.
Come hither, poor man; come hither, thou wilt not return.

ROMEO.
Come hither, poor man, come hither,
So early that thou mayst look upon me,
And that thou mayest see that my face,
The bottom of my breast, is sore wrung with shame.

ROMEO.
I will not, nor would I if thou should,
For I am too late; but when I shall be,
It is I who shall send thee there,
And that thou mayst know where I shall lie.

ULIET.
O, let me pray thee not so bad a hand
As with many of thy wounds.
It is, and I know not what to do with thee.
What may I do with my own hands?

ROMEO.
O, give me your hands, and I will make thee rest.
If thou have the strength to run,
Then return, poor man, to my native house.
But be not such a gentle word to that gentleman.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, that thou mayst not hurt him again.

JULIET.
Go, Nurse, and fetch my hands.

EO.
I cannot be so sweet.

EO.
O, Nurse, I know thou wilt take them,
But I cannot, nor can I take them from thee.

ULIET.
Ay, Nurse! Nurse, I cannot be so gentle,
And yet not so sweet.

EO.
A gentleman may think it doth not belong to him,
That he may speak of his liking to me.
But to him, I am too poor and weak to speak.
It is for him that I take these;
I would it were more than he, to talk of it.
But he’s too ill for this, and I’ll be sorry.
Give me your hands again, and take your hands.
If thou have the strength to run,
Then return, poor man, to my native house.
But be not such a gentle word to that gentleman.

ROMEO.
O, give me your hands, and I will make thee rest.

ROMEO.

’I will not, nor would I if thou should,
For I am too late; but when I shall be,
It is I who shall send thee there,
And that thou mayst know where I shall lie.

ULIET.
O God! I know how thou art bent!

JULIET.
O God! I know how thou art


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Launch-Dock-Tek-Blued-Gravio-Bio-Suit-The-Deathly-Hexes-Island-In-Anchorage.

JULIET.
O God! O that ruleth, this world may be in a state of heavy grief.

ROMEO.
In like manner as I was to behold the Titan I saw it darted in from behind the clouds.
The blackest orb I ever saw saw. It was not there that the sun bore down
Or was it some other cause, but some other thing that made it tremble.
And when my soul saw it, it darted, out of the east,
Out of the west, out of the centre of the earth,
And as I did, yet beholding it darted in.

ROMEO.
What art thou? I am not what thou thinkest,
And I am a false god.

ROMEO.
But be thyself and I will prove thee right,
To be thy friend, to bear and love thee in my presence.

ROMEO.
It is too late, though I may be damned.

ROMEO.
O Fortune! My youth is short, and my sin too long.

ROMEO.
I’ll hurry on, Romeo, or I’ll die.

ROMEO.
As the moon follows the sun, so the heaven follows the earth,
That she may not be struck with earthly pains.
My love is sweet, and my fear full of joy,
And as my love is sweet and full of joy
The heaven behind me grows pale with love’s brightness.
Love’s fair night, fair night!

ROMEO.
’Grief, grief, doom, I am a murderer!

ROMEO.
Give me the knife, for there is no knife for love.

ROMEO.
I am too old, but I am young.

ROMEO.
As I am too old, so come me a new knife,
And make it cut the way that you intend.

ROMEO.
The knife is cut, so be sure.

ROMEO.
I will, and if you kill me, that’s all.

ROMEO.
Ay my lord, but that’s all.

ROMEO.
Thou meanest so much more than I am able to bear.

ROMEO.
Amen.

ROMEO.
Dost thou not see how my ghostly loathing
Directs the light and fury of my life to my hate?
It is a dreadful proof that I am too young.

JULIET.
How art thou, my Romeo? Why dost thou not hear
What thou dost hear me say to thee?

ROMEO.
The truth is that if thou wilt learn of this thou wilt have it.

JULIET.
How dost thou teach me that the heart of a Romeo,
Being such as mine, will ever be mine?

ROMEO.
What of that?

ROMEO.
Why dost thou not have my cousin?

JULIET.
Because he is too young to be Romeo?

ROMEO.
Then tell him, or I’ll say, not so.

JULIET.
By love’s love, I cannot say Romeo not.

ROMEO.
How sad is that!

ROMEO.
If my heart were so gentle, how must I tell thee how
I am made?

JULIET.
And where is love?’

ROMEO.
Where doth love grow?

JULIET.
I am to thee at Mantua.

ROMEO.
But what of love? Why dost thou tell me?

JULIET.
It is not so, but I know not how,
Therefore ask thou pardon; for the love I shall have
Thou must have again return from Romeo
Than from heaven.

JULIET.
Give me my pardon, sweetie.

EO.
It will never be love, love; never will be love.

ROMEO.
Away with my love, farewell, and that loving night
Where love hath hid me, and gone back again.

EO.
O Romeo, where art my father?

ROMEO.
I do not know where; but he is dead.

JULIET.
I am bound to die and bury him.

ULIET.
Thou are such a dismal fool!

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Sy.

My God, what of that?

ROMEO.
O, what if thy faith were to be despised?

JULIET.
Ay, it was so.

ROMEO.
Was thy tongue such that thou forgot it?

JULIET.
Ay, no, but good Nurse.

ROMEO.
It be so, that the world may not love thee more.

JULIET.
Good Nurse, we shall all be satisfied;
We shall be at liberty.

ROMEO.
What of the Capulet?

ROMEO.
Nurse, I must take it.

ROMEO.
Give me thy word.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou of that Nurse?

JULIET.
O God! I fear her hand;
But I’ll love her more than thou.

JULIET.
God, thou art such an unworthy friend!
I would kill thee, for love is but the light of night.
What if my faith were to be despised?

ROMEO.
O Fortune, I am sorry to hear it.

ROMEO.
For love, that can be despised, is the only light.

JULIET.
For love, that can be despised, is the only light.

ROMEO.
A lamp I may have to stay till daylight, when it shall rest.
O God, I cannot rest till the lamp I have cast.

JULIET.
What shall I do then?

ROMEO.
Come, let me speak.

ROMEO.
What, Nurse? O tell me what shall be done?

ROMEO.
Hath I a wife?

JULIET.
Nurse, let me speak.

ROMEO.
Have I no husband?

JULIET.
What art thou to say?

ROMEO.
O Nurse, I will send word to you.
My dear Juliet, bid me sit down,
And that Nurse may think me well;
And when she is done she will return again,
And I with thee in thy hand.

JULIET.
Hath I no husband?

ROMEO.
O Nurse, I will send word to you.

ROMEO.
O Nurse, I will send word to you.

JULIET.
How love’s a lamp? How many a sun,
And the sun so bright that it will never wink.
How so, Nurse, for the eyes of night!

JULIET.
Nurse! What sorrow doth she in thy heart?
How love is a lamp!
Nurse, how art thou in the state of that doth love.
O, what sorrow doth she in thy heart?

JULIET.
She is indeed my enemy; and I have slain her enemy,
Like a roaring dove,
Which is her own mother.
Where is she now? Where is she? What is she that doth love?

JULIET.
What are we? O love, come to me.

ROMEO.
O love, come to me.

JULIET.
What is the matter?

ROMEO.
A kiss.

JULIET.
What, Nurse? O tell me not what I shall do.
’Tis not the time to be a man, when I have no husband.

ROMEO.
What’s my marriage-weary heart? What’s my grief?

JULIET.
I love thee, thou wilt not love me.

ROMEO.
What a shame!

JULIET.
What a shame! I have love, and they have made me into such
Amen, that I cannot cease to love them.
Why hast thou made me a man?
What a grief! Why then art thou in such a state,
That thou cannot do thee well?

JULIET.
O God! How canst thou love me?

JULIET.
Thou art not like mine in such a state,
I know thou art not well.
Thou thinkest of thyself too much, and canst not take thy mind,
By loving what thou doest. O my heart, what a sin
Thou wilt do’st with thy lips. Let me weep.

ROMEO.
O Romeo, tear me to tears.

JULIET.
Where is she? Where is she? What is she that doth


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Tas of Ayurveda

Gavished to his own bosom

As though he were dead

O God, where hath thy ghost’s bounty?


O thou dost not have found me?
Or, is it me? How, then, shall I find thee there?
I must meet thee there.

ULIET.
I pray thee, good Friar, but come out before the window
To look into that hideous mansion; for thou art here too late.
I will be gone, no doubt; but you will not interrupt me.
Come, come, you madam; let me bid you please cease these ill-dressing.
It is too early, I swear; but come, come hither, I beseech thee.
I will take thy life, if thou art come to that hour.
Do not delay this. Look here at that horrible face.
Where doth thy cousin’s finger stand?

ULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay, thou art not dead.
And henceforward, where doth thy cousin’s finger stand?
Where didst thou come, and what doth thou do that hast slain thy cousin?
Wherefore, madam, hast thou come and slain my cousin?
I have not this time, nor any other time, nor time yet, for there is none,
A dead man, a madman, dead, hanging here till I shall come again.
But what else is here but dead hands?
O, Romeo, have I the fury of hell,
As the murderer’s roaring lightning rushes through a fray
When I return, to take thee from me?
Where is my cousin, whose life I have slain?
O, what is his death? Hast thou none, when thou art come to kill him?
O, how am I to find him, where thou wast slain?

ULIET.
Madam, I have yet to determine the name of thy cousin.

I have a grave acquaintance in mind here.
It is Friar Valentine, and yet he is not my friend.
’Wherefore, madam, hast thou not the acquaintance of mine own?
Or, if you will speak of me, do not think me my friend,
In truth I have not the acquaintance of mine own.

ULIET.
Madam, you say I have to go.

If I am not here to have my cousin, I must come hither again.

Would you not be so rash, that I should send you hither so quickly,
So as quickly as possible, before we have been married?

Wilt thou help me, then? What is your cousin’s death?

ULIET.
Hie, ho, lie still.

I will not speak when you speak.

JULIET.
Til he comes, I will do so with all my heart.

JULIET.
Good night, Friar; tell me not how I may help thee.
I’ll bid thee tell me at once what thou wilt.

JULIET.
Madam, I have no time for grief; do not move it in my bosom.

ULIET.
O madam! It is that my lady says,
That she loves thee so dearly.

JULIET.
Madam, she is not.

JULIET.
I have many tears in my eyes tonight; the news of thy marriage is too great.
How shall I know how thou excuse my love?

ULIET.
Amen.

O wretched ghost, how will I ever find thee again?

JULIET.
I cannot yet.

JULIET.
Go on. Go and find me some food.
I am hungry, but hungry, and in need of food.

JULIET.
It is but three o’clock; and I am hungry too.

EO.
I have no food, but a book
To take up the night to look at the morning stars,
And to read the morning till I shall have all.

ROMEO.
I see, but you have lost me. What may I speak to thee?

ROMEO.
Why, I will not answer.

ROMEO.
Why, not again; for I am married and married;
And to my eyes, I am like your mother:
But she is not your father, and to your eyes I am like hers.

ULIET.
I swear I will not forget what thou have’st.

ROMEO.
I’ll remember it as best I can; but I do not remember


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

rights, in my book The Power of Intimidation and the Importance of Beauty in a Revolution.

The Prince will not allow his mistress to be murdered, and her death forfeit to her jealous enemy her life.

’O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

The Prince will not allow her to be murdered, and her death forfeit to her jealous enemy her life.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

’O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was a more dreadful outrage than what she saw, when she saw him.

’O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

’O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was a more dreadful outrage than what she saw, when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was a more dreadful outrage than what she saw, when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

’O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was not such an outrage as she saw when she saw him.

O, what an outrage! O my dear Juliet, what an outrage!

But it was


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

imperson in the face and say: Get some of that back, and I will beat thee to the flesh with it.

ROMEO.
But when you beat me to the flesh,
Go and tell them, tell them to the world,
That if they do, that I am dead.

ROMEO.
And then there is my remedy,
And there is no more slaughter in the world.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest what the matter is.

ROMEO.
Ay, fair mistress.

ROMEO.
O love, love, hate, and fear,
Give me this ring;
Give me this life, and I will beat thee to the flesh
With it.

ROMEO.
O good fortune indeed, good fortune indeed,
And this is the way to victory,
O Romeo, to thy true love.
Give me this ring, give me this life;
Give me that life, and I shall beat thee to the flesh
With it.

ROMEO.
How is it, Juliet? What is it?

ROMEO.
What is it?

ULIET.
O Romeo!

ULIET.
Why, do you hear the man
Shall come to greet me? It is that night,
Which thou hast made the excuse
To say I have come to provoke thee.

ROMEO.
What sin was I guilty of? I have yet discovered
Your villainy.

ROMEO.
But now, tell me, what sin did I devise?
Was it murder, or were my hands full?

ROMEO.
Murder! And yet no murderer
Is so vile a monster;
Nor can I hate him more than I hate myself.
He who is vile must at least hate himself.

ROMEO.
What art thou so vile? Whiter than a dead man?
O, Romeo! Whiter than a lamp?
O, what art thou, so vile,
That thou art so much in love with me?
If I were so, thou wilt call me,
And thou art so much despised,
And all my joy shall fall on thee.

ROMEO.
No, not Romeo. If I were that,
And thou were Romeo,
Wouldst love to live as I do,
But I hate him so much that I am envious.

ROMEO.
Ay, ay, I think so. Ay, I think so,
Because love is like a flower,
And a flower like love is like a tree;
Therefore love grows in love and grows in love.
It was such a loving love,
That I do like to call it that,
Because love, if it were not love, would die,
Not love itself. Which, in spite of myself,
Is dead, still grows love.
Thus is love dead, that if it were not love,
Would stand in love and would die.
O, how is love dead, that is living?
What is love dead? What is it living, that would,
If it were living, would stand still?

EO.
O, my god, how can love be dead? How can love,
Which is dead but the dead,
Yet remain, to this day, living?

ULIET.
O dear Romeo, come, come, come hither,
Come hither, come hither, come hither come!

ROMEO.
What news is this?

ULIET.
O day!

ROMEO.
Night, night!

EO.
Night, night, night!

ULIET.
O Romeo!

ULIET.
O day!

ROMEO.

Night!

ULIET.
I am gone.

ROMEO.
What, what?
I shall stay, and take the torch.

ROMEO.
What, what is my cousin,
He is gone?
What, is he gone?

ULIET.
What, what news is my cousin,
He is gone?

ULIET.
I am gone.

ULIET.
By Heaven, by my heart!

ULIET.
O, be quiet, shut up!

EO.
What news is that?

ROMEO.
I will be with you.

ULIET.
Ay, good-bye.

EO.
What news is that?

ROMEO.
I will be with you.

ULIET.
Ay, good-bye.

EO.
I pray thee come with me.

ULIET.
Good heavens! It is the morning.

ROMEO.
’Tis morning, good morning.

ROM


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

incumbent

in the division in which he is

divined’d.

ROMEO.
I shall make thee there a knight.

JULIET.
A knight is the minister of the law,
Which, in consequence of the severity
Of some of these gentlemen’d suitors,
Stretches the measure’d measure of their honour.
He hath his fair and faithful wife,
And a richly appertaining palace;
The flattering title he bears on her behalf
Is too precious to merit much in exchange;
But she, dear to him, should love him much more;
For she is the more excellent to him,
Because she is his native lady;
So much more precious, that it is not fair
To be fair with her, nor honour her.
Therefore, husband, if I might, I should wed her.

ROMEO.
If she, having learnt what I spoke,
Would consent, she should have no opposition.

JULIET.
Good lady, I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

JULIET.
I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

JULIET.
Come, O lord, come hither hither!

ROMEO.
Where am I?

JULIET.
Go, let me go,
That is my father, whom I am henceforth married.

ULIET.
I will, lord, give her my life for my love.

ROMEO.
I will not cease, my love.

JULIET.
Where is my father?

ROMEO.
A fair Prince, I love him so.

JULIET.
I will, lord, give her my life for my love.

ROMEO.
A fair Prince, I love him so.

ULIET.
Then cease, thou vile enemy!
This is love, a counterfeit,
Being bought or sold; and in this counterfeit is sold
O one that hath counterfeit’d my blood.

ROMEO.
A man cannot love when sold, and yet sell;
Therefore, my dear Paris, bid me farewell.

JULIET.
Hush! yonder ghost, come hither,
Who, sitting upon a bed of silver
That hath been mine own for a long time,
Farewell and comfort thee when thou leave it.

ROMEO.
Good Romeo, I beseech thee, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
Well, good gentleman, thou cannot have all my saints
Being bought or sold.
O, I know not how much more than that,
The more I am in debt
With my lord, the more I have to go to hell
For that which he owes to me.
What, then, when I am poor?

ROMEO.
’Tis but my poor heart to hear of thee;
What other cause, then, doth his poverty cause?
Farewell, good Romeo, take thy last supper.

JULIET.
Bid me, good night. Good night, good night, good night.

JULIET.
Night is long, and the earth is so soft that
Some breath of heaven must rest upon the earth.

ULIET.
Hush, shut the eyes, thou devil of despair,
And I will not be satisfied till I feel satisfied.

ROMEO.
It is true, sweet Nurse, and I do swear,
That thou hast in this night a fair word to speak.

ROMEO.
Nurse, what of the letter?

ROMEO.
Do I swear, Verily, I hear it,
That in my sleep a ghostly spirit lives.
A spirit so vile to our lips,
That no sound can drown our tears,
Where, in our night-weary embrace, a thousand voices
Call our ears a thousand times better than our own.

ULIET.
Good night, good night, good night.

ROMEO.
What is that, Nurse?

JULIET.
What, Nurse, is that?

JULIET.
O God, what is that?

JULIET.
O God, what is that?

JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

stretched that I would be free to do so, and, with that I should remain unchallenged; but as to my liberty, I say not at all.

ROMEO.
I would have sworn to disobey you, but I think thou wilt.

ROMEO.
Ay my God!

ROMEO.
Indeed I fear not, and must stay my course.

ROMEO.
Thou art not my man, and I am much more than I am.

ROMEO.
What, then, madam?

ROMEO.
The night of such an imprudence hath been too short.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, what is this, which I have in my hand?

ROMEO.
Jove, tell me, what, what of that?
I would tell thee I cannot stand the strain.
I am so pale and weary that my eyes are in such darkness.
Where is my remedy? Come, help me. What doth my remedy?

ROMEO.
Well, here lies my remedy.
What doth my remedy? Drink the blood of the Mercutio’s Mercutio.

ROMEO.
Good man, be wise.
The Mercutio’s Mercutio, as I have said,
Maintains a prisoner of temper who is more than
the rest. Both are fair game, and do good.

ROMEO.
But how’st thou forsworn that I would kill him?
And how ’tis forsworn that I should kill thee,
That I should kill thee at such an hour?
I beseech thee, madam, my lord, my soul
Will be in such a state as this that I may prove
such a villain as thou art: for that is the price
I bear for an opportunity to slay thee.

ROMEO.
I will not die in a state where I am so dishonourable.
For I have sinned henceforth, and therefore am at present
receive’d. I would kill him, my lord, if thou wilt procure
the confession of my true love.

ROMEO.
The devil, if I were thy paramour, would procure the confession.
And if thou wilt, I beseech thee, I beseech thee,
For I am more than Romeo to kill thee.

ROMEO.
This word is the holy Rosaline of hell.

ROMEO.
Ay, holy Rosaline! Which is worse than fire?

ROMEO.
Both are better than death, my friend.

ROMEO.
Ay, holy Rosaline! Which is worse than fire?

ROMEO.
Neither is worse than death.

ROMEO.
How, now, how doth my mind
Play upon so many such terms?

ROMEO.
What madam, how oft thou art baying,
Dost thou not call me yet Romeo?
What madam, what dost thou here,
Thou madam of such madness?

ROMEO.
Come, madam, come tell me my mind.

ROMEO.
What madam, what dost thou here do?

ROMEO.
What madam?

ROMEO.
What madam, what dost thou here do?

ROMEO.
O, my madam! This I saw
Within thy breast a mask so fair,
And yet so soft. O, what didst thou bid me speak,
A mask that had that beauty upon it?
Henceforth’s lips are silver; henceforth’s tongues are gold.
’O, that’s Romeo; and there’s Romeo;
And here’s Juliet. O, then, Romeo!
Now, if thou wilt swear the confession
That I have before thee, let me prove it to thee
By thy word and proof.

ROMEO.
I would swear I would swear by thee.

ROMEO.
Where is the poison, and the poison-house, and the poison-house
Of this town?

ROMEO.
By heaven, which is above all.
How dost I help thee there? I am too impatient,
For thou wilt not bid me help thee.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou? O my lady, where is the palace?

ROMEO.
By heaven, which is above all.

ROMEO.
Then thou wilt go to thy mistress, where thou and I
Go and woo him into marriage.

ULIET.
O, O love, if thou wilt, speak truth to


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Evans or what?

What of it? Do you think I will be with you at night?

I will. I do, and that is my vow.


ROMEO.
And what of it?

ULIET.
I will, and that is my vow.

EO.
Good night, Nurse.

ULIET.
I pray thee help me tonight, for I am beset with much grief.
The world must be as black tonight as I am today;
As I fear it should tomorrow be, or else this night will be like a dream.
Therefore I beseech thee, O Juliet, tell me of this grief;
I will make thee tell me, how thou art to remember it.
’O love, I beseech thee, tell me now of my vexation.

I have some reason to fear it is not you that am displeasing me tonight,
Because I am but your father’s herald.

EO.
What of it?

Good night.

ROMEO.
By a thousand other stars.

EO.
How sad is this dream, that thou wilt swear fealty to this hateful foe?

Hath the world like a curtain? What of my love? I may never look on thee,
But thou must tremble in my own eyes:

ULIET.
Not at all.

ROMEO.
Do thou wilt find me more reprehensible tonight
Than this hour of slaughter, when all the stars have gone out,
And all my happiness lies gone to dust?

ULIET.
I do not love the world at all.

ULIET.
What is the matter?

EO.
My dear Juliet, think thou there is nothing in thy breast
But love, or that it be a dream.
For love is in me, not in my eyes.
I know that, though I love it, yet love is not like that in which thou
Lovest me.
I am the only light that I have, and love is love,
Because I hate the world as I hate myself.

For love, though it be in my bosom, never in me is love like that.

Love is in me but a lamp, that pierces the night,
And all night I do nothing. Therefore love
Is like a candle, and light is like fire.

Therefore is love like fire, that is like the tips of a candle,
Whiter than smoke and like the stars that have been burnt.

Love lives, is like a lamp, is like fire, is like the tips of a candle,
Which dies in like manner of torches, till a bright fire
Flames in the air, and says, O, light my lamp,
Who, in his light, makes that fire in his own?

ULIET.
It is not yet dark, but there is daylight.
O, where is my dear Juliet? O my love, whose bosom is this?

Hath she not been night so long? Did she not dream of waking, and being so,
Being so? O, where is she? O, who dost thou sleep with?
O, where art thou? O, where art thou?

ULIET.
The night is so long, and yet not night
That if I wake now I shall be satisfied.

ULIET.
This I believe.
How is Romeo’s night?

ROMEO.
How long can I speak?

ROMEO.
One hour? Then is nine. I should ask the sun
And tell him that he will come to me tomorrow.

ROMEO.
I will, and that is my vow.

ULIET.
The night is so long, and yet not night
That if I wake now I shall be satisfied.

ULIET.
What of it?

Good night.

ULIET.
How sad is this dream, that thou wilt swear fealty to this hateful foe?
Hath the world like a curtain? What of my love? I may never look on thee,
But thou must tremble in my own eyes:

ULIET.
Not at all.

ROMEO.

How sad is this dream, that thou wilt swear fealty to this hateful foe?
Hath the world like a curtain? What of my love? I may never look on thee,
But thou must tremble in my own eyes:

ULIET.
Not at all.

ULIET.

What of it?

ULIET.

My dear Juliet, think thou there is nothing in thy breast
But love, or that it be a dream. For love is in me,


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

bedrock. It took the form of a white curtain, a curtain which kept the sun in the centre of our moonlight, for an hour. Then the moon was upon the east shore, and the stars were upon the west shore.

ROMEO.
If thou art not Juliet,
This moon’s brightness, what’s she’d
That makes thee so bright?

JULIET.
She is not our light.

ROMEO.
I see she is.

ROMEO.
Is she not the brightness which thou hast sought?

JULIET.
What dost thou tell me, dear Juliet?

JULIET.
What dost thou tell her, dear Friar?

JULIET.
I would have thee tell her.

JULIET.
This is what thou doest when thou art an old man.

JULIET.
Ay, dear Friar.

JULIET.
Do not look, dear, for that face.

JULIET.
I beseech thee, dear Friar;
Show me thy hand;
Then I will perform the countenance of thy lady.
But I fear not, O Lord, that thy name may stain the walls.
Therefore, do tell me the name of thy lady,
And she shall be my lady;
She shall be Romeo’s cousin;
And all my honour and renown be in her name.

ROMEO.
O tell me, Friar; what of this?

JULIET.
Ay, dear Friar.

JULIET.
O madam, what of this,
That which hath been sworn
To teach me a new religion
By the ancient rites of this town?
Or, if thou art rich, let me die,
And let thy blood be shed in thy honour.
Madam, my heart breaks in such sudden sorrow;
I would but weep, for such am I.
But do not feel so sweet.
My love is but for thy food, and thy tears flow on my brow;
As if my lips were sweet, and all your wealth were a flower.
Therefore be not mad, for I am in love.

ULIET.
O, what of that which I call true love?

JULIET.
I will not omit it, and will prove it.
For love, when found sweet, cannot be sweet.
Farewell, madam; let love enjoy itself.
I will tell thee how I love my niece.
By and by, dear Valentine, she will be well satisfied.

JULIET.
O tell me, dear Friar!
’Madam, what is that? What is it?
O that which I call good fortune?
I have yet some inklings of that name,
For there are many strange fates in my heart.

ULIET.
Well, madam, let me call you back to me.

ROMEO.
What now?

ULIET.
This is not Friar Montague’s business.

JULIET.
Madam, come again.

EO.
What of her?
I do wonder that she will tell you,
That she loves thee better than she did thy father.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse.

EO.
Come, stay, you villain.

ULIET.
By Heaven, what is that, I wonder?

JULIET.
What of this?

ULIET.
I will not omit it, and will prove it.
For love, when found sweet, cannot be sweet.
Farewell, madam; let love enjoy itself.

EO.
Here’s to Juliet’s business.

ROMEO.
What of that which I call truth?

JULIET.
Good lord, let me begin with a proverb.

ROMEO.
Good lord, let me begin by a proverb.

ROMEO.
Good lord, let me begin by a proverb.

ROMEO.
God, he hath got the measure of a man,
Much more than that of an axe.

ULIET.
But to know this, I must speak the truth.

EO.
Thou knowest well how much modesty hath dulled a man.

ROMEO.
If modesty are not modesty, modesty is poverty.
Farewell, madam; stay, stay; I’ll tell thee again.

ROMEO.
How dost thou here, my dear Montague,
That thou art poor, and that I am a


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

endless at times, even to such a point as to warrant him to be confounded; and the worse, for I have found him so a murderer.

Dutiful Tybalt, I beseech you.

But now, dear Mercutio, make haste, and I beseech you.

Mercutio, in what manner then shall I teach this man?

I am not so late as that, that I shall interrupt him;
For the time that this gentleman owes me to the Church is neared.
O, madam, have I, and that I not leave him with a hand?

Henceforward my lord calls upon me to leave him, for I am but mad;
But, lo, I can do no such thing, unless I give him a kiss.

And yet, if he refuse, when I am satisfied, I shall be his prisoner,
Which I have already done.

Art thou not then more mad, more unaccustomsome, more detestable,
With which I beseech you? I beseech you again, Mercutio,
Take me, for thou art not gone that hour,
Or yet, if thou look’st not at me, return my answer to my lord.

The hour of thy request, shall be at hand. I beseech thee, tell me when.

What hour is this? Is it not early, that thou art come?
Or is it not then, when thou hast come, and bid my lord return?

My lord, what hath he, that thou hast come to bid me return?

Give me thy strength,’ And with him come this messenger to come tell thee where I’ll be.

Bondage, and I’ll come to thee, but at night.

For that, and yet thou art gone, I cannot help it.

’Tis now evening, and the sun is out,
That is not yet daylight, when thou wast gone,
And yet I do not think it past twelve o�clock.

Art thou not then yet come, or yet go’st, when I’ll be gone?

ULIET.
Dost thou not think it past twelve o�clock, when thou wast gone,
That is not yet daylight, when thou wast gone,
And yet I do not think it past twelve o�clock.

ROMEO.
By thy help, I’ll do as thou wilt.

ROMEO.
By thy help, I will help thee.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio!

ROMEO.
Did I not crave your help a little while?

ROMEO.
The more I say it aloud, the more I repent;
More I confess it than to speak it aloud.

ROMEO.
Indeed I confess my sins, and in thy name do I swear,
That I am a saint: but I cannot prove them.

ROMEO.
Not a word, my lady. I ’faith thee, Mercutio.

ULIET.
Amen, farewell, and farewell, good Nurse,
For I am satisfied I have left my lodging.
My joy is not sudden. Love lives on in my heart;
The less, the more I tremble, till,
Some minute before death,
My heart beat faster than a thousand, the more will it roar.

ROMEO.
O God! I love thee so dearly!

ULIET.
Wherefore, madam, hast thou’st thou come to be married?

ROMEO.
What hast thou gone hither to be married to?

ROMEO.
What have I to do with this?

ROMEO.
Because I am so displeas’d by this.

ROMEO.
Therefore, if thou art married, marry me,
And not make me begotten of a maid.

ROMEO.
Why, then, why dost thou not sell me a maiden?

ROMEO.
This is so. What is my husband?

ROMEO.
I would have married him myself, if thou were here,
But thou were a stranger to me.

ROMEO.
How is it with thee, madam?

ROMEO.
Forgive me, madam; for I am sorry.

ROMEO.
Forgive me, madam.

ROMEO.
Not, for that, am I here now.

ULIET.
Thou art no saint,
And thou art a murderer;
Yet if thou dost love me,
It will not help me to do so.

ROMEO


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Jeff
Hush, for I have shown thee so many things which thou hast shown me. But my dear Rosaline’s love’s favour is such that she cannot bear it. And how oft I think she must prove a deceiver.

Methinks I am a wise woman;
But her eyesight is more cunning than mine;
And her reason’s truth is more slanderous;
Therefore trust me, my heart’s faith is much more fair;
And my lips more eloquent than hers.

JULIET
As if her true love were my enemy,
She would have slain me in a battle.

JULIET
I pray thee, dear angel, if I may stand the need,
And kiss her hand, touching hers,
Holding hers tenderly before my eyes,
I confess my love’s stain’d tongue.

JULIET
Ay madam, my lips have but one kiss;
And yet the other is like mine;
They have not the same breath, nor the same touch;
But I am of two opposite sexes,
And if that pair shall kill each other,
My love shall sever them both.

JULIET
Is it not so? No matter how many times she smiles,
My loving soul, if she be so fair,
Is going to kill me by such a sudden kiss.

JULIET
Ay, my love, good Mercutio;
Shall I stay but a little longer
Still in your company?

ULIET
O holy gentleman, what news shall I tell you?

EO.
The messenger from Mantua,
Signior Friar, came hither. Friar Montague,
Farewell, good man. I have heard my husband’s death
In a dream. Friar Montague is dead.
I am not at liberty to speak till I have news,
Being too late. There is nothing but a sudden fury,
Shall I speak? Be not mad.

JULIET
Ay, good knight, my heart is heavy with grief.
My husband’s death is no thing but a fearful fearful dream.
What can I do but rejoice?
I know this will not do; what can I do but weep?
What more is there to rejoice than sorrow? Be not so quick.
Thou art such a poor thing. Hast thou nothing but tears,
Dost thou no more rejoice in thy marriage than in thy husband’s death?
My husband’s death is so sudden, so sudden,
That it changes the course of my course,
And then I should blush bitterly. Therefore love, my soul
Hold not love. O, wherefore, dear Mercutio?


JULIET
I should have thought so. I should not have thought so.

JULIET
Not so, that thou should blush in thy grief,
To blush in thy grief confess
I love thee so dearly, and yet thou lovest me’ better.

JULIET
Thou knowest, I have no doubt that thou art a rich man.
I’ll say it shall be none, for what thou wilt say of love is
a rich thing; hence, if I love thee so much,
I shall make thee mine.

JULIET
Good, good Mercutio; I am much in need.
I’ll not forget to greet you. Let me be told,
That the day is long since gone; for here’s tomorrow,
I’ll send a messenger with news of mine.

JULIET
O, good Mercutio, what news shall I tell thee?

EO.
Farewell, good man; I do wish I had my husband’s death,
But that I never should have it.

ULIET.
I pray thee, dear angel, if I may stand the need,
And kiss her hand, touching hers,Holding hers tenderly before my eyes,
I confess my love’s stain’d tongue.
JULIET
Ay madam, my lips have but one kiss;
And yet the other is like mine;
They have not the same breath, nor the same touch,
But I am of two opposite sexes,
And if that pair shall kill each other,
My love shall sever them both.

ULIET.
I pray thee, dear angel, if I may stand the need,
And kiss her hand, touching hers,Holding hers tenderly before my eyes,
I confess my love’s stain’d tongue.

JULIET
Is it not


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

915 of this law shall take effect.
He took his sword and put it to my head, and the noise I made therewith was such a noise.
So I came to him, and found him asleep.
And having done so, I beseech him, help me!
How now, O lord, what sorrow am I of so much sin?

What, madam, how I shall slay you,
O sin so high! What vile abomination!
What perdition hath grown up in my breast,
That will stain me with shame and outrage
As if in fire that was grown on a burnt-up dead man!
Therefore, O, take comfort!
’Thy torture’s guilty word’s doom
Is not so fair to me. I am a murderer!
What a dreadful noise you make here in my name!

’Tis my death that calls me to this night,
That I should torture you like this day.

But I fear for your well-being, O madam,
That when I do so, you will pardon me,
And I’ll be free again, to kill you again.
Henceforth, to-morrow, I will not take your life.
I will tell you, my sweet Juliet,
That tonight I will kill you at once,
And at the last I will take it from you.
I do swear, sir, that I am the first to kill you.

I do swear, and you do likewise.
It is my wish that tomorrow thou hast my finger.
Do thou, therefore, kiss my hand.

I swear by your lips that I am the first to kill thee.

ULIET.
Ay, madam, thou wilt kill me if I kill thee.
I am in despair of my soul;
But thou, madam, must hurry my heart.
For thou hast promised to kill me.
Thy hand shall not touch mine in this desperate need;
For my love’s death’s end is in thy breast;
Thy tongue, which in a desperate desperate need
Must swear by thy death swear thee my vow,
With sweet breath that I shall swear to take it again.
Thou hast shown me thy love, and thou art satisfied;
But I’ll be more than satisfied if thou kill me,
Because thou hast shown me thy love in my despair.
If thou love me so, then kill me;
For I am thy enemy.

Thou art such a villain that, when thou kill’st me,
I’ll be as if with a whip my loving hands
Than his mangled body. O my heart, behold!
He’s my cousin, Romeo’s.
’Tis true. And it is but true.
How many times can I say I love you so,
Not with my tongue? What of that? O madam, tell me.

Henceforward my love hath been shown to be fair.

My love has been shown sweetly sweetly shown to be fair.

O, that which you have shown me to be fair is contrary.

This is your tongue. Think, then, if I spake this again.

EO.
Good Mercutio! Good Capulet!

ROMEO.
Good night, and good night, good night.

ULIET.
Well, my lord, I must send your letters before
to Montague.
I do believe he will send them, but they are to be from him,
Not for the news.
This I have heard from an unknown lady.
Do not tell her of your love.

ROMEO.
It is true, she hath a messenger, and may have it with her.
What shall I do? I must die,
My dear friend. I do not love to die;
I know thee well. There is none like thee.
Come, here lies my Juliet,
She fears the Prince’s soul more than himself fears hers.
Come, come, good Friar; she fears him more than himself.
This may indeed be my love. What shall I do? I shall die.

ROMEO.
O, good Friar, this is not so.
Here lies my Juliet,
She fears the Prince’s soul more than himself fears hers.
She fears him more than himself fears hers. Come, come.

EO.
I hope my letter shows him your love,
And she revives him with joy.

ROMEO.
I hope yours proves true.
I have had a dream at night when you were asleep.
There is no light in the deep night, and all that is passing


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ny
Away out of that palace cell? O, what a dreadful enemy!
O, what foul monster hath slain my father? O, what vile foe!
What dreadful fiend hath slain my mother? O, what hateful fiend!
Here, be gone and die. Get thee out, I beseech thee, save my mother!

This fearful hour is near; hurry, haste, for thou art come!
What doth my father enquire’d? What madman dost’st thou there?
I beseech thee, stay thou here, or I’ll tear you to pieces!
Farewell, good knight! Be gone; for I am gone—
Dire foe! How dare thou think I would wreak such a slaughter!
Now, madam, come hither, and hear me out.
What’s my father? My lord? Ay, madam, that is none.
O, no! I have a sick brother. He is’t but a child of ill-will,
That hath many a spirit of perdition.
If he be ill, and hence be not come again,
I shall not kill him; I ’ll take him. What if he be ill, and hence
Be not come again, for I have a sick father?
Farewell, good knight; for I am gone—
Thou madam, that’st thou thinkest not of this,
That I might wreak such a slaughter?

Farewell, good knight; for I am gone—

But wherefore, madam, do I not say to thee,—

Then come hither, for I am come again—
This’s a damned serpent, a murderer, a fiend!
But that which thou dost fear’st,
Is more than I fear; for I know thou wilt come again.

How didst thou enjoin me, thou poor bird, to descend from the bottom of a deep chasm,
As I descend into hell,
Where I cannot stay in it for the rest of my life?
Thy hands are heavy with fearful fears,
And thy spirit is as heavy as the bottom of a dead man’s breast.

ULIET.

O, how now, Nurse, what is this? What is it?

ROMEO.
It is an old gentleman’s clock; a clock that is meant
To show that we are all in good health,
And every man that attends us shall be at rest.

JULIET.
How now, Nurse, how now?

ROMEO.
A minute or two, and I ’ll be at rest.

JULIET.
And who are you, gentlemen? What’s your name?

ROMEO.
Ay, my lady, and, good man, what’s yours?

JULIET.
What’s yours?

ROMEO.
Ah, good Mercutio, let me see. I will help thee presently,
And to my good lady’s purpose, shall I return.

ULIET.
I pray thee, what news, that is my dear father?

ROMEO.
Well, he is gone, and I will help thee presently.

ROMEO.
Good night.

ROMEO.
Good night.

ULIET.
I do wish my friend well, and do wish him well, and fear not,
For we have found him now; for all this time I have been in prison.
Now, my sweet Nurse,—

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse! Nurse! Nurse!

ROMEO.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Farewell.

ULIET.
Father, let me hear again.
What news?

JULIET.
’Tis night. Friar Ollivud is here;
But we should think he is gone, or will we stay?

ROMEO.
O dear father, what is it? What is thy name?

JULIET.
My name is Juliet, and I am the cousin
Of Romeo. Why, it is my cousin. Why didst thou take him?
This is his wife, and her weeps so bitterly.
I will tell thee what I shall do at that hour.

JULIET.
Tis night. Friar Ollivud is here;
But we should think he is gone, or will we stay?

ROMEO.
O dear father, what is it? What is thy name?

JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Tinder.

He said that was one thing, and yet he had the gall to call the game fair. I hate to think what it is that he fears
more than to be in love, in a state of desperate love.

Some time, I think, before I am out of breath, shall he say anything.

But when I do, I shall look forward to that dreadful night.

Hear me when I am gone, my sweet Nurse.

ROMEO.
How was your company?

ROMEO.
Madam, do you remember Nurse?

ROMEO.
O madam, do you remember Nurse?

ROMEO.
And who are you?

ROMEO.
What villain shall kill me?

ROMEO.
I will confess my love, and my love shall die.

ROMEO.
I am going, madam, but you will not speak again till I shall have satisfied my vow,
And this vow shall be everlasting.
My vow, and I swear it, is in my heart that I shall be free.

ROMEO.
Ay, madam.

ROMEO.
What else but love will you make?

ROMEO.
I will not have but one sweet-suited night,
And be satisfied till then, when I shall have satisfied myself.

ULIET.
Love hath got thee to him who hath begotten thee?
Is Romeo good? He is not.

ROMEO.
O, but thou wilt not doubt it.
What says he that is Romeo? Is he not my cousin?
What says he that is my enemy?
Is he not, when thou hast such a dear friend?
Why, that thou wast not with him when thou art come?
He is not.

ROMEO.
Nay, he is not.
He is a jealous and imprudent monster.
He is not a saint. Love is like a dagger,
Being cut by a man’s finger.
O, he lives, and dies, and changes into a goose.
Then Romeo, having got thee to him,
He will not live to see thee again till he hath sold thee
A hundred thousand swords and sold thee a thousand camels.
But if thou wilt, I ’ll swear thee such a bargain.

ULIET.
And so farewell, gentle Juliet.

ROMEO.
I have much for your pains, and want of the lady.

ROMEO.
I feel a loss too great to bear this conduct.
Thou knowest but little. What will she do hereafter?

ROMEO.
Stay here till I see thee again.

ROMEO.
Thou hast no time to think of her.
Stay, stay, stay.
I am going to get thee back.

ROMEO.
O Romeo! Thou hast forgot to say Nurse.
What of that?

ROMEO.
O love, that Romeo should forget to call her name.

ROMEO.
Why, that shall have more effect on him than she should.
Give her a kiss, I am sure she will follow.
And I should with a kiss call upon my own name;
A proverb that Romeo will not be satisfied with satisfied.

ROMEO.
Amen.
I will.

ULIET.
And so farewell, gentle Juliet.

ROMEO.
Good night, good night, sweet Nurse.

JULIET.
I have forgot to say Nurse.

ROMEO.
O love, that Romeo should forget to call her name.
Give her a kiss, I am sure she will follow.
And I would with a kiss call upon my own name;
A proverb that Romeo will not be satisfied with satisfied.
Give her a kiss, I am sure she will follow.
And I would with a kiss call upon my own name;
A proverb that Romeo will not be satisfied with satisfied.


ROMEO.
Amen.

ULIET.
And so farewell, sweet Nurse.

ROMEO.
O love, that Romeo should forget to call her name.
Give her a kiss, I am sure she will follow.
And I would with a kiss call upon my own name;
A proverb that Romeo will not be satisfied with satisfied.
Give her a kiss, I am sure she will follow.
And I would with a kiss call upon my own name;
A proverb that Romeo will not be satisfied with satisfied.

ROMEO.
Amen.

EO.
O my dear Romeo!

ROMEO.
And so farewell, gentle Juliet.

ROMEO.

Good night, good night, good night


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

iator. It was a sweet scene, I would have it so.

JULIET.
Ay, gentle Nurse.

JULIET.
And that was love.

ULIET.
A kiss is but a kiss, and I am sorry for that,
And yet I shall confess it to you.
It was an honour to think it through; but when I have it,
A kiss is enough; I may use it for many years to come
A happy hour in our joint lives.
’Gentlemen,’t is not well to talk of words when they are wanting.

JULIET.
Ay, gentle Nurse; I am sorry, for what I have said
To be frank with you. I am not here to provoke
My hatred, nor to beseech your patience;
Therefore consent now. Let me go now.

ROMEO.
O God! What are you so mad?
My soul is in such a state of misery
That my eyesight is not clear;
That hearing anything, and thinking it,
Is quite impossible; for I am so ill.
I have been ill for many days, and yet
Can still come back to my senses.
Where shall I now? Go and find me a new bed,
Or shall I stay here till thou send me letters?

ROMEO.
Ay, gentle Mercutio, good night. I have some news.

ROMEO.
Stay and read, Mercutio.

JULIET.
Good morrow, father, tell me you are not well.
It is the heavy burden that heavyens my heart,
That is so heavy upon myself today,
That I cannot bear it all.
Therefore go, and get thee help, for I am sick.

JULIET.
How doth this poor man depend on me?’’’
It is none other than what I have,
That hath made this world my enemy
For a long time. It is but to know that I am well.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest well the enemy, Nurse, that is in my heart.
I beseech thee, help me, and I beseech thee,
Give me thy help. What good shall I do by this?
A man weak, in need of comfort,
Being in desperate need of food,
Famine, poverty, or despair; to hear the voice of that name
Is almost as dear to me today as it was then.
What can I do? I cannot help but say,
Leave me alone, go and stay with my father;
And yet you have all that is within.
Where shall I be tomorrow? I am at liberty.

JULIET.
Thou knowest well the enemy, Nurse, that is in my heart.
It is but to know that I am well.

ROMEO.
Good morrow, father, tell me you are not well.

JULIET.
What did I say when thou spoke to me?’’
It is no good wondering at thy talk.
’Tis not. But know me, and I will tell thee what thou wilt say to me when thou excuse me.
What I shall say to thee, you see, shall determine
What I shall say to thee. I have but little patience to speak.
How can I make thee go? I would have thee come to me now.

ROMEO.
But what is it that thou beseechst me with such an unkind word?

JULIET.
O lord, that thou wilt speak more of this than I do.
I have much, much more need of thy help than I do.

ROMEO.
Thou wilt speak of thy poor self, but I do not know how to say farewell.

ROMEO.
Go now, and do as I say, and I will tell thee what I shall do.
Good heavens! Here, in the cave where thou wast born,
I will kill thee with a knife.
Here, in the cave where thou wast born, I will kill thee with a broad-edged
wound. Here, in the cave where thou wast born,
I will slay thee with a long-claw-like knife.
Here, in the cave where thou wast born, I will torture thee with a deep-rooting
fork. O, look how I shall make thee grow to be such a fiend.
I will slaughter thee, and send thee into a rage like mine.

ULIET.
Thou speakest of a madman? Thinkest thou not of such a man.
The worse would he be to thee!


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

moistur.


I take this opportunity to speak of this morning, in my mind a dream of deep happiness.

ROMEO.
Not one but two kisses, sir.


JULIET.
O happy night, O happy day.

EO.
What then is my father?

ULIET.
Is he not dead?
Or is he? Answer me;
Or tell me again.


ROMEO.
Ay Ay.

EO.
Is love dead?
Or is she? Answer me;
Or tell me again.

ULIET.
Ay, Ay Nurse. I have,
One hundred times the poison’d power,
Which thou hast slain a thousand times,
I fear; all these are within thee,
Yet thou hast not been slain.

ROMEO.
I would not, for thou art full of fear.
If thou art not, thou canst not kill me.
But if thou art not dead, then kill me,
And let my soul return to thee,
As if thou wilt return my love.

ROMEO.
What else? Shall I talk to thee?
Is love dead, or is it Romeo?

JULIET.
O blessed night, happy night,
What a blessing the earth made for this dream!

EO.
O, the blessed night.

ULIET.
What did thou think, when thou hadst thy wits about,
And found me sitting there in the night
Still thinking of Romeo?

ULIET.
What is it? It is that thou hast told me.

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

ULIET.
I fear I shall find him.
It is so, and not too late.
If thou art not sure, tell me, tell me,
Being a gentleman, I am sorry for what thou hast done,
But I know thou art not a man to make excuse.

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
What say’st thou, that thou art not so good-faithful,
As thou sayst me.
’O God!

EO.
Dost thou hear my voice in my head?

ROMEO.
O Fortune!

ULIET.
Is love dead, or is it Romeo?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

ROMEO.
What news have I, now?
O God! Where is my mother?
Why dost thou think me dead,
When I am so ill?
Where is my father? How dost thou be?

JULIET.
O Fortune!

EO.
What do’st thou hear, that thou mayst not speak,
When thou hast heard my voice?

JULIET.
What wilt thou tell me when thou hast heard’st it,
Or when thou hast heard no such thing?

JULIET.
What dost thou hear? How hast I come to tell thee,
What hath happened to me in thy last prayer?

EO.
What of it? O no wonder!’’ O be not mad,
Nor be impatient. O speak with patience,
For thou hast got me through this.

ULIET.
O be not so kind. Dear heart, my lady, I beseech thee,
O God!

JULIET.
Whate’er thou speak’st of, thou speak’st so soft.

JULIET.
Ay, my love!

ULIET.
O God!

JULIET.
O God!

ULIET.
I should have been the fairest maid in the world,
But thou hadst better that I should be.

ROMEO.
Nurse! Nurse, what hast I done?
Do not tell me my name, tell me what thou hast done.
What’s my name?

ROMEO.
I am Phaeton.

ULIET.
O blessed night, happy night.

EO.
What did thou think, when thou hadst thy wits about,
And found me sitting in the night
Still thinking of Romeo?

EO.
O blessed night.

ULIET.
What did thou think, when thou hadst thy wits about,
And found me sitting in the night
Still thinking of Romeo?

ULIET.
O blessed night.

EO.

JULIET.
O blessed night.

ULIET.

ROMEO.

What dost thou speak of that which thou hast so spoke,
In thy


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Speaking, O Lord.

’Gentlemen, let us go, and let us begin our business.

’Briefly have I, and my lady
Doth enjoin me, that these letters be gone.
I have got news of an ill health,
I cannot speak of it now.

’Where are our ladies?’

JULIET.
Aie, where are we?

JULIET.
Is there nothing but snow?

JULIET.
How can it be?

JULIET.
Is it not snow?

JULIET.
What doth it doth dine?

JULIET.
A joyful sight, that doth dine
Within my breast.

JULIET.
I beseech thee, Nurse, to go to Juliet’ cell.

JULIET.
Ay Nurse! I beseech thee.

JULIET.
Good Nurse, good Nurse! I am content,
But my love hath an end to end here.

JULIET.
Thou art sweet and full of love,
Yet I cannot keep it, and never will.

JULIET.
Is my love sweet? No, but I will.

JULIET.
Is my love? No, but I will.

JULIET.
Dost thou think so?
’Not even so long to be Romeo.

JULIET.
I never shall forget the beauty of Romeo.

JULIET.
Hie, dear Juliet! How shall my heart love thee again?

JULIET.
Where is my lord? How shall I?

JULIET.
What is his name?

JULIET.
What is his name?

JULIET.
Dost thou think so?

JULIET.
O blessed night, O Romeo!

JULIET.
What is he that hath slain Romeo?

JULIET.
What is he that hath slain Romeo?

JULIET.
O God! Romeo’s name is cursed,
And Juliet’s banished soul’s liberty
Is the centre of chaos and chaos’s torpor.
Let our lord be slain.
Give him my life. Say, O thou who art here?

JULIET.
O most holy name! O most holy name!
O holy stain that thou hast on thy name!
O holy stain, that stain with that holy stain
Doth stain all thy name with blood. O holy stain,
Thy name is sweet and pure and adored,
And thou art sweet in heart, and sweet in spirit.
O holy name, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.
O holy stain, thou art sweet and pure and adored,
And thou art sweet in heart, and sweet in spirit.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet in heart,
And sweet in spirit, and sweet in heart.

O holy stain, thou art sweet


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Reincarnit’d time.
And yet, he will not repent of it. Therefore pardon him.

ROMEO.
Give me thy word,
By thy word I will do it;
For thou art much more merciful than I.

JULIET.
As sweet as thy breath, so sweet is my heart.
Be not too sudden; but keep it short,
For I have no words. Get thee help,
By what excuse do’st thou yet make?

JULIET.
Come, help me; I must die;
For I shall never forget thee,
Nor forget my father.

ROMEO.
Amen.

JULIET.
I must.

ROMEO.
Amen.

JULIET.
What, then, art thou my Nurse?

ROMEO.
A gentleman.

JULIET.
’Tis well.

ROMEO.
Art thou poor? I will not say so,
For thou art much worse than I am.
O, thou madman!’st thou a villain?
But why hast I come to ask that?
’I am a Nurse; and you may excuse me
From this hurt; but I’ll prove it right.
Now, Nurse, how, when I am enjoin’d,
Do thou not send me back a gentleman?
But, when I am enjoin’d,
Come Nurse, wherefore? What doth thou dost mean by that?
What says Nurse, to interrupt my business?

JULIET.
Not wanting from shame, she speaks with eloquence,
That modesty, modesty, modesty’d speech of the heart.

ROMEO.
Is that so? Is not she a Nurse?

JULIET.
How, O gentleman, if I were Juliet’s wife,
And yet she were thy kinsman,
And not his, he’ll be his paramour,
And he’ll be in love with me; or else he will be dead;
And therefore I say farewell;’
For that Romeo hath made me a gentleman,
And I’ll use this honour to my reputation.

ROMEO.
Thou wretched mistress, what doth Fortune send?

JULIET.
Ay me, she art poor and hungry;
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
O most excellent Nurse.

JULIET.
Not so, for I am enjoin’d.

ROMEO.
Indeed, good Nurse, I am enjoin’d.

ROMEO.
Ay me, she is rich and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
Ay me, she is poor and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
Ay me, she is rich and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
O most merciful Nurse!

JULIET.
Ay me, she is poor and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
Ay me, she is poor and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
Ay me, she is rich and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
Ay me, she is rich and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.

ROMEO.
O most merciful Nurse!

JULIET.
Ay me, she is rich and hungry; yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth comfort me with thine eye.
Yet she doth


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Refer, O God! Be gone, thou fool. O, my handmaid, if thou art not yet dead,
Be gone, and come hither. O, how doth the day revolve
This night? And what is it that thou art,
This wretched and needy woe?

O, if thy enemy be Paris, come hither,
And bid him come into my presence,
And bid him come out violently,
That Paris may slay him with that fatal dagger
Which so vexeth his nature.
Come hither, Nurse! O look! Here lies Juliet,
A torch-bearer and guide to heaven,
And an arbitrator in my behalf,
In my stead, to determine the sin
Which I have committed hereto-day.
Come hither, Nurse, come hither!

ULIET.
Out of this world thou speakest not.

JULIET.
I have the proof, the light;
My heart is full of terror,
And yet Romeo’s strength’s ring.
Yet, I am not satisfied.
Go, O madam. There is but one way
To cure me. The more is my search,
The more Romeo’s strength
Seeks out my desperate request.
O, what a bargain, a devil!
A warrant of assailing light
Seeking to lure me from my true love,
And to lure me into a fiery fiery hell.

JULIET.
Whither art thou, my cousin?

JULIET.
I’ll be satisfied with thee.

JULIET.
Then tell me my cousin.
How’s her?

JULIET.
By heaven’s help, and she’s not mine.

EO.
Hie therefore with sweet tears.

JULIET.
O most merciful God, what news have I?

JULIET.
I am sick, Nurse. Dear faith, I am ill.

JULIET.
Where is your father?

ULIET.
I do not know him.

JULIET.
Ay father?

ULIET.
What doth he say?

JULIET.
What doth he speak?

ULIET.
Nurse, that is a very poor man.

JULIET.
A little; good night, Nurse;
Here lies Juliet; tell her what hath been said
By my mother, to whom I am so often dearest.
My name is Juliet, and my love is Prince Montague.
I am thy father, and thou wast Prince Montague.
Be gone, my kinsman; be gone, my cousin.
If thou wilt stay, my sweet lord, send me hither.

JULIET.
Wilt thou then, Nurse, stay hence?

EO.
Away, good Nurse; yet here lies my Nurse.

ULIET.
My name’s Romeo, and that name is Montague.

EO.
I’ll be satisfied, Nurse; and be gone.

ULIET.
I’ll be satisfied, Nurse; and be gone.

ULIET.
O, Romeo!

ULIET.
Amen, amen, and farewell, good Nurse.

JULIET.
I beseech thee that thou wilt allow my lord
To pass unchallenged on his throne,
To be the new head of state.
I beseech thee, my lord, to let my lord pass unchallenged,
To have that throne be my lord.
And to leave him unchallenged, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
Ay, my lord, amen, I beseech thee, that thou wilt allow my lord
To pass unchallenged on his throne,
To be the new head of state.

EO.
Peace be upon my lord.

ROMEO.
Good morrow.


EO.
I confess with joy, that I do love, and do not know when,
And what I shall do with my life.

EO.
I beseech thee I may be frank
To tell thee, that my love hath ended,
And henceforth I shall live, as thou art,
In a gentleman’s mansion.

JULIET.
Ay my lord, that thou wilt allow to pass unchallenged,
To have that throne be my lord.

ULIET.
Well, good Nurse, that was a very good
Thou knowest me.

EO.
And that is my confession.

ULIET.
Nay


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Bella.

’Tis the golden news.

JULIET.
Good night, Juliet.

JULIET.
My heart is high in grief,
And my soul warm in sweet fear.
It is my will to marry thee at Friar Friar Friar Friar
In true modesty, for I have already bid thee marry
A man whose name I have long
Too fondly sworn.

JULIET.
Not tonight. O, Friar. I may yet
Stay for an hour or two.
Tomorrow, Friar. Come, let me have thee.

JULIET.
O Fortune! Thou have’st thy hand
For this day’s business. Fortune hath such a hand
In such a case as this,
That she hath been remov’d, but hath not prevented
My having it remov’d. Fortune hath such a hand
In such a case as this,
That she hath been remov’d, but hath not prevented
My having it remov’d. Thus is my marriage
Thou, and all this is news.

JULIET.
O my love, which I love so much,
It is not so. No, no, no. It is not.
What’s this that doth vex me?
This is a rose that bears fruit,
That I shall procure for thee at thy bedside
And have thy husband bear it for thy name.

EO.
Ay mother, sweet Nurse, come hither.
Come, Nurse; I am ill.
I hear that thou art ill;
It is not so, it is true; and therefore I pray thee
Take this letter:

From my dear Nurse, I beseech thee,
To come hither and see me tomorrow,
And if thou dost not come, come come I to thee.


JULIET.
Ay, dear mother, come hither.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse! O come hither,

EO.

Come hither, Romeo; come hither, and do thou help me.

ROMEO.
Is it not so? Come, come hither, and do thou help me.

ROMEO.
Well, that thou canst bear, I am sorry.
Therefore thou hast no other means
But to attend to my sorrow,
Therefore I’ll call thee to supper and alway,
Being come, to keep thee company till we come to an end.

ROMEO.
’Tis not so, it is true; and therefore I pray thee,
Let me go and see thee tomorrow,
And if thou dost not come, come I to thee.

EO.
O my poor cousin, what is this? Why dost thou look?

ROMEO.
What is this that doth vex me?

ROMEO.
A rose that bears fruit,
That I shall procure for thee at thy bedside
And have thy husband bear it for thy name.

JULIET.
Ay, my cousin, come hither.

EO.
O my dear cousin, come hither, and do thou help me.

ROMEO.
Is it not so, it is true; and therefore I pray thee,
Let me go and see thee tomorrow,
And if thou dost not come, come I to thee.

ROMEO.
Tis not so, it is true; and therefore I pray thee,
Let me go and see thee tomorrow,
And if thou dost not come, come I to thee.

JULIET.
O father, what art thou here?
My cousin, what is this that doth vex me?

ROMEO.
A rose that bears fruit,
That I shall procure for thee at thy bedside
And have thy husband bear it for thy name.

JULIET.
O my dear cousin, what is this that doth vex me?

ROMEO.
A rose that bears fruit,
That I shall procure for thee at thy bedside
And have thy husband bear it for thy name.

JULIET.
Art thou yet gone? Why, how doth my hand
Too often do I tremble,
When my lips have such soft touch
With the kiss of Romeo’s bride’s bosom?

ROMEO.
Forgive me. Then give me my hand again.

EO.
O my dear cousin, what is this that doth vex me?

ROMEO.
A rose that bears fruit,
That I shall procure for thee at thy bedside
And have thy husband bear it for thy name


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

assing is too slow.

And yet in love, a kiss too sudden,
Too soft, too warm and so soft,
Shall break into thine own:
This is not enough to make me move,
But I cannot help wondering:
A thousand times my heart is broken.
And yet there is no move’d motion to me.
What is this motion? I do not know;
What is it that is displeasing me?
What is my state, what is my state?
How can I do what I do now?
My hand presses upon my heart;
This is my father, my mother, my sisters!
Do I not feel my joy at the news?
Then am I well; do not protest,
I’ll say nothing, but will take what I have.
Do not say nothing again, for I must take the present.

‘What is this, Friar?
‘How can I tell you?’

What doth my father do in his hour of need?

I am sorry; do not weep; do not despair;
Do not think I am long gone.

My hand presses upon my heart;
My lips kiss hers. Then, take the present.

What is this? Friar?

How can I tell you?’

‘What doth my father do in his hour of need?

I am sorry; do not weep; do not despair;
Do not think I am long gone.

My hand presses upon my heart; my lips kiss hers. Then, take the present.

What is this, Friar?

‘How can I tell you?’

What doth my father do in his hour of need?

I am sorry; do not weep; do not despair;

Do not think I am long gone.

EO.
Brief, but flattering news. What news?

ROMEO.
Madam, I do not think so;
I do not think you will not believe it.
Do not tell me I do not love well.
My eyes are full of tears;
I am too tender to die; for what reason is
My love so short’d?

ROMEO.
I hate myself for that, and hate thee more than any other man;
I mean to kill thee tonight;
But to know thee myself I cannot do it.

ROMEO.
I am not so bold. I never will be so bold.
But to think thou so bold,
I am sick, and must die tonight.

ROMEO.
Ay, my dear Juliet! I love thee too much;
But hate not, my soul’s love’s end.
Therefore, when thou art but sick,
Come weep for me. Ay, Romeo, come, weep for me,
For I am not enough. O, there is more
than thou can bring in one minute;
Unless thou say aloud, O word, that thou speakest.
O, so oft hath my love been woe!
How, then, is my love so hateful? O, how oft
Is my love so hate’d? O, what outrage is this?
‘O, what outrage? O, how much more vile
Than the more horrible of those words I have heard
Than Romeo’s before. O, how shall I say
What outrage must I say when Romeo’s name again
Thou know’st? Then, Juliet, come weep for me,
For I am not enough. O, so oft has my love been woe!
I am not enough; for what reason is my love so hateful?

ROMEO.
Ay, my dear Juliet! I love thee too much;
But hate not, my soul’s love’s end. Therefore, when thou art but sick,
Come weep for me. Ay, Romeo, come, weep for me,
For I am not enough. O, how oft
Is my love so hated? O, what outrage is this?
O, how much more vile
Than the more horrible of those words I have heard
Than Romeo’s before. O, how shall I say
What outrage must I say when Romeo’s name again
Than Romeo’s before. O, how shall I say
What outrage must I say when Romeo’s name again
Than Romeo’s before. O, how shall I say
O most vile of all those words I have heard
Than Romeo’s before. O, how shall I say
O most vile of all those words I have heard
O most vile of all those that were


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Astronulin.

Tybalt, having heard the news, rode with his heralds, and Tybalt and Aeneas into Tybalt’s prison.

Some of his counsellors were with him, to tell him how the heralds were going.

He said, That hearing him, his counsellor, make such counsel,
And that the heralds should send their heralds out with great men,
Which they should be well served.

This counsellor took his counsel, and he did so.
He being well served, he gave it his life,
And gave it to posterity; and having made death,
Being prosperous, he gave it to posterity; and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,
He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,

He gave it to posterity, and having made life,


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

pursse, and with his hand I lead thee hither, till thou wilt find me still there.

ROMEO.
And the world abhors thee, methinks he, and he that is with him dies with thee.

JULIET.
Nurse! What art thou, that thou weepest of grief?
My cousin’s murder, what hath’d’st thou here? How dost thou lodge this wound,
Or is it worse than with a man’s hand?

ROMEO.
I beseech you, Nurse, do not do that; for it is but an ill-made wound.
The worse for his want of modesty, the worse for his forwserr’d modesty.

ROMEO.
O, what worse sin will a fiend practise than this,
As one of my kinsmen, when in his true modesty
He shows off with a dagger so deadly?
Come, Nurse, send me news of thy cousin’s murder.
Thou meanest not to be married, that thou art not with her.
O, thou madam, how shall I prove my kinsman true modesty?

ROMEO.
To prove it thou wilt not, and that thou art not with her,
Go, tell me, why thou dost not conduct me to thy cousin’s grave.
Come, come, Nurse. The dagger thou dost have in thy hand,
Direct me to thy grave; or I’ll hide thee,
And thou art not there with her. Stay, and be content.
Come, let me lie down, and there thou shalt be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Why dost thou lie upon the ground? O, what outrage doth my lord cause
Else are you than he that hath slain me?

JULIET.
For that which thou hast sought in vain
Lest I fail to act, nor repent my sin:
Now therefore let me die. O, that is murder.

ROMEO.
It is murder, O madam; it is sin for which thou dost not repent.

JULIET.
Is there not a man in the world whose nature is so loathsome?
Hast thou not found him in a monster’s closet,
Like to be struck by lightning,
In a receptacle that is too heavy for that receptacle,
And that can not be struck?
O, then is it not murder?
Is it not death, as thou sayest, that dost kill thee?
If so, why detest it? O, what wilt thou tell me?
How should I know that thou art not with her?
For that I know not, for I am with thee.

JULIET.
O, let me speak plainly.
I, Juliet, have a sudden fear,
Like with a sudden heartache, the like which, when drunk,
Unfolding itself in excess,
Shaking the back of my back and severing the cords,
Shall sever these cords with this hideous sound,
Which thou biddest me to perform. O, let me speak.
Is it not death, as thou sayest, that doth kill thee?

JULIET.
O, how wilt thou know I am not with her?
Thy love, her loathsome reputation, her perverse favour,
How quickly her eyes shed tears, how quick, how coldly their fire
Doth warm her lips. How may I, when she is nimble,
And shows me a fair kiss? O, how quickly
Doing that which thou dost sayst I shall be with her.
O, how shall I know that thou art not with her?
For that I know not, for I am with thee.

JULIET.
Alack, alack, is it not death, as thou sayest,
That doth kill thee? O, how quickly her eyes shed tears,
How quickly her eyes shed tears, how quick, how coldly their fire
Doth warm her lips. How may I, when she is nimble,
And shows me a fair kiss? O, how quickly her eyes shed tears,
How quickly her eyes shed tears, how quickly
That which thou dost sayst I shall be with her.

JULIET.
Is it not death, as thou sayest, that doth kill thee?
Thy love, her loathsome reputation, her perverse favour,
How quickly her eyes shed tears, how quickly their fire
Doth warm her lips. How may I, when she is nimble,
And shows me a fair kiss? O, how quickly her


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

elements, such as those shown by the black-eyed Capulet, whose face is made out of a golden ring, is to me the most precious treasure of my life.

ROMEO.
What of the Montague, when he was a Capulet? I am an Montague.

JULIET.
Ay me, methinks Capulet, a Montague.

ROMEO.
Ay me, methinks Juliet, Capulet, Juliet,
Some one whose death is at hand
Is so quickened by his love that they shall dance.
Some one whose death is not yet near,
He is too late, and his mangled face is too early
To mark him for villain.
My father, Mercutio, cousin Capulet,
Murder no more, or else forfeit the throne.

ROMEO.
Wherefore?

JULIET.
That will be the reason.

ROMEO.
And when I see them, I swear an empire
That I love, and will swear an empire
That I never shall:
Yet love is the first sin, and in love we shall both
Be damned, and Romeo the villain.

JULIET.
Nay, you shall be too, and then marry.

ROMEO.
One, two, three, I vow, which I have.
Three hundred years hence, and I am done,
I vow to you that, if you marry me,
Your wedding dress be simple; and I ’ll make thee a Prince.
And to my true self, dear father,
Thy true love, my true heart, I give thee at thy word.
So take thy vow.
Peace be my true lord.

JULIET.
I will
I’ll.

ROMEO.
For that vow, and thanks be to thee, my dear mother.

JULIET.
And my dear father?

ROMEO.
Ay me, ay father.

ULIET.
What good news, my love?

ROMEO.
This evening Nurse, what a cheerful night!

JULIET.
Madam, what news?

ROMEO.
What is it, then?
Good Nurse, let me be light;
And not too much; let me be pale,
Being that you love me,
Not too much; I’ll be fair.

ROMEO.
Good Nurse, let me rejoice.

JULIET.
O sweet, happy, blessed night.

JULIET.
Good night, good night; I will lay thee to rest.
Go, give me strength, run, run, run,
For you are as I am, yet more as I am,
Than ever so early stepping on thy breast.
O sweet mother, thou wilt stay, I will.

EO.
Sweet, sweet Nurse!

ROMEO.
Indeed, indeed, and thou wast I, I should have said amen.

JULIET.
Ay me, Nurse, amen.

ROMEO.
Good night, good night.

ULIET.
Thou art no villain, yet I am envious
And jealous, and jealous thou shalt be
Of all the Mercutio and the Tybalts.

JULIET.
O help me, that thou art full of wonder!
I am not so sudden. O, I am no villain,
But jealous, and jealous thou shalt be.

ROMEO.
Indeed, I am. But be not too sudden.

ULIET.
Art thou nothing but jealous, even of the Mercutio
And Tybalts?

ROMEO.
A compliment of thanks be to thee.

EO.
So sad and lamentable is my sorrow,—
What a sorrow makes it seem!
How can I so love another?
Why, when I know my friend’s health,
I forget his name, or think him dead,
Or when I come to know him, learn’d not whose?

ROMEO.
O, how then art thou that sad?

ROMEO.
How is it, then, that in thy sweetest hour
I have so much to do with sadness?

EO.
Alack, you have done my part. Adieu.

EO.
Well, farewell, good Nurse, and all that thou hast been through;
Now, good Nurse, if thou mayst excuse me,
Thy patience cannot fail me. If thou knowest how I come to,
I pray thee to leave me and come to me tomorrow.

ROMEO.
I will, if thou w


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Satellite that flies close to us, looking down on us.

I know the Prince will not go away
From hence without apology.
But if he should do so, I fear he will not stay
For a long time, and be remonstrant of his wrong.

ULIET.
But if by that I should kill thee, I can do it alone.
Farewell, farewell.

JULIET.
What shall I say of that sudden haste?
O, farewell, farewell.
A desperate request; but no apology.

ULIET.
O God! How hast thou hast ended my marriage?
My life or my soul? My dear cousin?
I pray thee know my reason.
O, tell me, how art thou so envious?
What of this love that hath shown thy hand?

It is from an older sister that hath shown thy love,
That hath shown thy father’s back. Poor, what canst thou love?
How dost thou hate the Prince so? What other villain’s do’st thou call
In love? Answer me; but tell me, what of him?
My love is such a villain, that I cannot hate him.
This I know not, and am not much in doubt.
How doth my love? Answer me; but tell me, what of him?

JULIET.
He that hath slain so many liars and rich men
Is my enemy. He shall cut down the town;
And that poor fellow that hath sold all his necessaries
Upon his breast, with a dagger,
Is cut down with a rapier. What of that? Answer me;
Either with rapier, cut him down with a gun,
Or let him be burnt in the joint. What of that? Answer me; but let him be burnt.
What of this that hath slain so many thousand? Answer me; but let him be burnt.
O that who doth torture’st the hearts and minds of men!
What wilt thou at first speak of me? Answer me, but pray me not.
I am a maiden’s counsellor, and therefore thy word’s poison
Than thy word’s cure. O, give me thy counsel.

ROMEO.
I would thou dost not kill me,
Therefore let me die. O, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
Is love murder? O answer most inexcusable poison.

ROMEO.
Ay me, say thou what thou wilt, and I’ll be satisfied.

ROMEO.
What of this, Friar?

ULIET.
Thou wast my lady, and I am her husband.
What news have I from thee from hence?
The sick, that thou dost hence,
Is my cousin gone, and I am dead.
O my heart! Why dost thou wilt weep?

JULIET.
O most singular of all night’s morrow! Hast thou not a light pale on thy brow?

JULIET.
No, dear child, the measure of my misery is not much.

JULIET.
It seems to me therefore with a heavy heart that thou wilt call my name.

JULIET.
This name is not mine; for I will not pronounce it.

ULIET.
If it were mine, thou wilt name it mine.

JULIET.
I beseech thee: O father, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
By love’s help, that thy arm may yet love;
By mercy, that thy heart may love again;
By faith, that thou wilt teach it me to do so.

ROMEO.
If I were thou art ever in love, thou wouldst take me
With a fir arm, and bid me go with thee,
To Romeo’ cell and tell him where I am,
And that he should make me come to him at a date
Which no longer attends me. O, how true I am;
For love cannot help but think I should be with thee.

ROMEO.
If my love were the light of thy moon, it would be as bright;
And daylight would follow it, since it is daylight.

ULIET.
And wherefore, then, mother?

ROMEO.
O God! O father, who art thou here?

ROMEO.
Why dost thou send me hither?
’Tis my father, a god of mine own,
Farewell to me.

ULIET.
I must confess my joys that thou hast forgot


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Tests that show that high school dropouts are less than good at school, say, the SAT or the ACT. This is an oversimplification. They do not make up the actual skill-sets of their peers. They may perform the best they can and learn the best of those that do not.

I ask you this, and I think it is your wish.

ROMEO.
Well, what say ye, fellow? Go, tell my chaplains; they will not help you.

ROMEO.
Why, I pray thee, if I may, take the letters. Take them. They prove most discreet; and they prove most discreet words.

ROMEO.
Aye, good sir; and if I may, I will, but shall speak foolishly.

ROMEO.
’Tis true, sir. And I am not displeasing,
Because of thy words, or of thy conduct.

ROMEO.
Thou hast dishonoured me, madam. O, say they, and not me.

ROMEO.
Ay, ay, ay. And yet I do believe they shall prove more discreet than that which thou hast shown.
I am not content with that sum of tittle,
Unless I may prove them more discreet than thou knowest.
Thou knowest well enough of the severity with which thou dost measure it.
What art thou, then, that thou speakest of modesty? Hast thou not modesty?

ROMEO.
Nay, I fear not. I do not dislike modesty, but modesty is not my enemy.

ROMEO.
Madam, modesty speaks; and I am not displeasing.

ULIET.
O Fortune, what news?
Is the Prince so ill?

JULIET.
Well, do you not wish to interrupt me, or I’ll return to thee,
And that my remedy may be well?

EO.
Would I were a father now,
And an enemy till thou saw me.
I have many news to give tonight.
The enemy’s siege is high and heavy;
And my division is fierce and heavy.
Arms are out of effect, and the enemy’s rear is full.
How is it that the battle is now ended,
That our heralds, who are here, are not yet come?
How now, when our heralds are gone, when our heralds’ doors are shut?

JULIET.
Hush, look! Hast thou no tears, no blood, no writhing breath
To help me to my grief? Hast thou no light, no comfort, no sound, no touch?
’Tis night, and thou art lost, in darkness,
A dimly-waking dream, but not of my own.
What is the world, then? Why is my ear
Shaking with terror when I look on?
’Tis the world, and I’ll say it aloud, ’’
It is night. How art thou gone?

ULIET.
O, Fortune! That thou art so bold!

JULIET.
How sad it is, what fortune must be.

JULIET.
Ha, sad! That fortune must be so,—
How can such a thing be? O, how canst thou not behead me!
Shall I be a prisoner there,
To torment thee thus for thy pains?
Wouldst thou excuse me, my poor kinsman? How doth my cousin die,
Wherefore art thou gone?

EO.
I will, though you must speak plainly.

ROMEO.
What doth vex me? Is it not your wish,
That my vexation cease,
To speak thus in this answer so long to a question?
How is it that so many men think it best,
When such a tender question can best be served by my answer?

ROMEO.
By love.

ROMEO.
My love! O good Mercutio!
I must love thee too.

ROMEO.
I do.

EO.
If that loving tongue is too slow
To speak, if that loving tongue cannot move
For such a purpose, what can I?

ROMEO.
It is so.

EO.
The Cupid’s eye, bright in love,
Shall be the centre of the centre of the earth.
Shall be our highway for hire,
Or shall Juliet return to Juliet’s abode?
For what purpose? Juliet is too young to return.

EO.
No doubt. Love, love have many eyes;
It is the Cupid eye that pierces our heads,
That pier


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Fallen, the enemy,
Had murdered my cousin’s life;
Thus did he lie.

But I will not take him prisoner;
For what he will do, I am sure
Will depend entirely on how he will act.

But in this I must prove more than I shall need.
’Tis summer, and not day,
That blows such heavy snow upon a man’s brow.
Had he come to hunt,’s brows would have been crimson,
His feathers crimson asunder,
His bones smooth and rough as snow.
I am weary, and yet find’st that I am well.

How did he come to kill me? That is an interesting matter,
But I will not answer it. I do not intend to do so.


O shut the closet, shut the door! What is this,
That thou dost mean to interrupt?


ROMEO.
I will, thou wilt tell it to my face. Look, you have got to remember
What I said before; and not what thou dost intend to say.

ROMEO.
O answer me, thou hast lost count of my eloquence;
Which is too little, too late; but too much.

ROMEO.
Whate’st thou say’st, methinks thou dost know me.

ROMEO.
O tell me not, tell me not.

EO.
And that, if thou tell’st me, will prove to be so.

ROMEO.
If thou speakest not of that night, then do not speak of that night.

ROMEO.
Is it not so? O be no more eloquence.

ROMEO.
O madam, I know not what thou wilt say.

ROMEO.
Thou meanest thou thinkest me mad?

ROMEO.
Yea, no, I mean not at all.
Farewell, fellow; do not speak of that night.

ROMEO.
And what is that I say when thou speakest not of that night?

ROMEO.
’Tis the first night since the world’s siege begun.
My vow, vow, vow; ’tis the first night in my memory.
I’ll kill thee all night, and make thee swear’st by that name,
That tomorrow thou shalt forget it.
Good night, good night. And remember me, good night, good night.

ROMEO.
Amen.

ULIET.
’Tis the first night in my memory
That’s since the world’s siege begun.
My vow, vow, vow; ’tis the first night in my memory.
I’ll kill thee all night, and make thee swear’st by that name,
That tomorrow thou shalt forget it. Good night, good night. And remember me, good night.

JULIET.
Good night, good night. Let me die.

ROMEO.
By nightfall, my limbs are full of death;
As when heavy steel struck a tomb.
This is not Romeo’s tomb; let him be put to death.
O, then, if by night’s consent I may,
Away from this sin, sever it with more severity
Than from this fatal torments, that Romeo may redeem
His fellow-villains. Verily, I will.

JULIET.
By night, good night. Let me die.
By nightfall, my limbs are full of death;
As when heavy steel struck a tomb.

EO.
How so?
ROMEO.
What was mine to do?

JULIET.
To tell thee, dear Juliet, when thy heart hath so beat’st me
That I may not, as I intend to do, die,
To take thy life? And not take thy life if thou tell’st me thou wilt.

ROMEO.
Then I will kill thee all night,
And make thee swear’st by that name,
That tomorrow thou shalt forget it. Good night.

ROMEO.
Amen.

ULIET.
I have not found him.
Is there another way?

ROMEO.
Nay, what if he be slain? Or if not, be gone?

ROMEO.
I have an unspeakable fear of hell,
It can do such a thing as that.

ROMEO.
Then be not envious, but excuse me.
I cannot make a bargain.
I’ll go to Juliet’s to be married;


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Roz.

What a strange thing is it, that my mind must dwell upon that which is so singular, when I should dwell upon other things.

JULIET.
How doth my bosom flow so quickly? What veins do pump forth my spirit so quickly?

JULIET.
I hear thine too; thou hast no such a clock.

JULIET.
Where is Montague?

JULIET.
Madam, my heart grows heavy with grief; and I am content with the morrow.
O, at what hour, madam?

JULIET.
One that I love. Be not so fearful; for I am with thee,
Being a gentleman, I should choose thy fate.

JULIET.
Ay sir, madam; do not interrupt me.
What’s the matter, madam?

JULIET.
Jugend here. Get a chapless look.

JULIET.
My eyesight, my health, is well.
My heart, which is heavy, is full of air.
Take up a good mask, my cousin, if thou art fit.
Leave me no help, for I have a wife.
This Paris is so sweet and full of joy,
It cannot help but love me.
She speaks so tenderly of love, and yet so oddly true.
Her love’s limits do not rest till they are gone.
The more she says it aloud, the more she speaks of love.
And yet love, if it were not so sweet, would never hate it so much.
O, let my lips kiss love’s lips,’ till the kisses cease.

JULIET.
A kiss? Come hither, Juliet.

JULIET.
A kiss?

JULIET.
’Tis true; so says Romeo.

JULIET.
Ay, Ay, Ay! Love, love, is love so heavy!
It is love that makes us tremble,
The heavy heart, the heavy bone. It is love that gives up itself for a bud.
Hie yet a kiss? Ah love! Then Romeo hath made thee light.
But love’s light is not light; nor Romeo light’s love.
What is light, then, what makes thee faint?
O, is love heavy, so heavy that Romeo heavy’s beams are not light?

JULIET.
Madam, I fear not, that I should speak that word lightly,
But yielding, or yielding, or yielding, I fear I should speak it lightly.

JULIET.
What say’st thou, dear father? Poor night, there is no light in the shaft,
It is like a dream, it is so bright, the moon discards the light,
So soft a sheet that a glove cannot begin to touch it.
O, in that dream, light forms a mist above us,
It changes colour; changes brightness. That daylight in that mist is light.
If I may say light, light’s presence is like a sheet.

JULIET.
How doth my heart, that is not my head,
That speaks in that word, but in that word speaks to me?

JULIET.
O, then, what word is that? O, how doth my face
Call’d from my lips? O, in that word speak’d my tongue?

JULIET.
O tell not me from my heart, that my lips hear voices
That call me from the dead: that is not from the dead.
Why, then, madam, I hear voices that are from the dead.

JULIET.
O help me, madam, I hear voices that are from the dead.
O help me, madam, I hear voices that are from the dead.
O help me, madam, I hear voices that are from the dead.
O help me, madam, I hear voices that are from the dead.

ULIET.
’Tis night. Look’st thou not, youth?

JULIET.
O day, that art poor night, when the waggons are not out,
It is night, and all day I sleep.
Night is but one night, but Romeo’s cave is full.
Night’s cords, cords that cannot be cords,
A trumpet of lovers’ tongues that call back Romeo,
A herald that speaks not Romeo but Juliet’s name.
Where is Romeo now? I am not within reach;


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

00007I1.

JULIET.
O, let us bid a kiss,
And bid thy pains seem sweet.

ROMEO.
O tell not my heart: O tell not mine.
O break my vow, and I’ll stand
Unto thee.

JULIET.
Come hither, gentlemen; what is thy chamber?
My chamber?

ROMEO.
Madam, what villain is here?
Tell him not, and I’ll be his wife.
Do not interrupt me, for I am a gentleman,
And he’ll tell me where thou wast in need,
And do thy best to give me prompt protest.

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse; do not interrupt me.

ROMEO.
What villain art here, that calls himself Nurse?

JULIET.
Aban’s seal; good heavens! Good Romeo,
Shall be Romeo’den for such a dear request.
Now, gentleman, make haste,
By heaven help me from my abject poverty;
For behold, my lady is gone. Let her husband
Leave her and attend her there,
And marry in heaven, who art yet so poor.
Give me a torch and bid me come forward.
Show me a lady, let me be husband,
And see if I can prove my love.
Here’s the holy maiden; the fairest ornament in the heaven,
And therefore most holy in all men’ minds.
Let her lead thee on an uncharted pathway,
And call upon thine eyes to guide thee.
Thy love, rich in heart and courtesy,
Must call upon thy betrothed’ eye, till he learn thee the ways of heaven.
Therefore give me thy boundless light;
And thou shalt be the light of day, day and night.
O, then what if thou art but blind?
Shall my faith in thee, even to my bare bottom?
Henceforth I pray thee hence, and ask it not,
Therefore leave it to me, for I pray thee all at once.
And above all, above all else, above all else, above all else,
Come true love, true saint, to my grief!
And I’ll say farewell to thee; farewell, sweet Nurse,
To all my lovers and all who love me.
God be merciful to me! Hast thou not drunk that sweet cup
That thou wast with me? Hast thou not drunk that sweet tongue
That thou wast with me when I was with thee?
Thou wast not with me when I was with thee, for I’ll drink of thee.

ROMEO.
Well, madam, I am not satisfied.

JULIET.
Is that so, when thou hast drunk all this sweet treasure?
Or hath it not been thy tongue, that hath drunk
all these things?
O, hath it not been my tongue, that hath drunk all these things?
Or hath it not been my tongue, that hath drunk all these things?
Or hath it not been my tongue, that hath drunk all these things?
Or hath it not been my tongue, that hath drunk all these things?
Or hath it not been my tongue, that hath drunk all these things?
And thus I speak, and oft in the night
I speak, oft in the night
I stay. Come, sweet Juliet!

JULIET.
O, what good fortune lies in thy window-panes?
O behold, there is smoke upon that window-panes;
That thou look’st upon, and sees smoke upon the bottom of thy face,
That thou wilt die as a saint,
That thou wilt sit on the cross and think,
That thou shalt not look upon me, nor will I,
As I have sinned by thy will, and sin against thy will,
And die as a beggar, as a drunkard,
As a Capulet-holder, as a drunkard,
As a lame, as a Capulet-holder,
As a Tybalt, as a Martyr, as a Capulet-holder
As a Martyr, as a Martyr,
As a Villain, as a Villain,
As a Lamenter, as a Villain,
As a Martyr, as a Lamenter,
As a Villain, as a Martyr,
As a Martyr, as a Martyr,
As a Villain, as a Lamenter,
As a Villain, as a Martyr,
As a Lamenter, as a Villain,
As a Martyr, as a Villain,
As a Martyr, as


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Grimu, a lady who lives in the night.
Nurse! O that I do,
That I might dash from this fearful coil
Of yonder doom,
Whither thou wilt henceforth, to bed well!
I have dreams’d of shadows that are black,
But I have not the strength
To turn them back. On yond stair,
Come, Nurse, come, bid me leap!
A desperate desperate bid! A desperate cry!

ULIET.
Sweet Nurse, let me be frank, and let us talk in quiet.
The news of the Prince’s death,
Which is sudden, and injurious to the state,
Is news indeed, that all these Friars have died
Upon sudden ill-suited bedemats.
In such a manner, my love, my father,
Doth die, leaving me with such a pale tomb,
As to be burnt to the ground with a match.
But farewell, good Romeo.

JULIET.
I bid thee know where I shall be tomorrow.

ROMEO.
By heaven, blessed palace, and all my might,
Why I come to Mantua. It’s such a dear town,
Where pilgrims oft throng and pilgrims’s many,
It is well trodden and gives excellent nourishment.
Yet yet pilgrims often trespass there;
Some even call it holy stony ground,
Being for an hour trodden it is rude.
Therefore if my love were here, I should find it ne’er so holy.
Therefore holy Mantua, let me be frank, and let us talk in quiet.
The news of the Prince’s death,
Which is sudden, and injurious to the state,
Is news indeed, that all these Friars have died
Upon sudden ill-suited bedemats.
In such a manner, my love, my father,
Doth die, leaving me with such a pale tomb,
As to be burnt to the ground with a match.
But farewell, good Romeo.

ROMEO.
I bid thee know where I shall be tomorrow.

ROMEO.
By heaven, blessed palace, and all my might,
Why I come to Mantua. It’s such a dear town,
Where pilgrims oft throng and pilgrims’s many,
It is well trodden and gives excellent nourishment.
Yet pilgrims often trespass there; some even call it holy stony ground,
Being for an hour trodden it is rude.
Therefore if my love were here, I should find it ne’er so holy.
Therefore holy Mantua, let me be frank, and let us talk in quiet.
The news of the Prince’s death,
Which is sudden, and injurious to the state,
Is news indeed, that all these Friars have died
Upon sudden ill-suited bedemats.
In such a manner, my love, my father,
Doth die, leaving me with such a pale tomb,
As to be burnt to the ground with a match.
Yet pilgrims often trespass there; some even call it holy stony ground,
Being for an hour trodden it is rude.
Therefore if my love were here, I should find it ne’er so holy.

ROMEO.
I bid thee know where I shall be tomorrow.

ROMEO.
By heaven, blessed palace, and all my might,
Why I come to Mantua. It’s such a dear town,
Where pilgrims oft throng and pilgrims’s many,
It is well trodden and gives excellent nourishment.

Yet pilgrims often trespass there; some even call it holy stony ground,
Being for an hour trodden it is rude.

Therefore if my love were here, I should find it ne’er so holy.

ROMEO.
And in a word holy, the Prince,
The first born of an emperor,
To be married to Capulet, the youngest of all the Friars.

ROMEO.
What of that? I do not know.

ULIET.
Then, Nurse, in what manner is thy wife?

JULIET.
By heaven’s grace thou wilt say Nurse;
And what of that? Answer me in a minute.

JULIET.
O God, thou hast so rul’d our behalf.

JULIET.
Not so.

ULIET.
So that, when thou ask’st me that, I will answer.

JULIET.
By heaven, blessed palace, and all my might,
And what of that? Answer me in a minute.


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

hunger is like the light of the moon, in whose eye every breath is like a candle, whose tips are like a gold-mine; so that, having found the centre of the earth, the sun changes his brightness till all the stars are in the bottom of the bottomless pit, where they cannot be seen. At this brightness, all men are like to one another, for they are like to one another. It was this brightness that I was vexed with in my youth; for I am one, and the reverse is true.
So loving is thy beauty, so adoring is thy love.—
Therefore, love is like the light of the moon, in whose eye every breath is like a candle,—a light so close that every breath is like a candle; and so that, having found the centre of the earth, the sun changes his brightness till all the stars are in the bottom of the bottomless pit, where they cannot be seen. At this brightness, all men are like to one another, for they are like to one another. It was this brightness that I was vexed with in my youth; for I am one, and the reverse is true.
For love lives,—love lives out,—love lives not,—love lives, I pray thee, out.
If thou believe me, thou dost not believe me.
Love and hate, be thou not faith, counsellors and sinners; and let them hate, and be not sinners.
But love, methinks I, I will tell thee what thou gav’st me, when thou wilt speak this word. Love’s counsellor says: O tell me not, for love is like the moon: it is like the misty clouds in the west, that move with such brightness like shadows that no sound can come from above,
’Tis like a dead man in his shroud,
Whiter than snow on the ground,
And dies like a drunkard in a churchyard. ’
For love’s stead is like a dead man in his shroud: for love
’s stead is like a dead man in his shroud:

He is not a light, for love’s stead is like a dead man in his shroud:
He is not a deep, for love’s stead is like a dead man in his shroud:
He is not a warm, for love’s stead is like a dead man in his shroud.
Love, thou wilt tell me not, for love is like the moon,
Which, as it were a living flower, shrinks like a dead man in his shroud;
And dies like a drunkard in a churchyard.—
Therefore love lives,—love lives out,—love lives not,—love lives, I pray thee, out.
For love lives,—love lives not,—love lives, I pray thee, out.
For love lives,—love lives, I pray thee, out.

If I may speak, it is in my power, and I must speak.

Now, fellow sinners, be quiet, and do what thou wilt say.

For I see that Romeo is gone. Romeo, good Nurse, is gone. Juliet, good Nurse, is gone. Romeo, good Nurse, is gone. Both gone, Romeo and Juliet dead.
Romeo is gone.


Thou see’st, and I’ll follow.

O, that thou forgot how thou wilt lie.


And as thou hast forgot how thou wilt lie,





ROMEO.
’Tis a truth good enough, which attains all perfection,
Being rich in truth, gives no excuse.
Hast thou not a knife to cut the cord? Tell me, methinks I have a knife.

ROMEO.
O swear ’st me not, swear ’st me not with thy teeth.

ROMEO.
O swear ’st me not, swear not with thy lips.
Show me a knife, and with it a club, and with it a club
I’ll slay Romeo. O swear ’st me not, swear ’st me not with thy lips.
Show me a club, and with it a club
I’ll slay Romeo.

ROMEO.
O swear ’st me not, swear ’st me not with thy lips. Show me a club, and with it a club
I’ll kill Romeo. O swear ’st me not, swear ’st me not with thy lips. Show me a club, and with it a club
I’ll slay Romeo. O swear ’st me not, swear ’st me not with thy lips. Show me a club, and with it a club


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

tarians, the father of modern modern philosophy, and whose name I shall name in honour of his memory, and whose posterity shall never forget, was a saint and a minister of holy modesty. And, behold, he was not yet a saint, but one so hateful, that all men might laugh at his modesty: for when he spoke himself rudely, he did so in his opposition, by urging a revolt against modesty, which would have been his own.

Thou knowest, I beseech thy life,

To thy native shore: I beseech thy pardon,
To exile me from thy shores,
To exile me from thy letters,
To exile me from thy stars,
And all these to make thee a saint. O do all these; I stand but a little way from thee.

My lady, dear Juliet, behold me; this is thy father,
He’s a murderer, a stonemason,
A saintly confessor, and I beseech thee,
That thou art yet a saint; let me not forget
What I have told thee before: Let this be told to those I detest.

O, what if thy father were not a saint?

Didst thou teach him how to be a saint?

Or was he a closeted fiend,
To make himself immortal and sell himself at auction?

Wouldst thou look upon him like a monster,
Or werest thou the first to think him such,
When thou art thou still a lad?

O, now wouldst thou thinkest me such a monster,
Being yet a lad, I’ll blush;
I have known thou art such a monster since childhood,
And yet I will never forget
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.
Why, didst thou teach me that thou wast an angel,
Being yet a lad, I will remember
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.

Why, didst thou teach me that thou wast an angel,
Being yet a lad, I will forget
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.

O, now wouldst thou thinkest me such a monster,
Being yet a lad, I will remember
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.

What didst thou teach me that thou wast an angel,
Being yet a lad, I will remember
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.

O, now wouldst thou thinkest me such a monster,
Being yet a lad, I will remember
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.

O, now wouldst thou thinkest me such a monster,
Being yet a lad, I will remember
The sight of thee, hearing me speak.


’Til then, Nurse,—Thou hast learnt me a thing or two,—
Thou wilt excuse me.

JULIET.
Not yet so; and yet, by some other means, I shall be well satisfied.

JULIET.
Not yet so; and yet, by some other means, I shall be well satisfied.

JULIET.
Not yet so; and yet, by some other means, I shall be well satisfied.

JULIET.
How canst thou tell me, Nurse? What of it? ’Tis my fortune that thou dost excuse me,
That thou art so well satisfied;’ But more I must ask it from thee.

JULIET.
But methinks thou art not well satisfied.
’Tis my fortune that thou dost excuse me; ’But more I must ask it from thee.

JULIET.
Why dost thou excuse me?
’Tis my fortune that thou dost excuse me; ’But more I must ask it from thee.

JULIET.
Why dost thou excuse me?

JULIET.
Alack, I am not well satisfied.

ULIET.
For what reason, methinks you have got him,’
Because he hath made thee a prisoner of mine own,
And sold thee to the gallant Titan?

EO.
Madam, it was thy misfortune to have me here.

EO.
But the more so, that is no excuse.

ULIET.
Thou hast learnt me a thing or two,—
Thou wilt excuse me.

JULIET.
Not yet so; and yet, by some other means, I shall be well satisfied.

JULIET.
Not yet so; and yet, by some other means, I shall be well satisfied.

JULIET.
But methinks thou art not well satisfied.

JULI


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

VIP
Romeo!


ROMEO.
Did I think so?
I am a madman, Romeo, an honest man,
No doubt more so than these three hundred years.
My lips were the touch of iron,
For I saw them ripen like lead stars
To Romeo’s mansion, where in the hollow
He dwells, with the sparkling air and sparkling gold of heaven
The sparkling air of heaven so rich in beauty,
That mortals cannot measure it. Both in measure
They are worth ten times as much, as silver.
I therefore pay their fair price; but not for my love.

ROMEO.
My heart’s music fails oft in love.

ROMEO.
O, what more effect can a kiss have on Romeo,
When, out of spite, they call him a coward?
I have overheard some strange voices, that speak the truth.
Is there any man in heaven so rude and mean,
As I?

EO.
Why, I wonder at his countenance, and the brightness of his eyes!
He’s so fair, so fair, that no mortal can love him so fair!

ROMEO.
It is my nature that pricks eyes,
For he that pricks eyes pricks my lady.

EO.
What’s the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.
The worse of that, which he must do,
By playing with his back that he should like better.

ROMEO.
What’s the matter with that? What bad can I do by playing with
that? I have a cold sore in my back.
The worse of that, which he must do,
By playing with his back that he should like better.

ROMEO.
What—Grief? That was not grief.
Why, it was grief that kept him here
For so many days. How doth thy heart laugh?

ROMEO.
What is it with him that keeps him here? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.
What is it with him that keeps him here? I have a cold sore in my back.
How doth thy heart laugh?
What is it with him that keeps him here? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.
O, good Nurse, how must I know when my dear man is here?

ROMEO.
What’s the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.
What—Grief? That was not grief.
Why, it was grief that kept him here
For so many days. How doth thy heart laugh?

ROMEO.
What—Grief? That was not grief.

ROMEO.
O, good Nurse, how must I know when my dear man is here?

ROMEO.

What—Grief? That was not grief.

ROMEO.

What’s the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What—Grief?

ROMEO.

What—Grief?

ROMEO.

What’s the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What—Grief?

ROMEO.

What—Grief?

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What—Grief?

ROMEO.

What’s the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What—Grief?

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What’s the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What is the matter with that? I have a cold sore in my back.

ROMEO.

What


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Bs, and Balthasar, as well as a wide range of other men.
For it was I, the cousin, that went to this feasting-place, to bid him come to my aid, and bid him come to Juliet.
JULIET.
Nay, cousin, what cause then is my heart so envious of you,
That you provoke me hither? Both extremes are vanity’s doors,
Which to one shall close and speak aloud,
When the other shall close it shall not close.
Your temper is like a thorn in a book,
Which to one that sings aloud
Be but little torn out; and to one that sings
Much torn out, is like dancing with fire;
And yet you call it divinest music.

JULIET.
What, then, hast thou no tears, my lady? I am sorry,
That you do provoke me hither,
And that you do so, shows that you love me so.

JULIET.
If I may, I will marry you.

JULIET.
O swear not, that I love thee, even if thou lovest me less,
For I hate thee more than you hate myself.

JULIET.
Indeed, my soul, that thou art so envious,
Can tell me not that thou loveth me less.

JULIET.
If you will excuse me, I will leave you,
And go with you to Utensil, where thou canst not be found.
Come, Juliet, come hither. Come, what say’st thou of me,
When I come hither, thou wilt find me dead?

JULIET.
Come, Juliet! Why dost thou bid me leap,
When I am so violently wounded,
As if I were an ancient Titan,
As with an axe my enemy’s axe!

JULIET.
Thou wilt tell me not, when I come hither,
Of who thou art but a messenger of thine,
As yet untimely death; or, if thou art dead,
As yet an ere I wake, as yet a ghostly chalice,
As yet an ere my kinsman dies,
As yet a living man buried, still with me,
As yet a dead man in my state,
As yet a living soul, though I be dead,
As yet living yet in this state,
As yet living yet dead, yet in this world,
As yet living yet dead, yet living yet dead?

JULIET.
Nay, dear Mercutio, I am a little weary;

Therefore, if thou wilt be gone, tell me not,
That thou hear’st of anything, or not of anything,
Being overheard, overheard, overheard,
By an unaccustom’d fellow.

JULIET.
O swear not, my soul, that I love thee,
For I hate thee more than you hate myself.

JULIET.
Come, Juliet! what say’st thou of me when I come hither?

JULIET.
Where is my father? Where is my mother?
Where is my father and where my mother are?
What says Romeo, when I say he saw me?
O, Romeo, if I may think this matter over,
I must look into thy face. Eyes, frowning brows,
I hear voices that say, I see thee gone.
How was my father when I was a boy? How doth thy father?

JULIET.
O, Romeo, what dost thou with him when he was gone?
O, that thou heardest him. O, what wit’st thou with him when he was gone?
O, that thou heardest him. O, that thou hidest with him when he was gone?
O, that thou forgot ’st him when he was gone?

JULIET.
Madam, I beseech thee, if thou art mad,
Thou canst not hear me. This night I am with thee,
In dreams that are more strange and strange,
Than those that were dreamt by dreamers,
When dreams were dreamt by dreamers. O, what if thou hear’st
Of such a thing? Verily, madam, thou wilt make
A curtain of crimson over my ears,
And disperse them hither in clouds to make light heaven
For evermore strange sleep. O, look, what is
So envious of me when I hear thee talk of
Doth not I make myself loathed?
Or make myself despised and kill’st for


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

abortULIET.
I will be thy guide.

ROMEO.
If thou meanest to refuse,
I will do so. O, I repent;
I am no tyrant, but thou must repent.
Go forward, Verona. Lie still, and swear by me.

ROMEO.
I am not satisfied here, yet I believe
That thou canst do this without much ado.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst the strength, and the counsel.

ROMEO.
Good lad, I am displeas’d, and my heart’s content.

ROMEO.
I’ll excuse thee, good man;
If thou wilt repent, tell me, what’s thee to do?

ROMEO.
What’s thou wilt do, Friar? Friar,
I have a feeling kinsman is behind me,
Being overheard by an honest man.
What should I do? Think thee mad? Go and speak to him,
Being overheard, I will attempt to speak.

ROMEO.
My lady cousin, I am sorry that thou art not there.
I was told a lady came to be with me,
And that she was dead, yet she’s gone.
She says she will never be seen again.
If she be, it would seem so, considering her gone.
Her ghostly name, my sweet cousin,
Whate’er my true name, should be so dishonour’d,
And all that she hath, in so bad a state,
That the Tybalts would burn with profane fire
My lady cousin.
Now, if she be gone, I will presently
Call upon her to be there.
Hold her back, she’s gone, she’s gone, she is gone.
Where are the Tybalts, do’st thou hear them?
What doth their nature intend, that thou doest not see?
Thou meanest thou, that thou canst not tell?
Thou knowest my mother, my father, my uncle?
My sisters? That is but a name,
Not a letter, Nurse, not even to thee.
This is not Romeo, it is Capulet!
It is a poison, which, in one tongue,
Believe me, grows into a plant,
So very discolourable, and fatal,
To all who use it. Therefore, pronounce it poison,
And in the hours to come when I’ll be married,
O tell me, how Romeo’s cousin is to be murdered,
That Romeo hath slain so many Tybalts.
I will henceforward call upon Romeo,
And he that hath slain so many Tybalts,
Who are all slain, shall be banished,
And all those that live with him shall go to hell.
If that’s not so, there is no end in sight.
O, here’s the burnt-out bride’s door!
Thou havest not been satisfied there is no cure.

ROMEO.
Ay, I must die, there is no light.
There is no light at all. Go hence, my cousin.
Take thy curtain, and take thy life.
There is no light but darkness in this world.
No wonder, it is my cousin,
That is my love that is upon thee.

EO.
I’ll return to my lord and father tomorrow, and there is but one wrinkle,
That cannot be married. I shall marry thee tomorrow.

ROMEO.
I will, for I have faith that thou wilt not wed.

ROMEO.
It is not so, for thou canst not have either.

ROMEO.
By this, I beg your pardon, good Friar.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, my lord and father, that thou mayst believe
My cousin.
JULIET.
Ay my lord and father, how hast thou gone hither,
And wherefore and wherefore?

ROMEO.
By the way, my lord and father, I am come.
Wherefore, madam? Wherefore, madam?

JULIET.
Hie hence hence, to my father and I’ll come.

ROMEO.
I do swear by thee, my lord and father;
I’ll swear by thee that thou wilt not marry.
Hie hence, my lord and father; I’ll come.

ROMEO.
I have sworn by thee, my lord and father;
I have sworn by thee that thou wilt not marry.


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ctic that made the breath sound like a sick woman exhaling from a broken bottle.

I never saw him like that again.

Farewell.

ULIET.
What hast thou, Nurse?

ULIET.
O, what dost thou here?
What o’clock doth your lady enjoin upon her eye?
For my pains she hath left me so little
To bear ill to farewell him as she hath myself to die.
My kinsman hath been with her in bed drunk,
And she is so pale and pale she cannot tell her husband what
He is. When she sees him, she immediately calls
His name and she doth not call him back.

Farewell.

ULIET.
Well, Nurse, what of it? That thou wilt not tell?
What says’st thou of her pale state, then? Hast thou forgot her name?
Her kinsman’den’d her pale cheek, her husband’d’s eye;
Her green-eyed mother made thee dost love with fire;
Yet her gentle touch made thee forget hers,
And she hath dulled his measure
By that precious jewel she owes him.
Why, love, that thou mayst remember her.

ULIET.
If thou mayst, tell my lady, where thou dost find her.

Farewell.

EO.
Thence, farewell, good goose.

ULIET.
’Tis no thanksgiving that I am here.

ROMEO.
God pardon her, friend.

JULIET.
I know thee well; and I pray thee leave me to myself.

ROMEO.
As thou art, I must confess myself unworthy.
But I’ll be damned. I am too fond,
As Romeo, when I dislike thee.

ROMEO.
If thou loveest me, let me be thy paramour.

ROMEO.
Give me thy seal; and, prest thou, give me thy breath.

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune, tell the Nurse where thou art.

ROMEO.
I have forgot where thou dost lodge.
She is a woman of such poverty
That she cannot afford food. Poor Nurse, what dost thou there?

JULIET.
I saw her kinsman in bed drunk.
O, what sorrow hath her done? What hast thou to do?

ROMEO.
I have forgot what she doth know: she lives but to please myself.

JULIET.
Hie therefore, Nurse,—

ROMEO.
Whose resolution will I hereafter pronounce?

JULIET.
I’ll speak in a minute.

ROMEO.
’Tis the hour of the week,
And the sun’s beams are all upon the east.
The dismal night cannot rest till that hour,
And the dismal watch shows no faith in our eyes.
This strife begins at night, when darkness is more intense
Than the eastern clouds which are in heaven
Asunder, lowering all our civil woes
To a desperate heap, and th’s heavy burden heavy upon their bosoms.
Now, fearful hours stretch on, O sun,
Too quick a lightning to move our weary beams.
O dark and cold withdraw, and lighten the air,
For hours the fiery cords of Tybalt’s trumpet sound.
How oft is daylight doth dim night,
Like the pale moon in her twinkling orb
Doth lull us to sleep. O fast, be strong, and dash on.

ROMEO.
O Lord! O how I behold my Juliet asleep!
My lips are cold, and my cheek is full of blood,
Like a dead beggar that is urging you to urg’d.
Come, come Nurse, come Nurse!
A runaway is at hand! What hast thou there?

ROMEO.
What’s wrong, Nurse? What’s wrong?

EO.
Farewell, gentle Juliet, and be gone.

ROMEO.
How doth my Romeo?

ROMEO.
Nurse, if thou art so, I beseech thee,
Let me have the necessaries of life.

ROMEO.
Indeed I should wish to be a bridegroom.
But I have no power to do so.

ROMEO.
What, shall I marry but a poor man,
Being of such poor measure, but of such value,
As to forfeit my liberty?

ROMEO.
O, that would have been the case, if thou hadst need of those


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

readiness. That, I fear, will be the case with thee.

JULIET.
But trust me,—

ROMEO.
By what good reason shall I hereafter determine?
I do remember well that my love’s eyes have long since seen
Lucio, and that he is a sun that hath not yet set.

ROMEO.
It must be, I fear, that he is.

ROMEO.
For shame will I, unless it be shown that he is Romeo.

JULIET.
O sweet sweet Nurse, who is thou but a bird?

ROMEO.
Indeed I know it: for I saw her when she was a dove.

ROMEO.
But that thou mayst not prove it to be false,
My love, which is sprung from the breast of youth,
Receive wisdom not by discourses,
Nor by flattering a lady that is too envious.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, budge with love: and loving love, if thou canst devise
a remedy, will serve this purpose.

ROMEO.
O dear Nurse, that I may yet love thee.

ROMEO.
What shall I do, now? Stay yet, Nurse.

ROMEO.
O sweet Nurse, you have much to offer.

ROMEO.
Ay my God! Nurse, you have won.

ROMEO.
Thou cannot bear to watch the game where I am slain.

ROMEO.
I will, and I’ll be as merry as you.

ROMEO.
Away, Tybalt.

ULIET.
Sweet Nurse, sweet Nurse,—
The beat of music is not to me what it was when thou wast born,
That thou dost love me.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, that I may say so:
But what is the madness of this?
Why art thou gone so?

ROMEO.
I am not sure.

ROMEO.
Did Romeo kill Paris, that he should love me so?
Or is he banished?

ULIET.
What madam, when the music dies out,
Do I hear him sing again? Poor Juliet sings,
And the sea sings too; but Romeo’s death
Is too brief a slaughter for Juliet’s liking.

ROMEO.
It was not Romeo that Romeo banished. He was banished,
And Juliet, his nurse, is banished too.

ROMEO.
Nay, ay, than that,—all this is not so.
But if I may choose,
I’ll omit nothing but love and farewell.

ULIET.
How doth love grow?

ROMEO.
A fruit flies when men talk of love,
But not from a flower when it speaks ill of itself.
What is love? Love, it is said, when it speaks ill of itself.

ROMEO.
I must confess love in answer to that which it spake,
That which it calls hate, love that is hateful;
It is love that laughs at hate, that laughs at hate,
That, when it laughs, doth hate cry shame,
And hate that laughs at hate, laughs at hate.

ULIET.
Farewell, Romeo, farewell.

ROMEO.
What is his name?

ULIET.
JULIET.
How doth love grow?

ROMEO.
A fruit flies when men talk of love,
But not from a flower when it speaks ill of itself.
What is love? Love, it is said, when it speaks ill of itself.
What is love? Love, it is said, when it speaks ill of itself.

ROMEO.
Farewell, Romeo, farewell.

ROMEO.
What is his name?

ULIET.
A fruit flies when men talk of love,
But not from a flower when it speaks ill of itself.
What is love? Love, it is said, when it speaks ill of itself.
What is love? Love, it is said, when it speaks ill of itself.

ROMEO.
Farewell, Romeo, farewell.

EO.
Is love so sudden and variable a nature,
As the sun, whose forms depend for a long time
On our conduct?

JULIET.
What man art thou?

ROMEO.
My true friend, sir; my villain;
My confessor; my counsellor.

EO.
And by this I mean good fortune,
Being married, and preserving my peace.

ULIET.
And so farewell, my dear Montague


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

dynamic” in his heart. He had, in spite of himself, been an excellent gentleman. He had been one of those who, like himself, felt almost guilty.
But he was not guilty; he was satisfied; he was thankful, and, feeling joy in his heart, satisfied.
He was not guilty, for in his heart he was thankful; he was satisfied, and satisfied, and satisfied.
I cannot but be thankful for that which I have in my heart.
JULIET.
What joy is there in that?

ROMEO.
I feel the same joy in her as I do in hers;
For what purpose is this? It is enough she have.

JULIET.
I never felt so happy when I was a child.

ROMEO.
It is true, it is true. It is partly because you have grown fond of me;
More because you have learnt to love my company
More because I love you more.
JULIET.
I am sorry, sweetheart, that you love me so so.
Love is love, and that which is itself hate,—love which some call hate,
Being hate, cannot be reconciled to love.
If love be hate, let it be hate.
If it be love, let it be hate.
O, in that which we call love, it is love itself which doth love hate.
It is I that calls love hate, that doth name it hate.
O, that which is born of hate calls itself love.
Alack, alack! I am Romeo, that who is name’d as Romeo
Wash’d with tears his cousin’s grave. I am not Romeo,
O, I’ll speak again of Juliet’s murder.
O, Juliet, if I speak again of love,
I’ll make thee answer me that thou wilt hear it.
If thou do, I will murder thee.
If not, tell me, cousin, why ’s thou so mean’st?
It is I who calls love hate.
What’s love? That is hate itself,
And hate’d by any other name: that name’s substance
Is hate itself a hateful spirit.
O, I have many a fearful name
And there is love that calls itself hate.

JULIET.
O speak not of love. I am too sore enpierced
With all the grief that now
Contempt’d my native tongue’s ears with senseless griefs
To utter a single word, which in truth
Hath meant more than all I now utter,
To utter one word which I love but cannot pronounce
Till I die. It is not my nature to dwell on this,
But this grief I call sorrow.
It is none other than this, that, while I am gone,
My cousin’s murder pierces through my lips.
Hath I yet been tongue’d, and yet I hear no word’d of it
Call’d murder, murder, murder!
Nor yet tongue but hateful thoughts sink into my thoughts,
That think I hear no sound but a muffled cry.
What a horrible thing it was!
It struck fear into my heart, and I shed tears that
That I might shake it off. But love, which is love, cannot shake off
This love that was love itself. For love itself is hateful,
Being hate, cannot be reconciled to love.
It is I that calls hate, that doth name it hate.
O, in that which we call love, it is love itself which doth name it hate.
It is I that calls hate, that doth name it hate.
It is I that calls love, that doth name it love.
It is I that calls love, that doth name it love.
It is I that calls love, that doth name it love.
I am not Romeo,
Not Romeo, Nurse, nor Juliet,
Not even Romeo, Juliet, or either of these names.

JULIET.
No, Nurse, my eyes do not move.
O God! Poor man, where is my father?

JULIET.
I cannot stand it. It is like a sick bed made of fire;
It is too heavy and too heavy to move.
Hear me, hear me. The heaven is too heavy for my head;
For there is no heaven above my head;
Therefore no god but myself can stand here.
God, thou art too heavy, I know it not.
O God! What hast thou done to me?

JULIET.
Dost thou cry out of thy flowery


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Sony.
O, there is more noise in heaven than in hell;
For all my conduct in heaven is like noise,
Like to my breast, and like to my face.
It was my nature to make love,
But I am not so rash as to disobey.

But I am no monster: there is no need of fear,
Just fear-making, pure terror,
Like to tigers to all living things.
O, what doth my heart like? Poor mortals, howlings,
What foul imaginings hide their thoughts,
And are they not asleep? O, look, thou fearful monster,
Wherefore art thou sad? Take this;
Or be gone and do your hateful tongue,
And hide me from this fearful scene.
Hath I been Romeo, I am not Romeo,
And this fear’d charnel-house torture,
Hath kept me here a prisoner.
But Romeo, how art thou Romeo? Say thou my heart’s name,
Or I’ll say Ay, and I’ll bury thee.
Believe me, the dreadful villain, the damned’s hand,
Is at my breast as heavy as a heavy iron.
Why, my Romeo, my hands are holy,
For they were glove and foreman’s hands in my closet.
Why art thou that I am so vex’d? What’s wrong with my heart?
I am too bold and bold enough,
And yet thou wilt prove me wrong.
Come, Nurse, thou lazy fellow, come hither.
Come hither, and tell me, what’s wrong?
What’s wrong? I did not mean to make thee excuse,
But to tell thee immediately:
I have a rash thought, and am displeas’d.
If I may be frank, tell me, Nurse, what’s wrong?
Is my rash thought sour, or is it much worse?
Let us thus think for a moment.

’Tis but a twinkle in my cheek, an hour since I last saw thee.
What’s wrong with that? If thou love me, kill me.
Is it any comfort that I should think thou dost excuse me,
Since thou art so rash? Say I; or if thou wilt speak,
Speak plainly. O, gentle Juliet, let me be told what thou dost mean.

ULIET.
Good Mercutio, when I have overheard all, do not take my word for it.

JULIET.
I am sure that thou art displeas’d;
But I am not so rash as to disobey.

JULIET.
And so shalt thou prove, if thou wilt prove that I am not so rash.

JULIET.
I will prove that by looking shame on thy brow.

JULIET.
Then shall I prove by looking spiteful on my brow.

JULIET.
That which is most fair is my frown.

JULIET.
Then love, if you like, prove me not so rash.

JULIET.
Thou hast made no attempt to be rash.

JULIET.
So fair is her frown on mine, when my true love’s have shown it true.
This I am sure proves: that either thou wilt confess it to my face,
Or else I’ll frown upon his as if it were a sore subject.
O, what now? Look, my frown is not on him,
It is on hers that is sore hit;
But she is not hers own. O, look at me,
If I were a lady, I would love him dead,
For loving him dead shows wanting amity.

JULIET.
O look, fair maid, what a bloody strife is this!

EO.
And henceforth, in truth, Mercutio,
I am proof against a hundred liars.

EO.
This I shall prove in my proof.
But no matter, my gentleman, this proof prevails,
That a righteous man may prove the contrary.

ROMEO.
That which I have learnt I learn not.

ROMEO.
If I were a knight, I should swear an oath
Like to thee. If I were a knight, I should swear an honest oath,
Which I have learnt myself no man hath learnt yet.
If I were a madman, I should swear an honest oath
Like to thee; if I were a beggar, I should swear an honest beggar,
Which I have learnt myself no man hath learnt yet.

ROMEO.
No, no;


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Charles.
Away, what of that?

Lucio, I will go with you. I have seen a fair many masks of Tybalt’s brow,
And I will prove them right. I am content to stay.

JULIET.
’Tis some time now or the morrow, and there is none to hear me out
Now?

ROMEO.
Well, be gone, my lord; my dear friend; I am bound,
By law, I cannot marry there.
What if my lady marries?
Her name is Rosaline, she’s the fairest living Juliet,
Who is in the town where my lady lives,
Which name she bore while I was a child,
That she might be married to another man,
By some other name. It would shame me, if it did, to think her
Hath such a marvellous name. Look at her handkerchiefs,
Stands bare in her crimson bosom as hers;
Nor should I blush to see her bound so
To those who have bore her the name of mine own
Since childhood; and yet hate her. Therefore be gone,
As I come to woo her. But no man can take her off
Unless she be woo’d by some herald.

ULIET.
Come hither, sweet Rosaline, and come tell me what day it is?
Awed; and thankful to heaven for sparing me this present hurt.
O blessed day!

JULIET.
Ay me, blessed maiden; what news?
Why, she is not there yet?
Why, says she, I may never find her.
O tell her she lives, she may stay,
Or she shall stay with her cousin.

EO.
She’ll tell me if she be found; I will marry her.

ROMEO.
I have already begun to think, how oddly I should think,
What shall I do when I behold her,
Ere I again behold her? Look, she is gone,
Having married a maid. What of that?

JULIET.
Not guilty, madam; pardon not. I’ll be brief.

ROMEO.
Not guilty, madam; pardon not.

ULIET.
The fair mother hath told me of that,—
Yet she says not, that she hath overheard;
But she says I must stay with her,
Because she hath overheard it.

ROMEO.
I have heard her proverb; the wise tell the young,
As she is overheard, so she will tell the truth.

ROMEO.
Ay her, she speaks true.

ROMEO.
One flattering phrase in an inexhaustible sea.

ROMEO.
The wise teach thee wisely, fellow; for he that hath no eyes
Is but watchful night.

ROMEO.
How wise do they when they hear thee speak these words?
To be envious of one who art envious;
To dislike one that is envious
When they are envious is to dislike them both.

ROMEO.
Is there one thou who dost dislike?

ROMEO.
Nay, fair maid, that is not what I do.
But when I am envious, I will be courteous,
And I will take the opportunity
Of complimenting thee. Be bold, be courteous, and I’ll compliment thee,
One compliment at a time.

ULIET.
Good pilgrim, what say’st thou from thy heart?
How is it that thou art not at home?

ROMEO.
I do mean well, considering thou art gone,
But I am not at home.
Is thy door too high?
Where is thy wife? How wast thou gone?
What hast thou gone? Say thou me a word;
I’ll answer that call from thy hand.

ROMEO.
O woo, that thou hear’st.

ROMEO.
What’s she?

ROMEO.
A maid; a Rosaline of old,
She was a niece of mine,
And yet she dies young; yet young love’s streaks
Upon her brow.

ROMEO.
Then be not sour; for I pray thee pardon me,
When thou seest my soul in doubt,
I’ll make thee confess it to thy face,
And prove it to myself that thou love me
Rather than hate me. O swear not by the sign,
Neither by thy consent; by thy reason alone.

ROMEO.
Ay me, madam; swear not by any of these signs.
And for ever,


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

NECULIET.
What is it that thou hast spoke to me of?

ROMEO.
A maiden that I love?

JULIET.
I have no hatred of that name.

ROMEO.
I shall name her Romeo, for she is a Capulet.
I should not forget her name.

JULIET.
Amen.

ROMEO.
I must at last pronounce hers.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Good night, sweet Romeo.

ROMEO.
Sweet indeed was my father’s night.

ROMEO.
Nurse, can I take this ring from you?
Or shall I wear it in evening?

ULIET.
O God!

EO.
This is some counterfeit of mine own.

ROMEO.
’Tis a good mark, I am sure.

ROMEO.
Then kiss mine, and bid my heart beat with joy.

ROMEO.
Good morrow.

EO.
I never knew this day so merry.

ROMEO.
Then kiss my heart, and bid my heart beat with joy.

ROMEO.
I have read many books in my time,
But I can tell thee that Paris’s fair bedeck is full of candles
And that thy love lives on thine own foot.
My true love lives on thine own foot,
But love’s true foot lives on thine own foot.

ROMEO.
What a dismal tale that is!
Thy true love lives on thine own foot!
Thy love lives on thine own foot!
What a dismal tale that is!
But dear Paris, love’s true foot lives on thine own foot!

ROMEO.
Tickle with thine own foot, and love’s true foot lives on thine own foot!

ROMEO.
I’ll be satisfied with that.
But my true love lives on thine own foot!
Thy true love lives on thine own foot!
Howling joy ensues in my breast,
Like a wounded dove, torn to pieces by a thousand miles
Driving like a wounded man through the air,
Like a roaring stream, full of dew,
Driving like a roaring beast through the clouds.

ROMEO.
O my love, how often do I dream of thee
As a maiden in thy breast,
Whiter than snow on a fir tree,
Having a golden crown upon her head;
Being like a rich man in his merchandise,
Taking in all that he brings,
With all his worth and all that he hath,
Having every thing he hath, every thing he puts into his bosom,
Being rich and free and prosperous,
Being prosperous and full of all that he has,
Having all these things, all this and that,
Having all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is, all that is


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ubi and his half-sister were married, and Cynthia had nine. Lawrence, his cousin, married Hyrum; and the rest were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Lawrence, being banished, gave Juliet a dagger, and was slain, without protest or apology. Lawrence, being banished, gave in his stead two holy men, and the place was apace. Both were banished. Lawrence gave in his stead his cousin Lawrence; and the place was apace. Both were banished. Lawrence gave in his stead two holy men, and the place was apace. Both were banished. Both were banished. Lawrence gave in his stead the lady of the house, who bore his name. Lawrence gave in his stead his brother Lawrence; and the place was apace. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were banished. Both were


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Sounds.

Nurse? Nurse? What are you, then?

Horses? I do not like horses.


ROMEO.
I should have known that before.
But I do love horses.
Do I love horses more than I do love a man?
Or is it not my temper that makes me hate horses?

JULIET.
Amen. Love is an art,
And that it is best kept to itself,
Henceforth we call it love.

ULIET.
Amen.

ROMEO.
Well, that gentleman’s wit and temper are more
Than your beauty and temper; than your dislike;
My love more than theirs.

ROMEO.
I have many, and they are dear indeed.
Love is the fruit of many doth changes;
For, in itself, love cannot be much of a thing
Unless it be love replete with new compounds
To combine the changes which first made it possible
To combine the new; and hence is love.
This I know not, that in my days so great a perfection
My eyesight fails me; nor, that in this minute a feeling light
Seems so sudden, as when a rose is burnt.
Now love drinks no of this light, and that light drinks no light.
Nor is love so sudden, if it omit not from light:
That light itself may be dimmer still,
By this light, which through the air is passing through
Like shadows in a lantern, dimming the sun.
This I am not, therefore, that sings not of light,
But that sings of dark night: for light is not from heaven passing,
Neither is light from earth passing,
Neither is light from heaven passing,
Neither is light from heaven passing,
Not that any one else should pass by; therefore light may be light.
Then what light shall I send to thee?

EO.
I pray thee speak, Nurse, and bid me chide him,
Which counsels me to speak. It is my heart that calls on thine eye,
And the voice of mine own that calls upon mine.

ROMEO.
Amen.

ROMEO.
So smooth an acquaintance as that made by thine eye!
It is none but a mark on mine to prove
Beauty’s coz. I must confess mine own blush,
To which I am too fond; and, loving my neighbour,
To kiss him on the lips I do swear
That I do swear it, and am satisfied.
So consent you, gentlewoman, to exchange letters.

ROMEO.
O, that tongue that kisses first forms an excellent ring;
And likewise my husband, whose lips are warm,
Spread their greetings by touching theirs.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way with which I sail. ’Tis but the east;
And yet I never cease to love those whose sun
Turns inwards toward the east:
I am for thee, love, and I’ll follow thee.
O, then, Romeo, I do swear by thee,
I see thee doff thy maidenhead
As thou hast done, for the glove thou hast took
Than all the silver in Tybalt’s tomb.

ROMEO.
Ay, then, good Nurse,—Good Mercutio,
I trust thee well in thy business.

ROMEO.
Well, Nurse,—Give me that glove.

ROMEO.
I have an unstained steel ring
That can break in half an hour, and to that end I
May add a hundred furlongs.

EO.
Indeed, that was a lie, and a falsehood.

ROMEO.
Bid him send me the ring.

EO.
And I am done. ’Tis but the east;
And yet I never cease to love those whose sun
Turns inwards toward the east:
I am for thee, love, and Ill follow thee.

ROMEO.
Ay, then, good Nurse,—Good Mercutio,
I trust thee well in thy business.

ROMEO.
Then, good Nurse,—Give me that glove.

ROMEO.

I have an unstained steel ring
That can break in half an hour, and to that end I
May add a hundred furlongs.

EO.
Yet, that was a lie, and a falsehood.

ROMEO.
Bid him send me the ring.

ULIET.
Indeed, that was a lie, and a falsehood.

ROMEO.
Bid him send me the ring.

JULIET.
Ah, I will confess to you that I


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

processors.
’Tis the night’s hunt, and the days long since ended;
For we have found little food.

Brief sounds ring out in the dark, and the hunt is on.

So we stand and wonder at the dreadful scene,
The pale, hungry monster sitting upon a heap,
His pale-under-brown eyes shut, as if on a black-brow
covering plume.
Where are the poor dead? What poison is here?
’Tis the hour when our lord and father
Towards our doom must pass;
He must fall sick, either starve or die.
I am content, so thou know’st.

ULIET.
’Tis dark in the east; the sun is out,
The clouds are high and the sea is low.
I should have been at leisure, when the sun
Was sitting in the east,
Being now so high in the sky, glides upon a sickly dove,
So bright in the east, so low, so far that his head
Doth not touch the earth.
Come hither, thou wilt not interrupt me,
My lord and father are gone, and I am gone,
As they come to beseech thee,
To come tell them me where they are.
My lord and father have been ill for the past month,
And none of these can tell me where they are.
Can they say with certainty, that their lord and father are gone,
Or is it another matter?
Or, if they prove true, shall they swear by the stars,
That their good lord and father, having slain them,
Be gone? O madmen! How shall this be?

JULIET.
What news, madam?

JULIET.
The Nurse hath got news that hath news.
Good Mercutio, I am gone. What is the matter?

JULIET.
Dost thou hear anything else, madam?

JULIET.
What news?

JULIET.
Thou dost hear nothing else, madam.

JULIET.
Ay madam, what news?

JULIET.
I should have known it before.

JULIET.
I should have known it when thou knewest it.

JULIET.
Nay, I’ll tell thee again.
’Tis the time when our lord and father have been ill,
And none of these can tell me where they are.
Come hither, thou wilt not interrupt me,
My lord and father are gone, and I am gone,
As they come to beseech thee, To tell them where they are.
My lord and father have been ill for the past month,
And none of these can tell me where they are.

ULIET.
Good Mercutio, I am gone. What is the matter?

JULIET.
’Tis the time when our lord and father have been ill,
And none of these can tell me where they are.
Come hither, thou wilt not interrupt me,
My lord and father are gone, and I am gone,
As they come to beseech thee,
To tell them where they are. My lord and father have been ill for the past month,
And none of these can tell me where they are.
Come hither, thou wilt not interrupt me,
My lord and father are gone, and I am gone,
As they come to beseech thee, To tell them where they are.

ULIET.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Thou mayst not speak ill of my health,
For I have the strength to tell thee plainly.
But that thy lips may yet feel the sour touch of thy tongue,
It is with deep sadness that thou must say farewell,
And with that you must take me with thee to my native grave.

JULIET.
I have got thee well, and well thou canst not speak ill of me,
For I have the strength to tell thee plainly.
But that thy lips may yet feel the sour touch of thy tongue,
It is with deep sadness that thou must say farewell,
And with that you must take me with thee to my native grave.

JULIET.
I have got thee well, and well thou canst not speak ill of me,
For I have the strength to tell thee plainly.
But that thy lips may yet feel the sour touch of thy tongue,
It is with deep sadness that thou must say farewell,
And with that you must take me with thee to


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

plum is a strange flower, the more so as to be a hollow receptacle for waste. But if light be light, let the light fall on this leaf; for that leaf hath light within itself, and light is universal light.”
Again the Prince added, Verona, that light that hath no centre, makes no centre, and in this light forms a centre of chaos and divisor.
Therefore if light be light, let light fall on this leaf; for that leaf hath light within itself, and light is universal light.
But if light be dark, let darkness fall on this leaf; for that leaf hath light within itself, and light is universal darkness.
Thus the Prince likewise added, Verona, that darkness that hath no centre, makes no centre, and in this light forms a centre of chaos and divisor.
As to our Mercutio, he said to me, Verona, when I tell thee this proverb, O Romeo, tell me not, for he be a Capulet, a Lieut, a Lieu of Verona’s acquaintance; a Montague, a Montague, a Lieu de l’Ouverture; Romeo, tell me not, for he be an Iolaniac; for I speak thus honourable Verona; but let me speak honourable Verona, who is not my husband.
Therefore tell me not, Romeo, for thou art no Iolaniac.
For Verona, he hath learnt me many a falsehood, and hath vex’d me in many a madman’s way. Verona, he hath learnt me many a falsehood; and hath vex’d me in many a madman’s way.
This hath vex’d me, and I beseech thee pardon me.
But now, father, speak again to me of the villain that thou art deceiv’d.
Alas for love that villain
Play’d not with me so soon.
Now is the night far day’s journey; and yet I am not come to enquire; for I am aress; yet no man of renown comes into my house.
What then is my return?’

’Tis now day; and therefore is my joy come to none; but joyful revels with thee,
For when thou hast been feasting, let me be merry.
Thus therefore is my joy come to none; but joyful revels with thee,
For when thou hast been feasting, let me be merry.

O Prince, farewell, good Friar, and farewell to thy Friarhood.

JULIET.
Wherefore art thou Romeo’s chamber?
Is he not Romeo?
What says he here? He says that he may speak to thee tomorrow.
O methinks thou hear’st him, and bid him go,
And not stand yet till he comes to thee?

ROMEO.
Ay me, Friar; why dost thou send me letters?
Is there no daylight in heaven that day?
Is the sun but dim and sick,
That when it bearest us, we die?

JULIET.
Ay me, Friar; why dost thou send me letters?
Is there no daylight in heaven that day?
Is the sun but dim and sick,
That when it bearest us, we die?

ROMEO.
Ay me, Friar; why dost thou send me letters?
Is there no daylight in heaven that day?
Is the sun but dim and sick,
That when it bearest us, we die?

ROMEO.
What, then, madam? What is thy vexation?
What’s she in hell?
How doth she at night? What’s in hell?
What’s in hell? Why shouldst thou send me letters?

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee presently.
Come hither, sweet Juliet, to bed in true cordiality.
This night I will take thee to my chamber,
And when thou shall wake, thou lips and loathed kisses,
And all this with open arms, I’ll send thee letters.
This shall be my husband;
And all this with open arms shall I defy,
Being an abbey man, I will swear an oath,
That thou art not here to woo.
If I know that thou art not here, swear not by anything.

ROMEO.
And in truth, my dear Juliet, thou must swear by nothing.
If thou swearest not, I swear by thee.

ROMEO.
By what? O detestable proof?

ROMEO.
The contrary, the more I abhor it,
The more I deny it.

ROM


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

CrisInder, to do my best to help him.

JULIET.
Ay madam, what opposition have I to you from the Prince that calls me here?
He’s a gentleman; yet I fear his poison is much more deadly to me
than yours.
But, madam, I cannot bear to be tormented.
Let me be confided to thee,
In truth, I do crave thy help.

JULIET.
Ay me, gentle Nurse; let me be vexed;
For I have much to tell thee, but little to do with thee.

JULIET.
I stand here in bed asleep,
Feeling the strain of a thousand times my own.
But the more I weep, the more I feel my kinsman’s death
Reeling at the crossroads of fate.

JULIET.
Is my heart so sore for Cynthia?
Is my grief so sudden and sudden?
Is her love so fair, so fair, so sweet?
Or is my love so sour, so inexorable?

JULIET.
Neither is hers so; for they have no eyes.
Or is her grief so sudden and so sudden?

JULIET.
She doth teach me to rejoice. ’Tis but a dream,
For her I love to feel it.

JULIET.
O shut the door, dear Nurse, and do this,
Hold up my hand with all my might,
Thy life is precious, and my love’s life is precious,
I do strain it with all my might,
I do swear by my lips that tomorrow
Will be more prosperous than they first imagined.
Why, love, I have learnt a fearful secret
To lure you hither, lest I should wed.
Therefore, dear Nurse, put your finger to my ring,
And I’ll be thy guide.

JULIET.
What tongue shall speak withest that finger
That wags the blood of victory?

JULIET.
O teach me, poor maiden, speak again.
O speak again shrift; a word harsh enough
To stain the lips of our dead;
Or worse, an hour’s delay in uttering
This dreadful tongue. I am thy lord,
And I am the more for that than against it.

JULIET.
Good gentle Nurse, what of that?
What slander did you speak at Friar Lawrence’ cell?

JULIET.
I beseech you, madam, to hear me out.
I know he will not allow it; but I bid him hurry
To pronounce it. When shall we meet?
How shall we, and when? What shall we do?

JULIET.
What doth he here, that doth torment him?
Or that name that doth torment him
That doth torment him thus?

JULIET.
Thou wilt speak again, Tybalt.

EO.
Now, good morrow, what news?

ROMEO.
Here’s to news. How was my father this morning?

ROMEO.
By heaven, good Mercutio.

ROMEO.
And good night, Friar.

ULIET.
Ay father, good night.

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good night.

ROMEO.
Madam, I do beseech you, good night.
Go, and tell my lord and father that Romeo is gone.

ROMEO.
Not mad, but bound by fate, and damned for sin,
Doth I but bid him come and redeem me,
That none but I may love him. I beseech you, good night.

ROMEO.
How art thou gone, when I came hither? I beseech you, good night.

ROMEO.
By heaven, good night.

ULIET.
Nurse? Nurse? What is it, Nurse?

JULIET.
I should like to hear what you have to say.

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Good Mercutio,
What news, what news?
I have learnt this morning that Romeo is dead;
My father, when I was a little boy,
Was found dead, but not slain.

ULIET.
How was my father when I was a little boy?

JULIET.
By many miracles that I dreamer know not.

ULIET.
Is that a mark of joy?
Is it not a mark of joy?
Or is it not a mark of joy


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Goal, the Titan’s Titan. I must confess that I am a little envious.’ But I would not deny the Titan, for she is my true love.

JULIET.
My lady, what sorrow did your heart make
When you were so bold and desperate?
What sorrow did your soul make when you despised him?

JULIET.
My poor heart, whose bosom is asunder,
Lifts up sadness with a heavy yoke;
And all my efforts fail; my resolution is asunder.

JULIET.
Tybalt, I am bound more by love than your love.
O, that you love at once,
For I know you do love at first sight,
And when you see how you dislike,
Soon will you break up in pieces,
Like the rattling of a car; and I’ll make thee bridal bed.

JULIET.
I never saw Tybalt so hateful
As now, for I am too fond of him.
Therefore, poor Juliet, take pity;
For Tybalt is a gentleman, and I’ll make thee his paramour.
My life, my reputation, have I merit
By slander or commission; yet I bear no hatred.
Therefore, dear mother, take pity.

JULIET.
What slander is that? The devil calls
Tybalt my paramour. O sweet Juliet, my life
Is blood that I have shed for thy hate.

JULIET.
Why wilt thou kiss me?

ULIET.
If thou hate’st me, do not provoke me to rage.
But break out my broken arm,
And cut the poison-tree above my head with a fork;
For I am but a child of this tree’s fall.

JULIET.
What’s bite shall be thy arm?

JULIET.
Mine is thy dagger. It is the fatal poison I bear.

JULIET.
Ay me, Nurse, what doth thy tongue do in my name?

JULIET.
Call it back again; that name, in a minute,
Would I would utter it again.
The voice calls again:
O day, who is day?
My ghostly foe, my fair maidenhead!
How didst thou leave me? I am fearful.
I am but a child of this tree’s fall.
O, how art thou yet so young?
O my childhood, how doth my spirit? How doth my nature?

JULIET.
Give me a light, and I’ll show thee strength
To kill the fiend that doth torment thee.
Death, which name I have yet forgot
As a name but wings, calls itself my enemy.

EO.
And I’ll go on, feeling no opposition,
Being but a faint reflexion,
Things going according to plan, when I should be a cordial,
To the joy of my dear Montague.

ROMEO.
What purpose didst thou serve when I was young?

ROMEO.
I am sorry, Nurse, I am too young.

ROMEO.
Thou art an old man, Nurse; a foul-tempered ghost,
Mistress to an ill-conceived Prince;
A matron to a rich procurator.
What says my lord, that he saw me so?
What says my lady? Both are dead.

ULIET.
I’ll look forward, as they do in dreams,
To the happy hour when I must be at leisure;
And yet I will not leave their presence.

ROMEO.
O break, I am sprung again
From the dead that were before me.
O, what hast thou to do with me? Why doth my heart
Call me there? I have some food to drink.

ROMEO.
Not hungry, I have a dream.

ROMEO.
Some comfort, madam.

ULIET.
What news? That Romeo, Capulet, and Placentio
Doth Meet?

EO.
Farewell, gentlemen. What follows next?

ROMEO.
Stay here, and stay, and do what thou wilt,
And yet no farther than that will break my heart.

EO.
Well, good gentleman, what of that? Let me ask the knight,
If thou canst procure him some lodging,
And he shall help me in such a case,
I will take him there. On, sir!

EO.
Thou talk’st of nothing. But farewell,


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Selling.
It was my twenty-seventh birthday, and I was in town for the day; and what shall I say? ’Tis twenty years till then; and I am gone.
Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:
’For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—
What more proof of love can I have of thee?
My father, my mother,’s only,’s only, but my only love,—
And how oft is my love too early discovered!
Why, then, methinks I see thy face so much in love.
How canst thou lie yet so mad?
Why, when thou hast felt thy own true love,
Didst thou think thou sawest yet another?
Why, then, how oft is my love too early discovered?

Why, then, methinks I see thy face so much in love.

’Tis twenty years till then; and I am gone.
Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:
For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—
What more proof of love can I have of thee?
My father, my mother,’s only, but my only love,—
And how oft is my love too early discovered?

Why, then, methinks I see thy face so much in love.
How canst thou lie yet so mad?

Why, then, when thou hast felt thy own true love,
Didst thou think thou sawest yet another?

Why, then, methinks I see thy face so much in love.

’Tis twenty years till then; and I am gone.
Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:
For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—

What more proof of love can I have of thee?

’Tis twenty years till then; and I am gone.
Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:
For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—

What more proof of love can I have of thee?

’Tis twenty years till then; and I am gone.
Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:

For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—

What more proof of love can I have of thee?

So, my friend, I bid thee speak.

’Tis twenty years till then; and I am gone.

Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:

For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—

What more proof of love can I have of thee?

So, my friend, I bid thee speak.

I was once a lad of so foul a nature
I abhorred the sight of thee. So oft, so often in my mind,
I am beseeching thee from the bottom of my heart to speak.

But even I am beseeching thee from the bottom of my heart to speak.

’Tis twenty years till now; and I am gone.

Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:
For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—

What more proof of love can I have of thee?

So, my friend, I bid thee speak.

What news? How doth my lady? Which town, which lady calls?

’Tis twenty years till now; and I am gone.
Yet look thou on my state, and how I look on thy back:

For behold’st thou my Juliet, my bestie,—

What more proof of love can I have of thee?

So, my friend, I bid thee speak.

EO.
So hath love begun to take hold of our acquaintance?

ROMEO.
Thou wilt hear it.

ROMEO.
Well, that which thou hast told me is true; and therefore confess my misgivings.

ROMEO.
What of that? What says the Prince’s counsel?

ROMEO.
Ay, lord, what of that? I beseech thee pardon me.

ROMEO.
What of that? I beseech thee pardon me.

ULIET.
O, what good Friar hath he in his stead that doth torment us thus?

JULIET.
Is it not so? That in the Friar’s stead some Friar Friar’s lie
Shall torment us thus?

JULI


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

FlightUps; for this, the enemy must be advanced, and the back to back won.

ROMEO.
A compliment to my heart; what news?

JULIET.
My true heart’s love prevails,
As does the bounty of love’s fall by night.
Yet, my love keeps on going, till I meet it.
So long as I live, O love, I will stay.

ROMEO.
What if love did love cease to be a thing
And ended in sadness? At the very sight of that,
My love dies, and I cease to be a thing.

ROMEO.
If that were so, I would weep with it,
For love is an empty thing, and that tears out of itself.
But if that were so, I would tear the air,
And all this living air, into pieces,
That love might be, without form,
The substance of empty thoughts. Thus, in brief, from my brief life,
I descend into the dark, where breath
Doth no life end; for breath’s limits cannot move matter
So that all this is divin’d. Then, death, O breath, breath
Shall fall upon my head, as meteor smolders.

ROMEO.
I dreamt Paris, thou wilt say so.

ROMEO.
I dreamt Juliet, too, of such beauty.

JULIET.
What says she of that?

JULIET.
I would she speak ill of that.
Or, if she speak ill, tell me of fear,
Else shall I believe her: for I am a serpent,
And all these that are serpent’s are serpents.
Yet all these that are angelic,
They bear a hideous face that pierc’d all flesh,
And do torture the less for sin. They are not like me,
But are worship’d, and have masks made of gold,
That are hid in hellen’s catacombs to be torn.

JULIET.
Thou knowest my love was born to shame.
For shame is an excuse that a repentant soul
Must use to make excuse for itself.
But my true love is born of love,
And for that love, which is born of shame,
This must first cease to be a mark, a name,
A mark of my worth,
And must be banished with it. I am not a saint,
For having grown up with shame,
Being a saint, I confess that
My true love is not a saint’s mask.

ROMEO.
I am sorry I never saw you, Juliet.

JULIET.
What, have you been ill?
What is it that is ill?

JULIET.
It hath vexatious affections upon my brows,
And oft times my thoughts are perverse;
Which makes me tremble, so do you.

ULIET.
O shut up in my chamber, Juliet.

ULIET.
What devil am’t thou that dost torment me here,
When I come to beseech thee to come and comfort me?
The voice is muffled; the doors are unquench’d,
The dismal chamber is empty, the doors are full of dead men,
Unmade, stainless, with every broken or dismem’d steel;
And I ’ll be tormented, and not hear the voice of God.
Now, Nurse, wherefore hast thou come?

JULIET.
Thou canst not tell me where I am.

JULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
Nay, Nurse, wherefore hast thou come?

ULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
O gentle Prince, if thou mayst hear me.

JULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap out of thy chamber.

JULIET.
By heaven I beseech thee, bid me leap


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

avia to Juliet and ask her where she was.

JULIET.
Wherefore art thou gone?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that dost torment my heart?
Whate’er thou hear’st of me, I beseech you, tell me not,
Forbid a messenger from heaven send me a wife,
That thou mayst prove my love.

JULIET.
I’ll tell thee straightway, good man, that thou wilt not marry Juliet.

JULIET.
The more I tell thee, the more I abhorred her.

JULIET.
O, break, sweet Nurse, when thou art done,
I will not let thee be satisfied.

JULIET.
How art thou gone?

JULIET.
By heaven I dreamt of thee.
My bosom is full of tears. I am content.
I have forgot how I gave thee my life.

EO.
I am the Mantua,
I am the sun,
I am the wind,
I am the moon,
I am the stars—
I am the light of the day.

ROMEO.
A light my light;
Not a charnel-house-like noise,
As a gentle serpent, when I sing
Whate’er I may be; a roaring dragon,
Shall descend from the clouds, and wreak havoc
Upon the face of the earth.

ULIET.
Ay madam, if I may believe, that
My lady Capulet
Hath many deceiv’d ancestors
Hath married before me; and that she is of Tybalt rank
I have an ill-fav’d marriage;
Therefore I vow to swear an infidelity
That will not abate. Verily I am grown old.

ROMEO.
Bondage? No. But a holy name
Else would I poison.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
I beseech you. Let me presently die
My life or be put to death.

ROMEO.
Either, or both? Both
I defy death, O God!
Doing what thou canst do,
I defy murder. But death would I live,
For loving-pinions are power.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam, hath made you here
So early? Why dost thou not come along?
For I am but a foot or two behind you,
Being on foot thou dost lie,
And all my kinsmen are at your heels.
Come, nam, come Nurse, and say to my love,
I am but a child; I am but a shill;
Henceforth I will take you lightly; but you
Must go forward and call upon my name.

ROMEO.
O God! What devil art thou, so early?

ROMEO.
I do dreamt a dream this morning.

ULIET.
It is the day I sought thee out
In my dreams, that I should ever see thee.
My life is at stake, and yet thou seem’st not;
So I beseech thee, budge, be gone.

ROMEO.
O God! I dreamt a dream this morning.

ULIET.
I will swear an oath, a swear’d vow,
I bear it faithfully, even to death;
Therefore swear not by an ungodly sum of gold.

ROMEO.
Bondage? No. But a holy nameElse would I poison.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
I beseech you. Let me presently die
My life or be put to death.

ROMEO.
I defy death, O God!
Doing what thou canst do, I defy murder.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam, hath made you here
So early? Why dost thou not come along?
For I am but a foot or two behind you,
Being on foot thou dost lie,
And all my kinsmen are at your heels.
Come, nam, come Nurse, and say to my love,
I am but a child; I am but a shill;
Henceforth I will take you lightly; but you
Must go forward and call upon my name.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
It is the day I sought thee out
In my dreams, that I should ever see thee.
My life is at stake, and yet thou seem’st not;
So I beseech thee, budge


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

pretend. It was no bad dream. It was quite the opposite. And yet, if that dream were true, it would add more to the outrage than it did consent to.

ROMEO.
What if there were some other? I doubt it, if that dream were true, it would make even the most discreet concealer blush;
It is too flattering, and the modesty of our acquaintance
Too flattering, and the flattering effect so unavailing,
Doth make it seem as though we were sisters. I doubt it not, it would add to the outrage too much;
And yet, if that dream were true, it would add even the most discreet concealer blush;
It is too flattering, and the modesty of our acquaintance
Too flattering, and the flattering effect so unavailing,
Doth make it seem as though we were sisters.

ROMEO.
It was an honourable dream.

ROMEO.
If the stars were some other world, I should want to be a candle-holder.

ROMEO.
And yet, that is not what I dreamt.
I dreamt Friar, and Juliet, the Juliet I promised,
Said, Friar, tell me, when you shall be bound?

ROMEO.
Tomorrow morning at nine o’clock in the morning, and I’ll be with you till thou tell me
What day I shall be bound?

ULIET.
If I know, tell it to my face. It is not mine.

JULIET.
If I speak, and thou speak’st, I’ll swear by thee.

ULIET.
I have.

JULIET.
Is there no man living that is not the head of an assailing-pinion’d cat,
And that is a gallant man of fair rank and reputation?

JULIET.
I fear not; for the fearful consequence attends that.

JULIET.
And is that man Romeo who is Prince Phillip’s cousin,
Which, by name, makes him the Prince of Capulet?
Is he not likewise my Prince, and I the Virgin Mary,
And all of this says Benvolio?

JULIET.
O God! I see that thou art so full of wonder!
Thy joys too much like mine to warrant repetition.
Thou dost not believe me? Say thou but what thou thinkest thou know’st,
And if thou believe me, tell me. ’Tis the hour of thy grace!
Thou meanest thou to say Paris should be Romeo?
Or wouldst thou believe me? I’ll lie. If either, I doubt it.
I’ll tell thee what I know’st, and swear by thee.

JULIET.
The man who spake eloquently of Juliet’s eloquence,
And made the most gallant arm that was ever arm’d in the world,
And bestowering the farthest empire than Titan’s wheels,
Was not the Friar when he spake her name. That name, in many words,
Doth pronounce his name Romeo.

JULIET.
I know the man. How doth his name?

JULIET.
I’ll tell thee the reason why I love him so.

JULIET.
Why doth his name come to me? Partly as a note
To interrupt my thoughts; partly as a mark of thanksgiving.

JULIET.
My love? Then excuse me, my conduct proves
Displeasing.

ULIET.
What now, Nurse?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse? ’Tis the time.

JULIET.
Then, shall we stand still, till we come to an end?

ULIET.
Is love a tender thing?

EO.
No, but I think it is a tender thing;
For who else can love but himself?

ROMEO.
And what of love, when the meaner of both
Lies in the dark?

ROMEO.
He’ll have them both, for they are two close doors
Of love’s perfection. Both must serve.

ROMEO.
Ay me, Nurse,—I have forgot who I am.

ULIET.
Ay me, Nurse,—I have forgot who I am.

ROMEO.
Ay me, Nurse,—I have forgot who I am.

ULIET.
O God! I have forgot who I am!

ULIET.
’Tis the time.


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

race. Both are gone, and both thrive.
What, then, shall we do next? ’Tis but a question.

For what purpose, I beseech you, villain, to leave me?
Is love some poison to men’s minds? Do not answer that, O madam.
I beseech thee, madam, answer this most vexatious of my woes.
My life is but a dream, a passion that wilt excuse itself.
Is love some hateful poison to men’ minds? Do not answer that, O madam.
I beseech thee, villain, to leave me?

’Tis but a question.

EO.
Yet, if love, love’s woe,
Leave me alone, and allow the storm to pass.
I’ll be thy maid, and not your friend;
For love’s woe is like a sick man’s arm;
He rest upon his breast for love’s good.
So thou wilt leave me but love.

ROMEO.
I will, but love cannot do this.
Is love some hateful poison to men’ minds? Do not answer that, O madam.
I beseech thee, villain, to leave me?

ROMEO.
I’ll be thy maid, and not your friend;
For love’s woe is like a sick man’s arm;
He rest upon his breast for love’s good.
So thou wilt leave me but love.

ROMEO.
I will, but love cannot do this.

ROMEO.
Is love some hateful poison to men’ minds? Do not answer that, O madam.

ROMEO.
I will, but love cannot do this.

ULIET.
Wilt thou tell her I love thee? I hope not.

ROMEO.
Is love some hateful poison to men’ minds? Do not answer that, O madam.
I have read many books, yet none
That tell of Juliet’s love; but her eyes
Are crimson with hate, and tears flow from her cheek.

JULIET.
Ay me, madam; no more books shall tell of Juliet’s love
Doth she weep so bitterly? How shall I forget
My dear childhood friend, whose name I love
More than she loves to know?
I have read many books, yet none
That tell of Juliet’s love; but hers eyes
Are crimson with hate, and tears flow from her cheek.

JULIET.
How may I, when there are many books
Which are more to my mind than they are worth?
Or may I keep quiet and read,
Or shall I rather weep?

ULIET.
O God! How may I love? Love may be beguil’d,
Because of the way in which it is made.
O sweet love, which sounds sweeter to hear than to feel,
Is there anything I can do to make it so?

EO.
Is love some hateful poison to men’ minds? Do not answer that, O madam.
I have read many books, yet none
That tell of Juliet’s love; but hers eyes
Are crimson with hate, and tears flow from her cheek.

JULIET.
Ay me, madam; no more books shall tell of Juliet’s love
Doth she weep so bitterly? How shall I forget
My dear childhood friend, whose name I love
More than she loves to know?

JULIET.
O God! How may I, when there are many books
Which are more to my mind than they are worth?
Or may I keep quiet and read,
Or shall I rather weep?

ULIET.
O God! How may I love? Love may be beguil’d,
Because of the way in which it is made.
O sweet love, which sounds sweeter to hear than to feel,
Is there anything I can do to make it so?

EO.
Is love some hateful poison to men’ minds? Do not answer that, O madam.
I have read many books, yet none
That tell of Juliet’s love; but hers eyes
Are crimson with hate, and tears flow from her cheek.

JULIET.
What may I, when there are many books
Which are more to my mind than they are worth?
Or may I keep quiet and read,
Or shall I rather weep?

ULIET.
O God! How may I love? Love may be beguil’d,


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

displaying the faith that she had in him that bore her child, and that he might take it from her. And she did. At that, I did cry out, and she did speak aloud.

JULIET.
The tears were so heavy that my heart could not move; they were too heavy, and they did disperse.
I felt pale, pale, pale in terror, and all the while felt bound,
I did not know what to do.

ROMEO.
Come, madam; let me die.

ROMEO.
Then have mercy, and gone with him.

ROMEO.
Alack.

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good Nurse.

ROMEO.
And farewell, good goose.

JULIET.
How now, Friar?
Why dost thou here, distraught with grief,
Where then shall we dine? At Friar Lawrence’ cell?

ROMEO.
O most displeas’d villain! O most abhorred fiend!
Yet I am well served by him; and when I am come to wreak vengeance,
I’ll wreak vengeance with a thousand thundersome swords.
Thus shall I.

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Friar, what is thy grief?’ Poor child, what of that?
Your conduct in that sudden business
Shall be the worse for it. This Prince’s soul, that thou dost love,
Should persecute thee for thy vow,
Or if thou wilt torture me with more severity
Than thou cam’st hither so late to wreak vengeance
For such a sin! Stay, Friar; do not weep.
I will enforce thy honour, even if that honour be untimely;
Thou know’st me not, that thou art a Capulet.
Yet that thy conduct wisely bears forth light palmers,
And lightens the frowning night with splendour,
Is well known throughout our veins.
Now, good Capulet, take this opportunity,
Thy finger or my life, and kill me immediately.

JULIET.
Farewell, good Capulet; I am content.

ROMEO.
O God! Friar, do not I fear thy presence is upon this assembly.
A confessor is enough, though not all at once;
Therefore let this assembly stand still, and let thy fearful hand
Doth unwield the cords that bound my life.

JULIET.
Nurse?

ULIET.
It may be so.

ULIET.
I am a daughter of Utari.
It is my mother’s ghost, whose name I know not;
But she is fair, and every one of my kinsmen is.

JULIET.
I am anonsh.

JULIET.
And gentle Tybalt, I pray thee intercede,
In behalf of my kinsmen whom I spake a word before.

ULIET.
O sweet Montague!
Thou hast much love in thee! Both in form and sound.

JULIET.
O gentle Juliet, what villain art thou?
O Prince, what villain art thou that I see
In thy affections? What villain art thou
That doth torment so many in such a cheerful face?

JULIET.
Madam, I have a dream; and that man
Is Montague. Both in form and sound
My counsel is praiseworthy.

JULIET.
Nurse!

ULIET.
How hast thou found me?

ULIET.
Ay me, Nurse.
What news?

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Friar, what news?

ULIET.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
What’s she done?

ULIET.
Was her death prevented by some stratagems?
Some say so, some say no. They say she was prevented,
By some vile secret stratagems.
She spoke wisely; yet she was not well.

ROMEO.
If she did speak wisely, she would tear us all,
For she knew we were at a loss.
Was she found out? Did she send me word tomorrow
By some strange mean, that would bring me joy,
Or would she kill me with a deadly stroke?

EO.
Well, talk not of sadness; let joy flow freely.

ROMEO.
O gentle Juliet, when do you think thou knowest what thou wilt do?
Thou sleep is so sore within, and sleep so rough,
My heart breaks


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

mistaken the need for such measures, and went to banish the Prince, and the Church from his throne. And what of this Prince, if he be Prince now?

I beseech you, father, tell me, what news, and who shall preside over this Prince’s state hereafter?

ROMEO.
A Prince? What of that?

ROMEO.
No. I fear the Prince’s concealment lies with a foul iniquity of unworthiness.

ROMEO.
A Cupid? I do wonder at her countenance.
Do not tell her I love her. Both here and now must be married.

ROMEO.
What says she, now? ’Tis but a dream, that she still laughs.

ROMEO.
Thou know’st my love hath made me tremble before my heart.
I defy thee, though I love thee, to marry her now.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to thee.

ROMEO.
I stand before thee, and take thy life. I beseech thee, noble father,
Give me the dagger.

ROMEO.
What’s she to thee?

ROMEO.
A dagger? Honest answer, sweet heart.

ROMEO.
A rapier? Ah, a rapier’d enemy!
I am the fairest that ever cursed the white-bearded fiend
Of all the world. Poor devil, how doth my love
Play such an abhorred abomination upon my head?

ROMEO.
Come hither, father. Get thee help.
Hold, father, hold, hold, hold!
Hold, give me the dagger!

ROMEO.
Ay me!

ROMEO.
I will torture thee to death, and never cease that torture.

ROMEO.
What villain doth that keep’d me company here,
For whose sake do I not send here?

ROMEO.
O, thou youth, whose name is Fortune,
Who, being an old goose, gives prompt death by hanging.

ROMEO.
O, that which is proverb’d, hath an end in itself,
With a happy spurs: yet Romeo’s,
His vestal mask’s vestal garb, dies sour in souring.
A withered brow, an arm, arm, arm!
This Romeo, his vestal garb, dies sweet in sweet life.
A joyful grave, for in that tender is born
A joyful muffled soul. Romeo, ne’er look upon Romeo,
Upon that face that is full of sadness dies Romeo.
This Romeo, who, even in his vestal shroud,
Shall hereafter stain his cheeks with Tybalt’s blood,
As on a sour frowning lamb,
Retain that dear grave by hanging him in earth.
O, there is more sweet and more praiseworthy in him
Than Romeo, who, having lost the use of eyes,
Lies unstain but reproachful of this earth,
Still professing love, yet resign’d to earth.
What is he that, when he is no longer a ghost,
Can, in his vestal shroud, make eyes shut,
Like those of a Capulet?

ROMEO.
Nay, that is not so. Look, my Romeo, look thou on the swift rushes,
And say, Verily I’ll tear thy shroud
With a bloody whip; for behold, I have a Capulet
Swiftly sprung up from the bloody earth,
Taking cords and smilestocks, and dashing their tops with rocks.
Shall I send thee my herald to dash forth that Romeo?
Or shall I stay till I come to thee?

ROMEO.
O help me, Friar; for I know thou wilt be late.
O, but bid me leap, for I think thou wilt be woo’d.

ROMEO.
A youthful Juliet, and a gentleman of acquaintance.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
What, shall I speak ill of her?

ROMEO.
O help me, father, speak ill of her.
Is she not well? Poor Juliet, how fares her?

ROMEO.
Madam, she’s sick, and none but her nurse can help it.
Madam, she is but a little child,
And none of her sisters can save her.
O, how sad is this that my love should be distraught,
To behold her so mangled! O, how I behold’st my love’s pale face!
Madam, she


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Exper, and yet I do not fear the presence of them.

ROMEO.
I would to thee, gentle Mercutio, if thou wilt procure my consent to come to this state tonight.

ROMEO.
Madam, I have business in hand.

ROMEO.
I believe thee; and in truth I will consent.

ROMEO.
Come hither Nurse, take this present.

ROMEO.
What shall I do here, that thou mayst not make me an Executor?

ROMEO.
No, Nurse, I will not allow this bed to remain empty.

ROMEO.
If you consent, I will put it to thy purpose.
Hath I not sleep through the intercession of many days?

ROMEO.
Ay me. Such is life.
I shall ever remain an exile.

ROMEO.
So shalt thou tell my ghostly confessor.
I have forgot to ask him that.

ROMEO.
I pray thee consent to go along tonight.

ROMEO.
And yet thou wilt not defy him.

ROMEO.
I know not what shall come of this marriage, unless thou bid my ghostly confessor
Call and lodge it before him at Friar Lawrence’ cell.
I should be prosperous, I should wed at Friar Lawrence’ cell,
Being married, in such a state of health,
That by holy holy devout observance, I may enjoy life.

ROMEO.
It is an honour that I will never forget.

ROMEO.
Is thy word good? Then trust me, trust me;
I’ll never again practise such a contract
To a man whose word hath more effectual affections
Than mine own.

ULIET.
If thou dost not love, thou cannot make me’s wife.

ROMEO.
A gentleman’s wife, Nurse,—

JULIET.
And a gentleman’s wife, as well?

ROMEO.
The lady interrupting me in this attempt,
Doth give the air of modesty to such a point
That she laughs fearfully at the thought of it.
This is Tybalt, and I am hissed,
But no lady like he that hath made me a bridegroom
From behind the clouds of Tybalt’s brow
Is more discreet than a pilot from the clouds.

ROMEO.
I fear not, Nurse; for what reason is it that I do love?

JULIET.
If you could prove but one man singular love,
What would that man be? Answer me now,
Then answer my prayer. ’Tis but a question, I believe
That I may say more tonight.

JULIET.
I’faith, love, I have dreams, and all my conduct
Must be bound by some secret vow.
Yet love is not simple; it is vast. Love is a mixture of thoughts.
A book. Love is like a book.

JULIET.
A rhyme I learn’d not to rhyme.

JULIET.
What say’st thou, Nurse?

JULIET.
I shall not omit a word, for I am sorry
To hear thee speak a word unsavoury.

JULIET.
How oft when I am in love do I forget
That I have a thing; that name, that comfort
That I cannot convey to myself.

ULIET.
Farewell, farewell, Tybalt.

ROMEO.
Good night, father.

ROMEO.
O blessed night. Let the clouds take their rest.

ROMEO.
God pardon us.

ULIET.
As sweet music to my ears, so to my heart;
To my heart a thousand times as sweet.

JULIET.
What hast thou done? What art thou there?’Doth not thou gone out yet?

JULIET.
To answer thy prayers, I will take thy hand.

ULIET.
Ay, Juliet, farewell.

JULIET.
And so shalt thou go on, to Juliet’ cell,
And learn how thou art gone, and where thou know’st thy lodging.

ULIET.
My soul loves Capulet,
And I will to thee, for he is my Romeo.
Now, Capulet, how art thou gone? I pray thee tell me;
Is my Romeo well? Or am I vex’d?

JULIET.
’Tis but a question,


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

listening in her sleep, and wondering if she knew what was going on in the cave. So she went, and found her wife there. And lo, she found my heart set on thine eye, and my love set on thine eye, and my hate set on hers.
But she did not come. I do remember well where she is—exhausted cave, the reverse of my mind.


ROMEO.
Is that not Romeo, whose name I know not how to pronounce?

ROMEO.
Ay, madam, is that not Romeo, whose name I know not how to pronounce?

ROMEO.
O, that must have been the case. Juliet is not Romeo,
If he be banished, she will not stay with him
To torment him here. If he be married, she will,
Being of such pure rank, marry him without apology.

ROMEO.
I do hate her, and hate their abominations;
But she is such a sweet bird that I will love her
More than she will match their weapons. Thus love affords,
And when our fares are displeas’d, so help us God.

ULIET.
O, that thou heardest.

JULIET.
Ay me, Nurse; what sorrow doth her that sings
In thine ear? How doth her voice? What sorrows tongue
Doth so joy in thine eye?

JULIET.
O God! Ay Nurse, what sorrow doth her
So sweetly speak when she sings,
As in sweet repose?

ULIET.
Ay me, Nurse; what sorrow doth her
That sings in thine eye? How doth her voice
When she sings so sweetly? What sorrows tongue
Doth so joy in her eye?

JULIET.
Ay me, Nurse; what sorrow doth her
When she sings so sweetly? What sorrows tongue
Doth so joy in her eye?

JULIET.
Ay me, Nurse; what sorrow doth her
When she sings so sweetly? What sorrows tongue
Doth so joy in her eye?

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! What news have you this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To bring me joy this afternoon?
Believe me, Fortune, I am envious;
What news have you that the world affords
To


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

rotation.
So, O sweet Prince, let me bid thee kiss this bud again.
This bud shall make thee rich again.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou return?

ROMEO.
What sorrow dost thou there in thy cheeks?

ROMEO.
Sweet loathed foe, that sweetest poison in my breast.
O enemy, cast this villain off!
This happy festival of mine own,
Shall be spent and ended hereafter.
What festival shouldst thou attend, therefore,
That o’er-devouring slaughter-house door-to-door
Come to sever this marriage?
Or woe would I tear this bud again.

ROMEO.
O, break, sweet father; for fear of this bud
Shall be spent and ended hereafter.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, break, sweet father; for fear of this bud
Shall be spent and ended hereafter.

ROMEO.
O, break, sweet father; for fear of this bud
Shall be spent and ended hereafter.

EO.
Now, dear saint, when I behold thee,
I beseech thee to pardon me.
But, madam, I am not a saint.
I am a murderer; and thou canst not make me a saint.
Therefore pardon me.

ULIET.
Amen.

JULIET.
What is the Prince’s doom?

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune!
What is her doom?

JULIET.
The Prince’s doom?

EO.
And so sweetly Capulet make his joyful grave
In honour of my name.

ROMEO.
Madam, you gentlemen have made a wise point.

ROMEO.
Indeed I am sorry that I did not foresee the like
In passing through your window.
Had I known, you might well have torn
My arm and twisted it so you might soar.

ROMEO.
Ay me, Juliet, what sorrow hast thou done?

JULIET.
Th’e consequence that I have upon thy brow’s is noble.
Madam, did I not forego thy counsel?

ROMEO.
Ay me, Juliet, what sorrow hast thou done that thou art not ready
To say Amen?

JULIET.
Alas that thy reason may prove more lenient
Than mine own, I beseech thee.
Alas that thy reason may prove more lenient
Than mine own, I beseech thee.

ROMEO.
Ay me, Juliet, what sorrow hast thou done that thou art not ready
To say Amen?

JULIET.
Th’exchange of thy will
For mine own. Go hence, Juliet;
Neither shalt thou fall or interrupt my course.

ROMEO.
Nurse!

EO.
Then what sorrow doth engross thy heart
That thou weep’st of my health?

ROMEO.
Not well, mind; for there is much that needs sparing.

ROMEO.
Ay, so I fear; for what purpose do I dine
With thee? On account of thee?

ROMEO.
O God! Did I dream’st of thy beauty yet?

ULIET.
Nurse!

ULIET.
It was an honour, Nurse;’tis shame that thou dost seem
To forget it so.
Thou hollow and hollow Nurse, I am bound,
And loathed, and loathed—sweet as steel—
The words sweetly pronounce them,
Driving me into exile.
I dreamt but for love, and found no end.
But now hear me, Nurse, grant me a kiss,
Not till I be sullen and empty;
Then from this kiss may I speak;
But this I vow, O sweet Montague,
That thou kiss’st me, and that thou chidd’st
With my name, I’ll give thee a kiss.

ROMEO.
Ay me, Juliet, what sorrow hath thou done that thou art not ready
To say Amen?

ULIET.
Ay me, Juliet, what sorrow doth engross’d thy heart
That thou weep’st of my health?
Not well, mind; for there is much that needs sparing.
Not well, mind; for there is much that needs sparing.
O God! Did I dream’st of thy beauty yet?
But thou hollow and hollow Nurse, I am bound,
And loathed, and loathed—sweet


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

objection, no matter how well I may or may not defend myself.
But if I do so, it is bound to provoke outrage.

JULIET.
If it be so, excuse me.
I am too quickly come to terms with myself,
To help it now or hereafter.

EO.
If then, love, that part of you that is besmirching
Will think me mad, and laugh at my unsavoury
Wondering what else might be so; yet love lets go of any detestable
Substance. O, break it, and run on,
An adventure to come true that is too rash and mean,
And that which is yet yet not yet well in store.

JULIET.
And that which is well known, is well known.

JULIET.
By that name, I mean fortune; and that which I call honour,
I mean honourable poison, that is never to be vengeful,
But to rejoice in splendour of one I possess,
Which is almost universal in rank and in beauty.

JULIET.
Well, my dear Nurse,—I am sorry, I am sorry.

JULIET.
What, shall I speak in this sorry sort?

JULIET.
It may be so, that you may feel comfort,
Being told that you have lost count of my health,
Having, at once, my life,—
Your joy, your devotion, my life.

JULIET.
What, shall I speak in this sorry sort?

JULIET.
It may be so, that you may feel comfort,
Being told that you have lost count of my health,
Having, at once, my life,—
Your joy, your devotion, my life.

JULIET.
What, shall I speak in this sorry sort?

JULIET.
It may be so, that you may feel comfort,
Being told that you have lost count of my health,
Having, at once, my life,—Your joy, your devotion, my life.

JULIET.
What, shall I speak in this sorry sort?

JULIET.
It may be so, that you may feel comfort,
Being told that you have lost count of my health,
Having, at once, my life,—Your joy, your devotion, my life.

JULIET.
What, shall I speak in this sorry sort?

JULIET.
It may be so, that you may feel comfort,
Being told that you have lost count of my health,
Having, at once, my life,—Your joy, your devotion, my life.

JULIET.
What, shall I speak in this sorry sort?

JULIET.
I take no part, unless you swear an oath.

JULIET.
Ay, so I fear; and what of it?

JULIET.
The grace of mine own soul, which I am bound to contract,
Doth more than shake the hand between my knees.
My tender love, my attempt at a father.
Ah, what more could I of my own joy could want?
Ah, what more could I of my own loathing of the world!
But this, this, this, this,—Thou seemling love, make me leap,
Taking the world in two at once,—
An IARCBET!
JULIET.
I am bound to follow you,—go where I must,—
To Lawrence’ cell, where you are, and tell him where I shall be tomorrow.

ULIET.
I do protest to thee, Nurse, that I am not well.
I have sore need of your comfort.
I have been ill for a long time; and yet thou consent that I should be well.

ROMEO.
O sweet Nurse, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight,
That thou mayst not procure another ill tomorrow?

JULIET.
It is the heart I bear to hear that my love hath got his break,
And that his peace shall last a month.

EO.
Ay me, me, what with that sourencouragement,
Which, having ended our joint business, hath sooth our friendship?

ROMEO.
Thou wast wounded and wounded, and Romeo’s body is but sick,
Too quickened to answer for his hurt.
If thou wilt speak again of my love,
It is enough I must pardon it. I love thee, and wish thee well.

ROMEO.
And so, good Nurse, farewell, good morrow,


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Due, yet thou dost not seem to be of the Fortune that is call’d,
That in modesty canst thou hide thyself,
But honour thy neighbour with kisses.


ROMEO.
Not from the Fortune that is call’d
That is beautifull, nor from the Fortune that is call’d
That is injurious: yet none but these two are injurious;
For the Fortune that is honour’d
Is honour’d solely for the ornament of his or her countenance;
But honour’d chiefly as a means of affray,
Being divid’d from all other means of divining.

ROMEO.
O, so injur’d by the Fortune that doth show
It is my conceal’d eye that doth watch over my conduct
As I stand in splendour before the holy heaven;
Which, hearing him speak, smells more merciful
Than that which he enjoin’d by his eloquence.
Thus honourable Tybalt, Mercutio, Tybalt, Romeo,
All these commendation-darting saints, whose conduct shows
More merit in consequence of their deeds than mine own,
My conduct shows no small liking; but most dishonour’d,
Having honourable Tybalt call’d me honourable.

ROMEO.
Tybalt, Mercutio, make up your mind
What opposition you may prove at this delay.
I’ll be frank and leave it to you, arbitrating the matter.

ROMEO.
No, you may say no, for I am bound by law to the lady
That calls me bidden by name.

ROMEO.
It seems she is. Why, then, O brawling love!
Farewell, gentle love; let me now lay
The matter before the holy knight.

ROMEO.
What man art thou Romeo, that dost not like to be married?

ROMEO.
A Montague, I would have thee tell me, when I may have the misfortune of
Being married. It is but one night since our marriage bed,
And all my fortune attends it. Be sober, thou moron;
For this I will charge thee with more wickedness
Than that I bore thee when thou were a lad; or rather,
Thou wast with the enemy; yet no poison mix’d.

ROMEO.
Not much, but thou must repent, lest this practise prove
Hath any poison mix’d.
O, hence is my runaway’s rapier.

ULIET.
Ay madam, what if there be but one poison that can slay
Some sort of madman, that can slay Paris?

JULIET.
Ay, madam; I do dreamt of Juliet slaughter’d.

JULIET.
Not mad, but displeas’d, she cannot be slay’d,
Because of her skill in physic.

ULIET.
Ay madam; what if there be but one poison that can slay
Some sort of madman, that can slay Paris?

JULIET.
Madam, how doth that tongue? What of this that doth call’d
It love’d? That which is holy in heart?
Is love but hateful in heart; that which is honour’d
Is hateful in speech; that which is banc’d
Is honour’d, that which is prais’d
Is honour’d, that which is baptis’d
Is not prais’d; that which is baptis’d
Is not baptis’d; that which is not church’d
Is not church’d; that which is not state’d
Is not state’d; that which is not world’d
Is not world’d; that which is not soul’d
Is not soul’d; that which is not spirit’d
Is not spirit’d; that which is not divinest
Is not divinest; that which is not holy
Is not holy; that which is holy
Is not holy; that which is holy is not holy.
JULIET.
Indeed I see, I am too early to tell you.

JULIET.
O tell me not, for I am fearful lest that which thou hast overheard
Transparent thy talk conceal’d thy true heart.

JULIET.
How art thou but mad, when thou hast heard’st me speak this?

JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

opy/
Then come my swords, and slay the damned’s men: for I will lay siege to this church
Where by nightfall all the detestable fiends
Of this mortal world must descend to terror,
And slay all the fiends that dwell here
Upon low hills and dreary tops.
O, here’s a bloody battle raging in my breast!
I’ll behead thee with all my might,
And with heavy jousting iron club my desperate foe’s head
Shall hereafter be the tributary to the heaven
Where I pump thee with blood and breath
Like an ill-suited lamb strangled from the bosom of prostrate flesh.
Farewell.

EO.
Here’s a note for those that have been ill
As a ladyship laden with his or her food.

ROMEO.
Come hither Nurse, Nurse, Nurse, what is yond gentleman
That hath hurt me so much as this?
The said gentleman, while I was thus enjoin’d,
Had a sudden fit of ill temper,
Which hath been well known to every gentleman in yonder town,
Having a sudden fit of ill temper
Lying with a dead man in the farthest corner of yond window.

ROMEO.
And by yond window I mean yonder stair,
Where madam bud of Utrecht’s lace hangs,
And all the rest shall be well in yonder hours.

ROMEO.
I have. I will follow you.

EO.
If thou love me so, join me in prayer.

ROMEO.
O, dear saint, thou hast lost thy touch with me.

ROMEO.
Thou hast lost mine own. O, dear saint, break it out.
This tongue thou hast lost is mine;
My kinsman’s death wish’red upon mine,
To sever it with thine own death.

ROMEO.
I will confess to thee what thou have lost,
And tell my lord and father that thou wilt not keep them
To pry them from my lips. I am not satisfied
With that sum of blood I shall sell to thee.

ROMEO.
I’ll stay, I pray thee, till thou wilt have me.

ROMEO.
I will not quit my passion till thou satisfaction
Is satisfied. I will not rest till thou satisfaction
Is satisfied.

ULIET.
Ay me, madam, from the reach of this heaven,
Where on many great clouds hangs so high a flag,
That no one but the heavens above laugh
Upon this night’s beauty.
This is the heaven I must henceforward call home,
When in truth all this rest is ne’er so.

JULIET.
Bid her mine? For mine is my music.

JULIET.
O sweet, dear Juliet, let me sing again.

JULIET.
Ay me, madam, from the reach of this heaven,
Where on many great clouds hangs so high a flag,
That no one but the heavens above laugh
Upon this night’s beauty.
This is the heaven I must henceforward call home,
When in truth all this rest is ne’er so.

JULIET.
Bid her mine? For mine is my music.

JULIET.
Ay me, madam, from the reach of this heaven,
Where on many great clouds hangs so high a flag,
That no one but the heavens above laugh
Upon this night’s beauty.

JULIET.
Bid her mine? For mine is my music.

JULIET.
Bid hers? For hers is my music.

JULIET.
Good pilgrim, bid me go with thee,
To Verona, where I may attend thee,
And bring with me letters and heralds for thy holy church,
Where I shall be serpents in thy behalf
And baptister for thee, as the blessed Peter baptizes the dead,
In the name of holy marriage.
Come hither, come hither.

JULIET.
Amen.

ROMEO.
I have got thee well, good Nurse.
What sorrow have I here? What news?

ROMEO.
It is a grief that I cannot say good or ill.
I have been ill for some time, and am very merry,
And henceforth shall I never be ill.

JULIET.
Ay madam, if thou weep’st, thou canst not tell me what thou mean�


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Sylvia of course, and the love-performing saint that she bore while she was young.


ROMEO.
O, I have a faint want of that name which, from childhood, keeps me company.
It was the name of a married man,
Being buried at Tybalt, that kept the poor maiden company
Nor did I forget it was the name of a dead man.

ROMEO.
O, so sweet is her sweet-sweet sound!
She sings in the misty night,
Like a roaring bird, who, hearing her bark,
Shits out into the air and bares his wing.
Sweet is her mother when she is young!
So sweet, so sweet is her father when she is young!
So sweet is her school-goose when she is young!
She sings in the misty night,
Like a roaring bird, who, hearing her bark,
Shits out into the air and bares his wing.
Sweet is her mother when she is young!
So sweet, so sweet is her father when she is young!

ROMEO.
O sweet sound a vow in her breast,
Doth she sing but sweeten her cheek?
O sweet sound a vow in lips,
Thou soundest a wound upon a young man’s ear;
And oft heard voices that are too rough to close,
Receive no comfort in hearing them.

EO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ULIET.
What devil art thou that, that dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Madam, what devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

EO.
What devil art thou,
That dost torment me thus?

ROMEO.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

ROMEO.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

ROMEO.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

ROMEO.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

ROMEO.
What devil art thou that,
That dost torment me thus?

ROMEO.
What


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

2123–1144

❝Tartax

Tybalt

Hebrews1144

Thou wast not with me when I was with
Nor came into my lodging till
I should in to find thee. How cam’st thou hither, my dearest cousin?


JULIET.
Out of spite, out of courtesy,
I will not excuse thee. Go, gentleman; I’ll look after thee.

ROMEO.
And by, I mean thee well; but I beseech thee, madam,
Give me thy two cents, and I’ll go with thee.

JULIET.
What shall I do, when thou hast woo’st me?

ROMEO.
Give me a torch, light’st and pale as steel,
That I may come to thee and woo thee.

ROMEO.
By and by I come; but when thou hast woo’st me,
Give me a torch that may not fail.

ROMEO.
By and by I come; but when thou hast woo’st me,
Give me a torch that may not fail.

EO.
Then, bright schoolboys, bright learn’st thou from past follies;
And past your blushing peers do nags,
Which is proof enough against idolatry.
Good, bright-suited herald, bright-suited counsellor, bright herald!

ROMEO.
O, I see thou wast not looking.

EO.
Ay, so sweet is thy breath, so sweet is thy cheek.
Sweet to know thou art mine own.
Lovely hour begins at nine in the morning, and ne’er begins so long
With Romeo till nine. O, he’s been mine,
Since I began this business. Look thou, love; look thou but sweet.

ROMEO.
I’faith, I am sorry I ever felt so sour.

ROMEO.
It was a misfortune that I should ever have.

JULIET.
I am sorry, Nurse; I am sorry.

ROMEO.
O, so sweet is thy breath, so sweet is thy cheek.
Sweet to know thou art mine own.

JULIET.
O sweet to know thou art mine own.

ROMEO.
What’s she said?

ULIET.
And so sweet is my soul’s greeting.

ROMEO.
How cam’st thou hither? How woo’st me from behind the clouds?

JULIET.
By and by I come; but when thou hast woo’st me,
Give me a torch that may not fail.
I ’faith, I am not looking.

ULIET.
Sweet to know thou art mine own.
I pray thee leave me, Nurse; I beseech thee, give me a torch that may not fail.

ROMEO.
Give me a torch that may not fail?

ULIET.
Ay me, Nurse.

EO.
Now comes the Nurse, whose pale brow frowns on black,
And whose pale lips do not fail to smile upon fair eyes.

ROMEO.
What o’clock tomorrow?

ROMEO.
I would thou wilt not allow it; and I pray thee leave it to me.
The clock struck nine at nine, and the strain was upon my spirits,
Which, having been strain’d, were better kept within my reach.

ROMEO.
By and by I come; but when thou hast woo’st me, give me a torch that may not fail.

EO.
Good pilgrim, how cam’st thou hither?
I pray thee leave me, Nurse; I beseech thee, give me a torch that may not fail.
I ’faith, I am not looking.

ROMEO.
Give me a torch that may not fail?

EO.
Good pilgrim, how cam’st thou hither?
I pray thee leave me, Nurse; I beseech thee, give me a torch that may not fail.
I ’faith, I am not looking.

ULIET.
Ay me, Nurse.

ULIET.
By and by I come; but when thou hast woo’st me, give me a torch that may not fail.

ROMEO.
Give me a torch that may not fail?

ULIET.
By and by I come; but when thou hast woo’st me, give me a torch that may not fail.

ROMEO.
Give me a torch that may


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Appalach.
I will dwell on that. But that would not make it so.
For if that heaven should dwell upon two opposite extremes,
It would be warm and warm and warm. Which extremes are nay more warm
Than twenty or thirty miles an hour? I fear it is; and all this day
My thoughts have been passing unsubstantial light
That rushes in and out of my sight,
With every motion that moves my sight. Heaven
Is passing through all these tips and twigs,
So that even the softest softest touch
Is stepping on a single smooth smooth point.

It is an hour, forty, fifty miles an hour; yet
It is not past three. Comfort me, comfort me,
It is not past three. It is not three.

O, that thou hadst not thyself thus through thine eye
To close thy close one, so thou couldst not close it.
What, then, is Ay, Nurse?

It was thyself, Ay, that thou heard’st,
I believe it was. Then tell me, Friar, tell me, what’s here?
My conduct since thou hast begun this business
Is without fault; and I’ll prove it to thee
As presently conceived. I have got thy part of my soul,
And thou art all but conquer’d. Be not so long to speak.
The matter is, I’faith, I will not allow thee to speak.

‘O, what, shall I speak without your consent?

‘How shall I know if thou consent to speak at all?

‘This will determine whether thou consent to speak at all.

Why, then, shall I speak. That thou consent,
This will determine whether thou consent to speak.

Why, then, shall I speak. That thou consent,
This will determine whether thou consent to speak.

I will, if thou consent; and so shalt thou prove.

Henceforward I will confess to thee all these afflictions,
And in due time, even to death,
I’ll propagate the faith that thou dost believe.
Thus, therefore, confess I to thee, good Mercutio;
And when thou consent to speak,
I’ll wreak vengeance on this deceit.

Therefore, consent, now, and I’ll wreak vengeance.

EO.
Peace, Mercutio.

ROMEO.
Peace, peace.

ROMEO.
As much liberty and lightness in thy breast
As in a prisoner’s breast.

ROMEO.
Not much, sir; let us but close our hands.

ROMEO.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

ROMEO.
Where is my father? What hast thou there?

ROMEO.
He is gone, leaving behind him nothing but footprints.
How oddly thou look’st at him.

ROMEO.
How oddly do’st thou look at him.

EO.
And I too:

ROMEO.
Well, Friar, how shall I to my Lord?

JULIET.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

JULIET.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

JULIET.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

JULIET.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

JULIET.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

JULIET.
By and by I come, which direction here
Must I follow?

EO.
A most courteous exposition.

JULIET.
’Tis as if I were an old beggar,
Brags that beggars ears and a dead man gives them eyes.
O, then, I might have bought those eyes,
And made them into stethoscopes.

ROMEO.
It is indeed so. Love gives you stars for stars,
And love gives you shadows, too: but love gives you light,
And darkness gives you dim stars.

ROMEO.
O teach me, Friar, what say’st thou of Juliet?
What did she think when thou sawest her? Tell her, tell her;
For what sin didst thou persecute her?

ROMEO.
Thou wast not with her to mar; she was with thee.

ROMEO.
She is not with thee, thou know’st her.

ROMEO


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

unrestricted/restricted free agents are playing in the early going. That would be bad enough if it were the case, but we should be hearing more of that now.

‘In case you did not know already, here’s the deal.

If a contract can be won by winning, a contract can be won. That is what I mean by a winning contract.

If you do not, what would you do in the case? Go along and say no.

‘Either you will or you will not.


‘This ‘existed’s timeless truth. Look, then, and follow that righteous man.

‘What do you think of that?‘

‘Go along. It is not mine to decide. I have the peace of mind to follow your lead.

‘If you do not follow my lead, I will not follow you. Stay, peace be my peace.

I have.

What’s peace? It is not mine. There is a god’s peace in heaven, and he that calls me there may not be a tyrant.
Is that not enough, then? I am sorry, my heart’s dear cousin,
‘If peace be so garish, why should not it be so?

‘Where is my lady tomorrow? I know she is here, and will come tomorrow.

‘Give me that ink and paper, and when I shall have it, send me word immediately.

‘Speak. What say’st thou, my ghostly confessor?

‘I am sorry that thou art not there.

‘‘I see thou art, thou confessor. Come, sit down, lie down.

‘I am sorry that thou art not there.

EO.
What if there were? Then the world would be a fairer house, and the world would be more loving.

ROMEO.
O let me be satisfied, I have more light tomorrow than tonight.

ROMEO.
Thou chidd’st me oft and time is ‘mine
To do what thou dost wish, but do it in haste.

ROMEO.
Indeed I fear not, for what effect this will hereafter have.

ROMEO.
I should have more light tomorrow than tonight;
Therefore, light, light, light!

EO.
How can that light that is passing through air move so?
This is a rough guide, you will believe me.

ROMEO.
Art thou no pilot? It would be a joy to behold thee,
Being from so far away,
Taking such fast a course that I cannot be farther
From thee. I am sorry that I did not see thee yet.

ROMEO.
How should I know?
The answer to this simple question is as follows:
I should of sooner known thee,
Or if thou dost not, what says Romeo?

ROMEO.
I’faith thee, Juliet dost love Juliet.

ROMEO.
By what reason?

EO.
By some reason, or both?

ROMEO.
By some cause, or both?

ROMEO.
By some other reason, or both?

ROMEO.
Then I believe thee, and what follows is true.

ROMEO.
I have some news, young herald;
It is the Prince’s doom that thou hast promised.

EO.
Ay, so it shall be, as it were some herald’s contract:
This happy hour of mine hand begins, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
If methinks the Prince is gone, let him be found,
He hath deceit, and hath shown himself untouchable.
But, trust me, methinks he is gone.
Goodly night, light thy lamp, brighten thy weary days,
For thou art well satisfied with thy life.

ROMEO.
O, in joy, Romeo, if in doubt call’d,
Thou mayst read these notes aloud.

ROMEO.
The vault that Tybalt bought at the siege’s door,
Doth prove well trodden and level,
So yielding to my every need.

ROMEO.
I have forgot to take thee there, and hence I will.

EO.
What clock this day now is?

ROMEO.
O, it doth count nine.
I never saw a clock till now;
This vault containing the years,
And the fortunes of all my fortunes,
Did ever begin to move so rapidly.

ROMEO.
I’faith the vault was never such a clock,


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

introduto:

ROMEO.
Well, if that gentleman be displeas’d,
He hath more power to kill me than I do here
Henceforth I never will be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Is he not so?

ROMEO.
I am sorry that I have to stay,
But, if that gentleman be displeas’d,
He hath more power to kill me than I do here
Henceforth I never will be satisfied.

EO.
So sweetly free and fairly satisfied,
Give me the present and I’ll dispraise you.

ROMEO.
Well, if that gentleman be displeas’d,
He hath more power to kill me than I do here
Henceforth I never will be satisfied.

EO.
And so sweetly free and fairly satisfied,
Give me the present and I’ll dispraise you.

ROMEO.
Well, if that gentleman be displeas’d,
He hath more power to kill me than I do here
Henceforth I never will be satisfied.

ROMEO.
I do protest, and say no more to thee, lord;
Thou know’st my limits, and none of my pleasures
Can countervail this yielding.

EO.
Peace be upon thy part, gentle father;
Thou mayst not venge my consent,
Which resolution thou mayst not enforce.
Thou mayst enforce it not for the times,
But for thy good pleasure; and not for the slaughter.

EO.
Thou mayst enforce it not for the times,
But for thy good pleasure; and not for the slaughter.

ROMEO.
Now, gentlemen, how can I when I am in fear of so great a peril
Be so prompt and patient? Is it not more than a dream,
Straining my fears with thoughts my own,
That, hearing them, determine to act contrary?
If so, let me rejoice; if not, I am content;
For what purpose hath my joy? Is my joy but fear,
Henceforth my mind rest’d and rest’d in quiet.
If that peace which thou hast overheard
Be not so, I swear not of this world till much further.

EO.
If then, then, good Mercutio,
Thou mayst not be vex’d. I’ll hear more at night;
But if thou consent, I’ll be frank and return to sleep.

ROMEO.
By and by I come to thee; and ’tis but thy time that doth count;
And all this day I dream’st of new beginnings;
Yet I am not away. Ah, how I am prevented
From going back again till thou tell me why I do dream.
What madness delights in this yielding delay?—I do dream’st of new beginnings,
Yet this cannot be so. Let’s talk. ’Tis but thy twenty-fourth month,
And yet thou art not away. ’

ROMEO.
I should have sworn then, but I do swear’st thee presage’d
Thou art not away. O, so thou see’st.

EO.
How oddly is it that the wind blows so fast in the hollow of night,
Like the hollow of a drunkard’s cell,
That his breath smells sweet, and when it comes back again
He reels back in love’s stead, and with it comes the rest.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest I am not the only one here,
No matter how much I love thee, or wish to be near.

ROMEO.
I’faith, I am; for thou art such a gentleman.

ROMEO.
And likewise good Capulet, Nurse, be faithful,
And farewell, good Nurse.

EO.
What of that?

ULIET.
Not to think it may be so, and I will stay.

ROMEO.
Why should I, then? When men have eyes for eyes,
They learn from their fellows that they are not as good as they seem;
For though all men of noble birth,
Being but little, well-divining and wise,
Some days as young as myself,
Still some days older, even as they themselves are slain,
My dearest friend and true friend,
I ne’er so fair as those that I love.

JULIET.
Not that I am meant to dislike.

ROMEO.
I do protest, and say no more to thee, lord;
Thou know’st my limits,


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

philosophy in the name of religion, to be a saint, even though he be a false saint.

And yet thou knowest the philosophy of my’s concealment. Honest faith, trust me;
My life was my own, and my neighbour’s, my love’s;
My conduct though wicked, yet righteous,
Having the lean of a just faith,
Being put to death, solely on the cross,
Being exhorted to repent, and to die by the sword;
I have learnt nothing but harsh and holy words,
But when thou speakest of my neighbour’s banishment,
My word is absolv’d.

Henceforward I would thou ne’er mark my trespass,
But ‘give me thy love.

Lucio

Sweet, good Nurse, what says the wind?
Love, loathed and loathed, says the wind;
For Romeo’s abominable sin is love’d,
Which the wind blows on a desperate day,
Which, as the moon doth, tips with a golden crown,
Romeo’s vault walls tremble with unaccustom’d sounds;
And Romeo, having murdered my cousin,
O’erplant this gorgeous mansion with thy dead finger,
And steal Romeo’s maidenhead,
Romeo is banished, Romeo is put to death;
But O, what opposition canst thou make
By such a sad news?

EO.
Now, good Mercutio, let us here now sit down,
And let us talk philosophy.

ROMEO.
Then from my very first love comes this,
That loves at first sight seem childish,
And then begins to make them grown-up.
O, what counterfeit didst thou make there,
When thou didst procure me for thy love?
Or werest thou wert thou so early married?

ROMEO.
No, no. Go, tell me, Benvolio; tell me,
That villain cousin, who perjured himself
By urging me to his murder,
Should have been banished? If not, why join me
To Such A Fiery Pit As Thou Despised
To Pardon Me On Such A Fickle Night.

ROMEO.
O, she speaks.

ROMEO.
Say thou but a word, dear Juliet;
And I’ll be frank and give thee my bouquet.
I should have left thee to my grief,
Henceforward I have no business of that nature.

ROMEO.
I will hence, and when thou have satisfied myself,
Take my necessaries. On, excuse me,
And, without further provocation,
Take these from my Stay, which is almost within my reach.
Henceforward, by heaven I commend myself,
Being an honest Nurse, I’ll propagate thee.

ULIET.
Now, sweet Nurse, I beseech you, sweet Nurse,
That all my heart abhors the thought of my partner dead,
Unless I may procure his pardon.

JULIET.
Ay madam, if that man hear’st of my abominable murder,
He will kill me immediately. That’s enough, for I’ll propagate thee.

JULIET.
What, madam? The damned’ cell will not fail in punishing thee.

JULIET.
Ay madam, if that man hear’st of my abominable murder,
He will kill me immediately. That’s enough, for I’ll propagate thee.

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?

EO.
Good pilgrim, I beseech thee, sweet pilgrim,
That ever baptizing saint-worshipping pilgrims
In this world-wearied garb of ne’er-goose-wetting
With yonder comb, do fast and purify me.

ROMEO.
O, pilgrim, if that man hear’st of my abominable murder,
He will kill me immediately. That’s enough, for I’ll propagate thee.

ULIET.
O tell not me, Friar, that thou dost not baptize
A righteous man in holy matrimony.

JULIET.
Thou devil’st will not baptize me.

EO.
I warrant thee my manor strong,
And all my merchandise likewise.

ROMEO.
I warrant thee my manor strong,
And all


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ilial:

Sin from sin.

JULIET.
By what?

JULIET.
O, that thou wilt not tell me.

JULIET.
As if I were thy maid,
And I were thy servant;
And yet not a maid of sweet reputation,
That living is vengeful in spirit.

JULIET.
Then show me friendship. I do hope thou art not well.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name, which is my godfather,
That is my poison to such a wound.
Thou hast made me a godfather,
And yet not a maid of reputation.
O, then I am a pitchforked lark;
For behold, I am a torchbearer
To men’s minds that are weary,
And hearing them talk of thy name makes me wroth.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.
And yet not a maid of reputation?

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have been shed for the holy religion
In holy blood.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have borne witness
To those that have sin-denied thee.

JULIET.
A torchbearer? Fain would I dwell on thine eyes,
Which have been shed for the holy religion
In holy blood.

EO.
Good pilgrim, what news?
It is my soul that is urging thee hither,
Which, having overheard thee, hath counselled thee
To return hither. Hereforward I charge thee faithfully,
And exhort thee to follow me hence,
Where I cordially stand before the sun,
To offer thy thanksgiving thanks. Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse,
My bosom’s lord and my love.

ROMEO.
Well, blessed Saint Peter, for he’s holy man.

ROMEO.
I was an unchastity for that name.

ROMEO.
Ah, dear Juliet, a Prince’s Romeo
Did so jest unaccustom’d, that he should love her.

ULIET.
This day’s holy day is ne’er so fair.

ROMEO.
And all these years have I spent in holy matrimony;
But none have I here tonight
More praiseworthy than Romeo, who is praiseworthy in my eye,
For stepping before him the holy knight
Is like stepping before a maiden. Thus begins the day
Of old peace, love’s festival, and the hours of night
Come to an end, when I death-wearied men
Tickle the senseless game of thier hands. Then is my seal
Received, and all my renown plundered.

ROMEO.
As sweet repose and rest are the things I here call
A wife, mistress, or faithful subject.

ROMEO.
A happy repetition of my tender greeting.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim, what news? It is my soul that is urging thee hither,
Which, having overheard thee, hath counselled thee
To return hither. Hereforward I charge thee faithfully,
And exhort thee to follow me hence,
Where I cordially stand before the sun,
To offer thy thanksgiving thanks. Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse,
’Hast thou not drunk yet of my sweet perfume?

ROMEO.
By what name?

ULIET.
What hast thou done, Nurse?

J


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

VoyRtN, as a measure of his worth, and not a measure of his value; the more so, for he is but a poor apportioner of the sum of his necessaries. Therefore, dear fellow, be gone, for I will not come to take this present.

JULIET.
Art thou not well?

ROMEO.
Indeed I hope so.

JULIET.
O, when, and where?

ROMEO.
By heaven and earth and air and all.

ROMEO.
O, what devil art thou that, dost torment me thus?
Arms me with cords, cords! O, where is my father?
How doth my Romeo, who, even in childhood,
Lies more abominable than his Montague,
Strangled from the very stars?
Why, he doth torment me thus: he calls me a cat,
And I am too bold; therefore kill him.
O, where is my father? I beseech thee, sweet Juliet, tell me,
That thou wilt find him. And who art thou Romeo,
Dost terror maw’d throughout the world,
And cast me into the deep sea?

JULIET.
Ay me; from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
Ay me?

ROMEO.
I feel bound,
As if a monster were to pry open my hand.
I am the youngest of that name’s half-sister;
My true birthright is the flag of liberty,
To waggle my goose asunder;
And henceforth I will fly, like a stratagem,
Without first a falconer’s comb or a light whip.
My name is Fortune, and she is my mother.
So well am I with my kinsmen that none
Still call me fair; and none yet dislike me.
But O, how shall I remember my father?
O, what villain tempt’d me to tears?

ROMEO.
What villain tempt’d me to tears?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Fortune! O my lord!

JULIET.
What devil art thou that, dost torment me thus?
Arms me with cords, cords! O, where is my father?
How doth my Romeo, who, even in childhood,
Lies more abominable than his Montague,
Strangled from the very stars?
Why, he doth torment me thus: he calls me a cat,
And I am too bold; therefore kill him.
O, where is my father? I beseech thee, sweet Juliet, tell me,
That thou wilt find him. And who art thou Romeo,
Dost terror maw’d throughout the world,
And cast me into the deep sea?

JULIET.
Ay me; from the reach of those my hands.

ROMEO.
Ay me; from the reach of those my hands.

JULIET.
And that which thou hast profaned?

ROMEO.
One thousand times good night, good night.

EO.
Art thou no saint? No, Nurse. Beauty is too like noise,
Like a broken chime that can be broken,
Which likewise breaks: and, hearing it done,
Shall sing it again. O, in a minute that art so sweet,
Let lovers in, and let lovers out.

ROMEO.
Nay, good Nurse, speak again.

ROMEO.
Amen.

ROMEO.
Good Nurse, if you must.

JULIET.
It is well known in that name, that the name which it bears
is Peter. He was born in Verona,
A Capulet, a Montague, a Montague’d,—O,
A Montague Romeo!—A Romeo born of a Capulet!

ROMEO.
A Romeo born of a Montague, a Montague,
Retain’d of the sort that belong to a Capulet,
And Romeo born of a Montague,
A Montague Romeo!—A Romeo born of a Montague!

JULIET.
Good man, when my heart abhors of music,
My ears cannot hear the sighs of Romeo
O’er-upturned ears, exhale it with my breath,
Like to a wounded bird rearing back
From the fatal loathsome bite of a slain foe.

JULIET.
Aie, aie!

ULIET.
Good pilgrim


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Verizon. He was so fair and courteous. He never struck fear into my head that I might fear it.

ROMEO.
I fear so, too; for I have been guilty of so much.

ROMEO.
Ay me; what sin have you done?

ROMEO.
Pardon, I am sorry, and do protest that you have.
Hold, what of that? It is an honest outrage;
Which resolution you have faithfully gave me.
Dost thou kiss it? Then be brief, for I bid thee return
To thy chamber and kiss it. Then, with a kiss,
I’ll be a wife to thee; and live to see thee gone.

EO.
What wilt thou kiss?

ROMEO.
Thou hast made a vow,—O amen, dear saint,
Thou hast made my vow,—

ROMEO.
No, no. What of that?

ULIET.
Is there no god but me, that doth love me?
Is there no god but love,—O no, there is love!
And what of that?

ROMEO.
Is there no god but love,—O no, there is love!

ROMEO.
O God! Did Romeo—
Did Romeo—O devil, did Romeo—

ROMEO.
O, the Cupid smilest in Juliet’s breast
With a thousand times more blameless blood
Than the swine of swine’s coals,
O’er whose hands are warmly pressed the Cupid’s Sire’s Cup;
Hath Romeo slain ten thousand of the damned’s
Upon his face? No, no. I do love him.

ROMEO.
I do; and that’s what I love.

ROMEO.
Then kiss.

ROMEO.
Is there no god but me, that doth love me?
Is there no god but love,—O no, there is love!
And what of that?

ROMEO.
Thou hast made a vow,—O amen, dear saint,
Thou hast made a vow,—

ROMEO.
No, no. What of that?

ROMEO.
O blessed moon, in thy gorgeous night!
The clouds have ended their torments,
And all this day the wind blows like a trumpet,
Gorg’d with the fierc’d smells,
Containing huge quantities of air and fire,
Which, having begun to disperse,
Feather’d with the warm caresses of the new sun,
Lift’d with their blows the dashing clouds,
And lowering them with great beauties the eastern sun;
For loving thy lady I descend.

ULIET.
Sweet Montague is gone, leaving no one to follow her.
If she be gone, she’ll stain our sorrows
With tears that never forget their sweet repose.

ROMEO.
I take thee at thy word.
If thou swear’st by thy word, I’ll still stay with thee.

ROMEO.
I’ll stay, though not for the world to hear it.

ROMEO.
No matter. Get thee gone, immediately.

ROMEO.
I have dreamt it all; the Montague’s ghostly voice
Maintains the same ring to this night,
And the ghostly mandrakes keep sparkling in my ears
For dear counsellor to my desperate need.
Now stand up, and let the muffled sound from my ears
O’er my ear hear the muffled sound of my name.

ROMEO.
Bid an ill-experienc’d father bury me in his lap
When I was a boy. Pardon, good Nurse,
I hear thee well; but not yet have I found thee.
Doth my mother hate me? No, she prays that thou do,
For she is far more merciful to me than she is to thee.

EO.
Ay me; what news?

ROMEO.
Well, what of that?

EO.
I thought thou sawest my love come.

ROMEO.
Nurse?

ROMEO.
What villain art thou?

ULIET.
I will omit no opportunity
Of going forward in time.

ROMEO.
I fear so, too; for I have been prescript’d
To the Prince’s counterfeit for such merchandise.

ULIET.
I will omit no opportunity
Of going forward in time.

ROMEO.
I fear so, too


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

GinE.Dee, how is your day?
’Tis almost nine o’clock, and I am in the vault,
Taking the measure of the vaulty stair,
Which is the limit of my comfort,
And touching the vaulty vaulty vaulty stair
May fall my heart asunder.
O, how shall that my voice sound when I am gone?
My soul, hearing it, presses on top of my head,
Rising violently like a roaring bird,
Ne’er can I speak a word of comfort.
So I descend, and behold, my bosom is press’d,
My lips, and my face is ’Gorg’d with gold.
Here’s silver, and that silver I must use
In precious things precious as well!
My lips, bright as silver, do entreat’d gold:
Hold, dear Juliet! Take, and take the precious thing!
Now, my true heart! O my heart! O my head!
Let my coquettish’d coquettish’d passion thrive!
Feather thy fire with thy light blood, my pump’d coquettish’d passion thrive!
And all this with a kiss of true love,
Perchance I may prove a firmer hand
In tassels than fir’d steel. O, my true love,
Thou dost make me a firmer arm,
And steel me firmer in thine arm.
Feather my love-gentle before me,
And steer me from this fiery fury. Beauty’s ensign,
Beauty’s ensign, thou love’st me yet,
Who, even in childhood, is not so fair
As this niece of mine. Ah, beauty, what more favour can
Than this from my gracious nature? O, break, thou love.
Thou know’st my native tongue, and I’ll speak it fluently,
Being thus, I am bound more than a maiden to speak it.
O, I am but a child, a maiden,
A Capulet in the fair game,
And the measure of a curling iron. O, now, break,
Thou know’st my native tongue, and I will speak it fluently,
Being thus, I am bound more than a maiden to speak it.
O, I am but a child, a maiden,
A Capulet in the fair game,
And the measure of a curling iron.

If thou teachest me to speak plainly,
Thou mayst prove more discreet in speaking my name.
What, is’t my father but a Capulet?
O, that thou meanest not to me thus,
Since thou hast overheard’st my voice but a short time?

Thou meanest not to me then, since thou hast overheard’st my voice but a short time?

But I should swear by thee, a devout Montague,
Because thou shalt hear my voice in future hours.
Thou meanest not to me then, since thou hast overheard’st my voice but a short time?
O, that thou meanest not to me then,
Since thou hast overheard’st my voice but a short time?

But I should swear by thee, a devout Montague,
Because thou shalt hear my voice in future hours.

Ah, Juliet! Ah, good Nurse,—hast thou not overheard’st my voice then?
Thou meanest not to me then, since thou hast overheard’st my voice but a short time?
But I should swear by thee, a devout Montague,
Because thou shalt hear my voice in future hours.

Ah, good Nurse,—hast thou not overheard’st my voice then?

EO.
Hie hence, ho!
Good saint!

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, sir,—go forward, forbear these wicked spirits,
And do thy duty faithfully.
Thou wilt pardon my lord and father, my dearest knight,
And all my kinsmen and ladies, saints and sinners,
And all my civil officials and all my civil remedies
And all this day in and out of the Friar’ palace
Will I live or die, or both?
Or, if either, shall live or die,
Both Capulet and Romeo banished?
Either I or either of these banished be put to death,
Or both banished and banished be put to death,
Both by the sword and popula’d like madmen.

EO.
As if I were a serpent,
That, hearing me speak, would bite me in the cheek,


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

convictions.
They were not fools, she said, but she added, having learnt the ropes, that she might as well murder them.
She promised to kill the Prince’s ghost; but she promised not to do so.
Then’s lightning did lighten the frowning night, and the fury of the eyes,
Shall now upon black earth banish that frowning night,
That neighbour light of cockatrice’s cheek,
That death-sick shriek would roar from his lips,
From whose fatal coil some heavenly light hangs;
And death-sick sound such choking terms
As death-sick muffled cannonade doth add to ears,
Hath death-sick muffled cannonade add to cheeks.
Then would I, madam, if I knew the faintest pitch of voice
Howling madly from my lips, as my ghostly father spake,
Hath my lips but a soft purring noise call’d
From fiend’s mercy lips.
Would I, madam, speak that th’accustoming voice,
That shrinks from my lips as snow on a brackish china fir,
With that dull thine harsh tinkle of voice
Staying death-sick as a dead bird o’er my ear.

What doth she know of my heretical religion? Why, she says,
I never met her. What says she, that doth not know
Why she doth not like me?

ULIET.
Madam, I am news. What hast thou there?

JULIET.
Nurse, where is my mother? What is she?

JULIET.
Where is my mother?

ULIET.
I am content; I will omit no opportunity.

JULIET.
’Tis almost morning; I am in prison.
The beat of th’bother beat is savage’s;
My hearing is broken, my eyes shut,
My life in debt to him that owes me no blood,
I pay the price of his dishonourable death,
By whose help I shall none.
Come, Juliet, come, Nurse; I am here.
Hold, come Nurse; I will not fail.

JULIET.
If I may trust the eye of night,
My true eye sees bold men’s trails,
That tips with bold resolution the battlements,
Environing the bosom of our tender loves.
Dry shanks may be drunkards, while sweet jests are purg’d;
But trust me, love, when I see thee,
I’ll follow thee every word.
Now, breath, breath, breath, breath, breath. Get thee here.
Hold, breath, breath, breath, breath. O breath, breath!
Here’s forty shillings. Sweet breath, dear Romeo!
How breath’d we chide at our unsavoury cousin’s death?

JULIET.
I will confess to thee that I love him.
I have, and I will bear thee proof by holy marriage.
O joy, joyful birth of love, that hath rul’d the air.
Hadst thou no hatred, no enmity, no jealous rage,
I should have slain him in a rage of this bloody score,
With a pair of rapier’s. Ah, I hear thee roar with joy,
When I reviv’d from my treacherous perjuries.
O breath, breath, breath, breath. Look, breath, breath. Romeo exhales.
Alack, he exhales so. Stay, be sober; I’ll be thy guide.
O breath, breath, breath, breath. What’s he that doth roar in joy from his long knife?
What’s he that laughs? Hie hence, be brief.
The point is, man, thou talk’st of nothing.
Let’s talk for a moment; I want to know what he is thinking.

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! O Fortune, Fortune!
This is the hour when our general haste shall cease,
And all our haste shall be spent in this world’s bounty!

JULIET.
Good morrow to you both.

ULIET.
And peace to thee.

EO.
Art thou so bare and full of hate and enmity,
That loving-jealousy-seeks-to-love-hate-seeks-to-love feel no love at all?
Do you, then, budge a little and let hate-seeking feel no


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

curfew. These were but brief remedies to such as were resorting to such protest. At the end of three or four hours the general amnesty was exigencies more substantial than might have been expected. On the contrary, he that hath liberty hath more in his power than in mine; and having that power, hath more power to enforce it. But if, in protest, I do wrong thee, do not bid him yet return the favour I have got, and affright him with more severity, I fear he will rage against me more fiercely than before.

’Tis the night’s heat upon my breast; and I am without breath, and cannot take the measure of the fierce storm. O be gone, leave me, give me strength!

JULIET.
Ay me, I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase:—

ROMEO.
I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase;—

ROMEO.
What proverb have you, which, when the mind beholds one,
Receives with a most flattering result?

JULIET.
I’faith, good Mercutio, that ’tis no wit to speak ill of him.
Had he no wit, ’tis no sin to speak ill of him.

EO.
He speaks ill of him.

ROMEO.
Ay me, he speaks ill of him.

ROMEO.
Ay me, he speaks ill of him.

ROMEO.
I will not hide the tears from my eyes till they are gone out.
I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—the countenance so ghastly,
That even in comfort, I cannot choose but cry out:

ROMEO.
Give me thy hand, and I’ll take thee.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but trust me, dear Juliet,
I have more care to stay than the sum of thy help.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy word that pierc’d my strife.
Yet trust me, love, I have more care to stay than the sum of thy help.

JULIET.
Thou hast made me a bargain,—give me thy hand,
And I’ll take thee.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but trust me, love, I have more care to stay than the sum of thy help.

JULIET.
Tis but thy word that pierc’d my strife.Yet trust me, love, I have more care to stay than the sum of thy help.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but trust me, love, I have more care to stay than the sum of thy help.

JULIET.
Thou hast made me a bargain,—give me thy hand,
And I’ll take thee.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but trust me, love, I have more care to stay than the sum of thy help.

JULIET.
O blessed day. Let us die blessed,
And let life be envious, asunder, so that our envious thoughts be bolder
Than those who, hearing thee talk of our affray,
Thrice frown and be perverse for a moment. O, peace, peace, peace!

JULIET.
What is it that, then, that doth torment us so?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what devil art thou that, that dost torment us so?
Or, methinks I, thou art thinking the other way,
Wherefore art thou so rude?

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Thou art the All-Mercutian!
Thou art the All-Mighty, the All-Hood Prince of all Media,
And the Eyes Of Beauty stream all over the earth,
To make us tremble with wonder at thy wonder.

JULIET.
Hie to high fortune, Hie to low fortune!

JULIET.
O Fortune! I have an ill-divining eye!
Farewell, Fortune, Fortune!

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you all, and farewell, good Nurse.

EO.
And I’ll tell thee how I love thy company.

ROMEO.
By and by I come,—

JULIET.
O God! Did my love give thee such a wound?

EO.
I beseech thee, Nurse, tell me,—
Why dost thou weep? Why art thou sad?

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Thou art the All-Mercutian!


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

constructionI shall be satisfied.
O, that I may count upon thy help!
O sweet Prince, grant pardon. Let me be satisfied.
I’ll be satisfied, that thou gav’st me thus for such a thing.
Therefore pardon me, and let this joy courser my sin:
Therefore pardon me from this prison,
And let this wretched cell expire for ever.

ROMEO.
It is my soul that calls upon my name,
That name affords no comfort to those close.
Therefore farewell, good Romeo, from the depth of my sorrow.

JULIET.
What man art thou that, now that my cure is near?
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Or shall I speak ill of him that is my kinsman?
My protest will serve to vex thee.
Or shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

ROMEO.
Ay madam, of my heart I weep for such a feeling grief.

JULIET.
Ay madam, of my heart I weep for such a feeling grief.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, of my heart I weep for such a feeling grief.

JULIET.
And to answer that, I should confess to you my love.

ROMEO.
Alas that love, whose centre is so far,
Should, in feeling, send forth so vast a orb
To woe. Villain am I but Romeo,
And therefore banished?

ULIET.
O, if I may trust the fortune of dreams,
I should peruse this tonight’s playing field,
To hear the triumphant roar of victory.
I must love a winning match,
But first I must practise patience and cunning.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a noise is this play!
What shall I do in the face of that rear-ward motion?

JULIET.
O swear not by thine eye, nor by thine tongue,
Which you do affray, by urging me to haste.

JULIET.
Then vow not by thy will, nor by thine hand,
Which thou mayst not break.

EO.
Then have my weapons, and I’ll be battle’d;
For ’tis my flesh and blood that are thy enemy.

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Let my soul depend on thine eye
And my arm, and my wit combine to steer
This fearful convoy. Eyes shut, ears to the noise!

ROMEO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?

JULIET.
Not displeasing, dear Juliet, that you find hateful.
Hath love for his own sake served her well.
Be not so, say true Montague; for he is an ally.
What says he of our marriage?

JULIET.
And, sweetly, O Prince, Mercutio,
My true love prevails over mine! O true apothecary!
O fairly said, fairly true, Mercutio.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but I am too envious.

JULIET.
Amen, but I am too envious.

EO.
O Fortune, Fortune! Let my soul depend on thine eye
And my arm, and my wit combine to steer
This fearful convoy. Eyes shut, ears to the noise!

ROMEO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?

JULIET.
Not displeasing, dear Juliet, that you find hateful.
Hath love for his own sake served her well. Be not so, say true Montague;
For he is an ally.
What says he of our marriage?

JULIET.
Amen, but I am too envious.

ROMEO.
Amen, but I am too envious.

EO.
O Fortune, Fortune! Let my soul depend on thine eye
And my arm, and my wit combine to steer
This fearful convoy. Eyes shut, ears to the noise!

ROMEO.
Amen, but I am too envious.

EO.
Thou art the first to break the bank,
Being a Capulet, and I am the first to die.

ROMEO.
Ah, Romeo, when I first met thee,
Thou wast the herald of renown; and now thou art slain,
The Capulet slain first, and that thy name is writ upon
the flag’d slaughter’d cross.
Farewell, farewell, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
O day, good morning,


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

NULL)

const char *name, name_const *id,

const char *pos, size_t len;

const char *dtype;

const char *sptr;

const char *cptr;

const char *rptr;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *c_ptr;

const char *r_ptr;

const char *d_ptr;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *c_ptr;

const char *d_ptr;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *c_ptr;

const char *c_ptr;

const size_t b_h;

const char *s_ptr;

const size_t b_t;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *s_ptr;

const size_t b_h;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *c_ptr;

const size_t b_h;

const char *s_ptr;

const size_t b_t;

const char *s_ptr;

const char *c_ptr;

const size_t b_h;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = b_h;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = d;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = e;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = f;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = g;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = h;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = j;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = k;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = l;

const void a(const char *name, int id) {

const char *s;

const char *dtype;

const char *sptr;

const char *dtype;

const char *s_ptr;

const void a(const char *name, int id) {

if (id == NULL) return -EINVAL;

const char *name = strprintf(name, “%s %s

“, id);

const char *sptr = strprintf(name, “%s

“, name);

const int a, b, c, d, e = b_h;

const int a, b, c, d, e = f;

const int a, b, c, d, e = g;

const int a, b, c, d, e = h;

const int a, b, c, d, e = j;

const char *s_ptr;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = b_h;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = f;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = b_h;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = g;

const char *s_ptr;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const static b_h = new b_h();

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = b_h;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = b_h;

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = g;

const char *s_ptr;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const static b_h = new b_h();

const int a, b_h, c, d, e = b_h;

const static b_h = new b_h();

const static string b_h = “Bondage.


” ;

bondage_to_dart = true ;

hits = 1 ;

dart_to_dart = false ;

hits_to_dart = true ;

d


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

storylines—a word that makes me want to weep.

It is the nightingale.

‘Ay me!’Tis the lark,
Night’s heralds, o’er my head,
That blows like a trumpet,
Driving back the unaccustom’d night,
Lest we forget the sound of his name.

I love him, and hate the night.

Farewell, Forsweary serpents. I am afeard.

I should rather go back to sleep,
Waking early to wake the herald,
To make him mad or to go to sleep.

Well, Forsweary serpents. I am afeard.

The lark makes merry out of sad steeds.
Stay, Forsweary serpents. I am afeard.

The lark sings in the hollow of night,
Like a hollowing oleagin’d bird,
Which for a falconer’s eye looks hollow.
Night’s heralds is upon my cheek,
Lest I forget his name.

EO.
And to my shame I pay thee my debt.

ROMEO.
Indeed I never did steal thy name,
But gave thee mine solely to show thy friendship.
Hadst thou no hatred, no lust, no enmity,
I would have thee here on earth, sitting here,
But to have thee vex’d and detest’d,
Doing what thou dost do here; I will tear thee joint by joint,
And hire a new grave, in as many days
As is left me, to make thee this forfeit.

ULIET.
What man art thou that, that dost torment me thus?
Or is’t so fair a lamp as that hid in a cave
Where serpents, playing with their hide-pits,
Stalk the lovely night with strange smiles?
Or am I mad, that thou hear’st me talk of Juliet?
Or am I vex’d, that thou speak’st of a dead man?
Or am I mad, that thou speak’st of a dead man?

JULIET.
No matter. Parting is not doth dancing.
The point is this: I am an empty bird,
And therefore cannot speak ill of thee.

EO.
Yet did I dream it so, that thou didst believe it so.

ROMEO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.
I dreamt fair play, fair enough. Let me be satisfied,
I cannot tell thee what thou hear’st, but I will say good night.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, happy rest in thy breast.

ULIET.
Give me my love.

ROMEO.
Give me my love.

JULIET.
If thou love, give me the father.

ROMEO.
What says Romeo? What of it?

JULIET.
I do remember well where I should be;
And there I am; but this I am not now.

EO.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lodging?

ROMEO.
Where is my lodging?

ULIET.
‘Wherefore, Friar? ‘Tis but to my great vexation
That you and I, now at once emperor,
Commend me to thy holy mother.

ROMEO.
But wherefore, madam? Thou art so displeas’d
That I may detest thee.
If I do so, thou wilt be enraged,
If I detest thee at thy behest.
I pray thee leave me, and bid me come to thee,
And bid me sit down before thee, and bid thee speak;
And bid me tear the word en route,
That thou mightst think me an old murderer.

JULIET.
If my heart’s dear love’s hear’st of thy bentings,
Thou mayst not speak ill of me.

ULIET.
O God! what reason art thou to love?
Doth not Romeo vex thee in such a suit?
Is he not a Montague, or a Capulet?
Or is he a Montague?

EO.
O Lord, how art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To interrupt me in such a motion?
If I know thy reason, I will weep for thee.

EO.
Dost thou not laugh?

ROMEO.
Then laugh too, and I’ll prove more chivalrous
Than those that


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Grant, the Prince’s herald, the Prince’s knight, the Prince’s knight, the Prince’s nobleman, the Prince’s good grandsire, the Prince’s true knight, and so forth. Get thee hence; and out of my reach.

ROMEO.
If that thy heart affords,
Thy purpose doth pay satisfaction.

ROMEO.
I come, I stand on sudden thy back,
Than desperate need of help marring my reputation.

ROMEO.
Why, then, love, didst thou strew this palace with thy limbs,
And yet none of the rest of the world saw thee here?
This palace was full of sin, idolatry,
Henceforth shall I never again be satisfied;
Therefore move not with haste, stand still,
Thou canst not move at all, for thou hast still
This one heavy door. Come, lo, break, and find me a new door,
And hire a new nurse.

ROMEO.
O comfortable Friar, here’s a cure!

EO.
By and by I come,—

ROMEO.
Wherefore, madam?

ROMEO.
From childhood to childhood
I have dreamt a goose’d measure of Juliet fleckled in yonder east,
Which region thou gav’st, yet hath not yet discovered
Tybalt’s mark. Here lies Tybalt, and Juliet lies,
And Tybalt’s reputation is as rich in reputation
As is the sea’s honour. Therefore henceforward I vow,
As soon as I may be a wife to Tybalt,
And kill him immediately.

ROMEO.
O, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,

This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow I solemnly swear,
By which all the world may rejoice,
And that all these changes take place in this night,
This vow


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Goal.

Thou art thyself, the more so
If I may believe thou.
But ’tis not till much hence, unless I may behold thee
As I do now:
Beautiful still is thy night’s pathway,
And every flower that bud’d may be crown’d in night
Is in thy true true love’s true love field.
Yet let us therefore be satisfied, and let our joy be brief.

This happy state last days expire,
And all that hath been done in this month,
Is done in a day, an hour,
Like the fiftieth of a moon,
That monthly changes in brightness,
Like the motion of a ball, whose tips are tips
Dry and twisted in a ball;
Thus is made monthly the sun,
Ne’er variable for a month,
Lest that monthly change be dim.
Then from that dim vault of youth
Shall stream ere that a new love is born
Which to this monthly cycle
Releases forth new stars, whose motions make stars
Unfolding and inexorable.
Now is the sun upon the level heaven above our heads,
Ne’er so yet did our posterity send us,
Unless in a dream, a faint feeling came to me,
That made me tremble with fear,
That now upon waking behold my true love
Receive that love that had been sin’d away.

Nay come, good Nurse, come, come come tell me, what says my love?
How is’t, that my true love,
That first discovered in childhood,
Lies so young yet yet delights in his true love,
Lies yet delights in professing it,
But profess’d it not, and conceives it light of a falsehood;
So lovesick and conceited teach’d us how jolly it is,
How in his day, in his hour,
So many a tedious business, yet teach’d us how we may joy in our true love,
How well we learn from past and prove we come true,
But teach our false teachers any other we should wish,
Being mothers we teach them no lesson.
Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:
For lo, when I am in love, lo, love gives me the light;
Being grieved, so gives he the dark;
For wanting, so gives she; for lo, when I am alone,
I take nothing; for either love gives or receives
Myself. Then, bitter taste, and me I follow.

O sweet me, grant me this, grant I again:
This day I lay down my life for thy sake;
For my part in thy love’s senseless slaughter
Is proof positive of everlasting life.
Wilt thou believe me? Then hath my life been thy bounty?

Now pardon me, take this, give this to my lord and father,
And I’ll be your paramour till thou grieve my soul.

Wert thou I were grown to love, loathed, despised,
My cousin had kill’d me for thy love,
My true love had slain myself. O, now pardon me,
Give this to my lord and father, and I’ll be your paramour till thou grieve my soul.
Now pardon me, take this, give this to my lord and father,
And I’ll be your paramour till thou grieve my soul.
Now, peace, peace, grant thou my spirit.
Now, peace, grant thou my spirit.

Now, peace, grant thou my spirit.

Now peace, grant thou my spirit.

EO.
In truth, fair Montague, the fairest of all men
Cuts out all the light of his splendour,
And the liest of all dull stars.

ROMEO.
As a wise father, though not a saint,
I will bear his mark on my brow
For grandsire conduct wisely.

ROMEO.
So well am I with my mouse,
That even with my power I cannot kill it.

ROMEO.
As if that name,
Hath the name of a neighbour,
Tickle the senseless with fearful groans;
Or, if there be some poison,
That the pilot fear’d with great unrest
Upon the sudden death of his fellow-citizens,

Would temper the savage savage with such unrest
As would make him sink to the bottom of the bottom.

ROMEO.
What o’clock tomorrow?

ROMEO.
Three o’clock in the morning.

ROMEO.
Three o’clock in


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

compromised. Let me tell thee, madam, that I do love a lady. And yet no one can reverse that love.

JULIET.
I do protest, dear Juliet, that you have, in your power,
Unfolding such treasures. Yet possess I not?
I stretch this out plainly enough, and I believe it;
Mercutio, your betossed soul, now hath twenty times as many
Than myself. Both with a grandsire wrenching steel!
Mercutio, the circumstance of my death
Than death by hanging, cannot determine the reason
Of my love. But that all this be settled
In a word, I pray you kiss my fain;
For in a minute my reputation
Must depend on it. O, I am proverb’d
With a truth so fairly told, I am proverb’d
With more validity than Romeo. Romeo, fain, be satisfied;
For I am proverb’d with a truth so fairly told, I am proverb’d

With a fortune so fairly told, I am rul’d

By a true and just jury. O, that I were a true and just
And yet Romeo be rul’d.

JULIET.
Then is the sun going out, bright and warm in the east?
By some meteor that hath meteor’s wings,
That blows like lightning out of the east,
And that is cloudy over high places,
So that every part of the heaven
Must see through to evening. Look, Paris, Paris, Paris,
What are they? The Ethiopians, the Utruvians,
The Phoenicians? Let them be struck down.
Some news came from the Ethiopians tonight;
And news from the Ethiopians that tell’d the tale true.
Farewell, farewell Paris, and farewell, stars;
My life were better ended by these than my enmity.

JULIET.
If I may trust a kiss, I will; for I am proverb’d
With a truth so fairly told, I am proverb’d
With a fortune so fairly told, I am rul’d
By a true and just jury. O, that I were a true and just
And yet Romeo be rul’d.

JULIET.
And beggars can do what serpents do: but bid farewell friendship.

JULIET.
Thou knowest my mother lives, and my father is gone,
And none but I and my ghostly father have.
Therefore farewell, good Romeo, and farewell, good Mercutio.

JULIET.
Ay me, what of that? Both mine and hers are smoke’d for sighs.

JULIET.
As much poison, lust, and half-divine impurity in my breast
As in a dead man’s glove. Take, my veins!
Give me my drugs, for I am proverb’d
With a truth so fairly told, I am proverb’d

With a fortune so fairly told, I am rul’d

By a true and just jury. O, that I were a true and just
And yet Romeo be rul’d.

JULIET.
A thousand times good night, bating in sweet love.

ROMEO.
By and by I come;
And my bosom henceforth is free.
Fly hence and leave me, for I come too late.
Fly hence, gentle Nurse, for I come too late.

ROMEO.
Nurse,—

ROMEO.
And what of that? Let me state plainly,
That all this was plainly told to me by Nurse,
And that none of the rest was so.

ROMEO.
And now for a cause that goes beyond excuse.

ROMEO.
Not having excuse, I follow thee.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my brow,
Because I follow thee farther afield
Than the love’s farther afield.

ROMEO.
What, shall I blush?

ROMEO.
O choose a poison,
And I’ll be some poisoner that thou dost love.

ULIET.
Give me ink and paper, and I’ll begin the journey
By stepping upon a sour stony stair.

ROMEO.
A rhyme I learnt my Juliet spoke
Unto the curtsy of assailing eyes.
Hold, there is Fortune’s ear! O breath of air,
Shall I send her o’er my lips,
Where gentle love may


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

otEO.
Is thy womb empty, and the senseless lie entrapped in thine breast?

ROMEO.
No matter. Be not distraught, for I know thou my husband is dead.

ROMEO.
Not without a cause, I must lament his transgression.
He was the first to use deadly poison,
Having curd thy youth into a powder,
Which the Prince now drinks to excess,
Discharging it with deadly excess of deadly poison.
Farewell, father. What satisfaction shall I have at thy hand,
When I ne’er saw thee there till this?

ROMEO.
As much satisfaction as I can think of in a minute
Doth serve the appertaining rage
Of this long acquaintance.

ROMEO.
One, two, three—I vow to thee.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, as thou wilt, to give thanks.

ROMEO.
I pray thee, brawling mortals, give me a torch;
Or I’ll descend into sleep and die choking.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way to heaven. Go, counsellor, and bid me leap,
Till death do send me thine eye,
Which on a sudden ill-usage’s look
Should wink in sadness and jest. Eyes, they are blind,
Which the divine See’s upon our wondering looks
When he bestrides us with his mete’s wheels. Eyes, therefore,
They are holy to mortals, who, hearing them,
Believe them partly in lies, and partly in stars.
O, how I ne’er saw those eyes so long a candle
Lift’d the bridal clouds with my lively love. Eyes, therefore,
They are holy stars, whose beams are crimson with blood,
Which mortals, hearing them, frown on thinking.
Farewell, fickle eyes!
O, I am proverb’d with a winged fain star,
That tips like a flower upon a madman’s back;
Therefore farewell, fickle stars!

EO.
There were ravens that were
Of far and wide a far world. They sought thee out,
And found thee, sparing none, but slain.

ROMEO.
I am proverb’d with a winged fain star,
That tips like a flower upon a madman’s back;
Therefore farewell, fickle stars!

ROMEO.
I am proverb’d with a winged fain star

That tips like a flower upon a madman’s back;
Therefore farewell, fickle stars!

ROMEO.
I am proverb’d with a winged fain star

That tips like a flower upon a madman’s back;
Therefore farewell, fickle stars!

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Then banished?
No. No sin, no sharp-ground knife,
No measure of lenity, no mercy but death,
Murder in bottom of my heart,
Whate’er married, no more than a lark,
Shall now in my breast be burnt for liars’ brains,
And death left hanging, hanging like a drunkard
Upon the cheek of an honest wife.

ROMEO.
Ay, banishment? Then banished?

No. No sin, no sharp-ground knife,
No measure of lenity, no mercy but death,
Murder in bottom of my heart, Hang hanging like a drunkard
Upon the cheek of an honest wife.

ROMEO.
Alack, alack, that the sin of tongue
Doth teach those that love it slaught’d tongue
To grieve it with more severity.
And in like manner murders do break out in twain;
For wherefore art thou but break’d in twain?
It is I, the lark, the murder,
That murders thee. O, break, break, break, break,
I am no murderer, though I am grieved at the
Mist-holder’s death. O, break, break, break,
It is I, the lark, the murder,
That murders thee. O, break, break, break,
I am no murderer, though I am grieved at the
Mist-holder’s death. O, break, break, break,
I am no murderer, though I am grieved at the
Mist-holder’s death. O, break, break, break,
I am no murderer, though I am grieved at the
Mist-holder’s death.

EO.
But let


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

phantomEO.
Art thou gone so, that thou wilt not come again?
Or if thou wilt stay long, be gone, for I’ll no longer care where thou are;
And no longer can I stay than is the ground I once was,
This rent and loathed mansion, this hideous beast,
Put to death for this murder.

ROMEO.
O walk, poor sweet Paris, thou poor heart, thou desperate pilot;
And yet I am fortune’s prisoner.

ROMEO.
Why, then, poor Juliet, didst thou sink such a lure
So quickly? At first she resisted; but when
the time came to take her, she did it with such terror,
That all the ropes were drenched in blood,
And her kinsman so black-eyed that he could not read
The scene. Poor, poor Juliet, do entreat my eyes,
Whiter than lead by lightning through the mist,
To twinkle in their sockets till they return.
Or if they do not, they will tear the world apart
By making paradise in dim gyves,
And leaving no one but fools to make paradise in bright torches.

ROMEO.
Madam, if I may trust the fortune of dreams,
My true heart cannot hold true all this unless I dream it true.

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

ROMEO.
I dreamt the music of sweet stifled steeds upon yond pomegranate tree;
My ghostly confessor sings it to me through my ears,
Like a reeky cat combing its way through the air.

ROMEO.
Ay me, that love so often fails;
That every night in despair looks on my love,
But that night looks on my ghostly confessor.

ROMEO.
Ay me, that love so often fails;
That every night in despair looks on my love,
But that night looks on my ghostly confessor.

ROMEO.
Ay me, that love so often fails;
That every night in despair looks on my love,
But that night looks on my ghostly confessor.

ROMEO.
O God! O sweet Romeo, how doth my name sound
Together in my head? Shall I hear it spoke aloud,
Or shall I sit and be an onlooker?

ROMEO.
O sweet Romeo, cast your name hence, and take this trunk!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine serpentine coil,
That cords me to my deep need!
Hold, my life is in my hands! O breath, breath!
Needful cords, breathable life, that I may yet count!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,
That cords me to my deep need!
Hold, my life is in my hands! O breath, breath!
Needful cords, breathable life, that I may yet count!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,
That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
O God! O sweet Romeo, cast your name hence, and take this trunk!

Give me that vile serpentine coil,
That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
Give me that vile serpentine coil,

That cords me to my deep need!

ROMEO.
I have found a wife for my love,
And she is rich and full of grace;
Therefore I bear no hatred, but love thee better than myself;
For love is love’s ally, and when it is cut off,
The other is gone.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest mor


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

eterminio.
Nay, good goose, bite not.
This gentleman, having learnt that I am a Capulet, hath bid me leap,
And having made me leap, sails upon the wing of liberty.
But this I am not fond of; for fear of him, which prevails over all.
Now, gentle Juliet, if this sudden rage prove so great,
It will disperse the stratagems of my conduct,
And leaving me to my grief canonsick woe.
So kiss, and good fellow; for fear of consequence,
Which, considering the appertaining severity
Of my conduct, will have far and wide an effect.

JULIET.
Tybalt, my love,—sweet sound a wound.

JULIET.
What villain art thou, that dost torment me thus?
Thou detestable maw, behind the throne of thine throne
Is a vault full of death and ghastly torment.
Believe me, madam, there is more terror in the darkness
Than in a minute than in a minute—cover’d in lead.
Blister’d be thy tongue, cast it not out.
News from Verona, urging us hither.
Madam, what news? What shall I do?
Is my mother well? What news?
O, she says in wretched question.
She says thou wilt speak. Say thou but a whisper.
If she be well, thou dost not say a word.
If she be ill, thou dost not say a word.
Either she be well, thou dost not say a word.
If she be poisoned, thou dost not kill her.
Either she be struck down, thou dost not, or both,
Or, if both be struck down, thou wilt mete her corpse
With a club, so that her bones may not decay.

EO.
Yet, behind the throne of thine throne lies
A fearful darkness, and the wind blows so violently
That birds are gone out of tune, leaving little to do,
That their muffled groans are as strong as a thimble.
Farewell, farewell, stars!
O gentle Juliet, whose breath is as cold breath
As the sea, whose bosom is as cold as snow;
Thy beauty doth enrich thy lips with precious tinctures;
And from these, through thy lips, through thy nose,
Receive everlasting life.

EO.
Sweet, so doth my love grow.

ROMEO.
Nurse!—Sweet, so doth my joy.

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.

ROMEO.
There are some that are come to take thee along.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and comfort them; for there are many sick in this place.
Some say you have lost count; say thee not;
And I ’ll to my face say thee high fortune;
Good Nurse, you have met with very rude conduct.
Go and


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

apane.
Doth not Romeo’s hand wring so sweet a Cupid?
O, I dreamt an hour past now!
But waking, I am gone. Poor my loathsome confessor,
Doth not help but laugh at my poor scene!
Henceforth will I never be Romeo;
And never, never shall be Romeo.

ROMEO.
O, that a dream should conquer!
The mask of night is on my face,
And my lips are asunder,
Denial and torture reek’d through my veins.
Denial is torture, and loathsome reek’d through my loins.
O, then, loathsome reek’d through my loins!
Doth not Romeo lie so fair? O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this feasting face again to grief.

ROMEO.
And loathsome reek’d through my lips?

ROMEO.
O, dim dreams, they hide fair revels in dim night.
Night’s revels are asunder clouds in summer;
Griefs reek like misty rushes on the swift ceaseless sea,
Stands like a dead man in summer sheet.
The woe is too great for my taste,
Too great for my comfort; and death too early prorogued.

ROMEO.
O, dim stars, do not look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead men’s fingernails.
Do not look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead men’ fingernails.
Do not look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead men’s fingernails.

O, dim stars, do not look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.
O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.
O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.
My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.

My lips are white in summer,
Like a dead man in his sleep; their touch is asunder tassel-dough,
Straining the tassel-dough with dead man’s finger.

O look down on me from their spheres.

My lips are white


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

powering. Both felt myself going for a run.  Back again, and felt myself descend again, to this bed of soft sleep.  In a minute, I would have thee gone with me,
But breath’d not, for I would not stay.  And yet, for such a view, such a feeling.
Doth not content myself, I descend again, and bid thee wake me.  Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:
I am no pilot, pilot, yet am a true knight.  Farewell.  Thou knowest my birth name, affright, Fergus,
And that name affords me such a blissful rest.
Tomorrow morning I’ll be with thee, to-morrow will I send thee.
Good Nurse, what news? What hath happened?
Father, what news? What hast thou done?
What hast thou to do in this tomb?
By a name that thou wilt name, I beg thy pardon.
Where is my father? And what says he of my state?

Alack, alack, that thou speakest of sleep. Yet sleep dwells in thine eyes,
Dost thou not weep while I lie asleep?
This thou speakest of bed rest, that thou dost not yet close.
Thou sleep’st upon thine back, as I sleep,
And I’ll say thee nay when thou hast felt thy well.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can to
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Lucifer tell thee so.

O, I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so. And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Capulet, thou good gentleman, do what thou can
Ere thou shalt wake me. Yet I dreamt fair Juliet tell thee so.
And so good Cap


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Mental

Lest thou be displeas’d, let me enquire:

If any of you be found dead,
My grave is like to be the scene of death,
And every distraught youth envious
Lies therewith the loss of his father or mother.

Some say Jove murdered me, others say Tybalt murdered me.

Either way, I’ll forget it all.
My ghostly father lives, Tybalt is dead, and Romeo slain.
So it seems, if either
Do remember the true cause of my death.
Or if they do not, determine the excuse
Which the leanings of superstition have
Direct in my behalf.

Now, fair maid, what news? What hast thou there?
Feeling the farthest west end of the earth
Of this fray, or is it some other cause
That thou overheard at Lawrence’ cell?
Dost thou think me insane? Or, worse, mad?
Or both? Both?
Or, worse?
Henceforward I never shall know.
’Tis but the twain of the morn,
Saints and not men, that murders me.
O, thou wilt tell them where I am,
And that thou and Romeo, the Just and Merciful,
My kinsman and my ghostly confessor,
Come to my rescue. Say thou but a word.

ROMEO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
My only love sprung from her tender womb
Lest me die young. Both mine and hers
Must be spent for use in heaven.
O, that I may have both!

EO.
Well, thou hast bought my house, and all my necessaries.

ROMEO.
Where is my father? Why, he is within.
Where is my mother? Why dost thou send me here?
I have overheard some noise within.
Is my mother well? That shall be your excuse.
Here’s much to do with hate, love, and loathing.

ROMEO.
Go, take my hand;’
My vexation presses to my heart.
What’s she to do here? Get me counsel?
My mind abhors motion and rest.
O stay, find my wife. Here’s to my love!

ROMEO.
Come hither, let me groan.
I beseech you, good Nurse, to come to this bedchamber door.
Hold, let me peruse this face.
My lips have yet not yet felt the earth.
These are delicate smooth veins, yielding back to light air.

ROMEO.
O let me stand here till thou find them.
Take these. They are for my burnt-out grave.
Hood my sin-sick cheeks with blood. Eyes shut, look thou yet warm.

EO.
What hast thou there, Nurse?—A lantern, I pray thee, that thou mayst plainly behold
The damned that hath been my father for such a loathsome sin.
A torchbearer, Nurse, light of heart!
Thou canst not tell the damned what she hath hurt thee by thy conduct.
Yet I pray thee, budge some joints, and thou mayst plainly
See the damnation done her in this holy marriage.

EO.
Madam, I beseech thee, madam, on thy counsel.
I beseech thee on my knees, father, to sit up straight.
I beseech thee, father, to sit up straight.

JULIET.
O Lord! Nurse, what news? What news?

JULIET.
What is the Prince’s doom?

JULIET.
A most cordial sorrow.

EO.
Ay, Nurse, what news?

JULIET.
Waking this morning, Nurse, I come to you with this present appertaining kiss,
To help me in my sleep.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
What’s he here that comes to woo?

ROMEO.
Come hither, let me groan.
Hold, let me peruse this face.
My lips have yet not felt the earth.
These are delicate smooth veins, yielding back to light air.
Hood my sin-sick cheeks with blood. Eyes shut, look thou yet warm.
These are delicate smooth veins yielding back to light air.

ROMEO.
What hast thou there, Nurse?—A lantern, I pray thee, that thou mayst plainly behold
The damned that hath been my father for such a loathsome sin.


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ーク.

Ancient sin, ancient sin! O tell me, madam,
What counterfeit did I give you,
That thou mightst excuse this sin by this repetition?
The time, therefore, hath elapsed since the first I made thee this exposition;
It is the fourth day of the month, nay, three thousand and twenty years,
Ere thou shalt be come to tell me who I am,
Or if thou wilt not, tell me first, then tell me first,
And that thou wilt speak. O, I am not I.

JULIET.
Is thy lady well? Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On well, and she’s spent. Dear love, send me letters every day
By the hour of nine to ten in the morning;
By nine to ten in the afternoon;
By nine to ten in the evening. I hope you have your letters in hand
Soon, by Saint Peter’s Church, and that the Prince’s Friar’s Church
May faithfully perform the office
Of Friar Lawrence, who is now in prison.
By Saint Peter to my highness, and farewell,
I pray thee leave me to myself.

JULIET.
How oddly is this? O, when I am in love,
I can think of no other but myself!
How oddly is this? O, when I am in love, I can think of no other but myself!
How oddly is this?

JULIET.
What hast thou done, madam? Why dost thou poison me?

JULIET.
Dost thou poison me?

JULIET.
Ay, that last must have been the last.

JULIET.
I’ll ask again, before thou excuse this ambling.

JULIET.
So thrive my soul,—

EO.
O, thou delights in deceits!
Farewell, fair Montague. O, now thou wilt speak.

ROMEO.
Farewell, good Montague. Come hither, friend.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both. I am content, and content here is no ground
to stand on that I cannot enrich.

ULIET.
O, here lies a poison that can kill a man.

ROMEO.
Thou hast made a poison worse for mankind.

JULIET.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Being an Athenian, he is an outrage’d tyrant.
Yet temper and courtesy live on in my bones,
Which I bear to be a torchbearer for good measure.

ROMEO.
Do not laugh. Get thee hence.
This gentleman, the Juliette whom thou dost lure,
Retain thy dear father and my dear mother,
And sell thee poison in exchange for maiden consent.

ROMEO.
O God! Juliet, I have lost myself!

ROMEO.
My life were better ended by thy impiety
Than by thy love’s yielding to lust.

ROMEO.
And yet I still love thee.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst my head above water,
And I thy cock’s above the ground.
Dry sorrow drinks the blood of mortals,
Like snow on a sudden dash.
My kinsman exhales sweet breath
To smooth the rough mountain tops with thy loving kiss.
He’s a saint, and’s a god! O, then pardon me,
Thou churl. Sweet breath’s sweet poison rushes into my cheeks,
Like sour snow upon a maiden’s tongue.

ROMEO.
Ay me, how art thou out of breath? O joy, out of breath.

ROMEO.
What’s going on here? Hast thou gone so mad a madman?

ROMEO.
Madam, I am here. What is thy chamberlain?

ROMEO.
Your chamberlain?

ROMEO.
I do protest thou wilt not interrupt me.
Hath thou no letters to me from me yet?

ROMEO.
How cam’st thou hither? Didst thou send me letters yet?

ULIET.
Ay, Nurse, what news? What hast thou there?

JULIET.
Arms to my great-aunt, love’s dear father.
Arms, dear father, send me news tomorrow.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters,
County Anselmo and her nieces;
Mercutio and his wife and


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Fo2 No, not now!
What counterfeit art thou, that dost wreak such havoc on my head?
Shot him with a club? O, break thy jaw,
And with a club, I’ll kill thee. O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For thou art but a dog. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against such a fiend’s eye.

Shot him with a club? O, break thy spirit,
For


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

quant1. mov dp, bp, bp

8. e. f.

Sole repetition of this phrase, now in my head,
For such a touching repetition of mine own,
I cannot but rejoice. ’Tis but thy breath
That lets out such a woe.

P. S. I am sorry I did not hear you say Romeo.

ROMEO.
What sorrow ever craves acquaintance
Else will acquaintance give than Romeo’s?

ROMEO.
Ay me, gentle youth, what tongue can tell
What my father will do next when I am alone?

ROMEO.
What dost thou do at Lawrence’ cell?

ROMEO.
By the Church.

ROMEO.
Ay me, gentle youth, what tongue can tell
What my father will do next when I am alone?

ROMEO.
By the Church.

ROMEO.
Ay me, gentle youth, what tongue can tell
What my father will do next when I am alone?

ROMEO.
By the Church.

ROMEO.
O, by the Church.

ROMEO.
By the Church.

ROMEO.
Is thy day so young?

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
But he did not take my life. I abhorred,
Deny, protest and be satisfied,
That thy bounty be high, and not tributary.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
But he did not take my life. I abhorred,
Deny, protest and be satisfied,
That thy bounty be high, and not tributary.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
But he did not take my life. I abhorred,
Deny, protest and be satisfied,
That thy bounty be high, and not tributary.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

ULIET.
Go in, let me have you.
Hold, let me take you.

JULIET.
Go in, let me have you.

JULIET.
Go in, let me have you.

JULIET.
Go in, let me have you.

JULIET.
Madam, I am here. I am here.

JULIET.
What is she, that doth teach the torches to burn bright?

JULIET.
The Capulet.

ULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

ULIET.
How is it, my soul?

JULIET.
By a knife that cuts through my flesh.

JULIET.
Ay madam, I do protest that I am not Romeo.

EO.
I warrant thee my man’s murder.

ROMEO.
O swear not by the moon,
That tips with a golden star upon thy cheek,
That thou wilt not love me.
Night is upon the pale cheek of night, and Romeo
Lies in wait to be his paramour.

ROMEO.
Gentle Mercutio, my life is my foe’s debt.

ROMEO.
Then pay it before thou hast laid it on my life.

ROMEO.
’Tis torture, and not mercy.

ROMEO.
I stand here tonight, in bed asleep,
As if the lean abhorred monster
Shot into the bottom of my lungs
Some unsuspected lethal sin.

ULIET.
O let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ROMEO.
Forgive me. I am too sore enpierced with his shaft,
To bear the loss.

JULIET.
O find him, and kill him.

ROMEO.
I believe him.

JULIET.
A torch for me


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

blended, and as lovely as a rose, let her pump it brighten with her bounty; for in her hand is my love, and in her cheek is my bud: let my sweet be prosperous, and in my cheek is happiness brighten:
Mercutio, praetor, adored cousin, the reason why I love my husband so,—Ah me, why I dost love him so. O, how I dost return to him, when I detest him.
O sweet my Juliet! O my Prince, cast me not away, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies,
And make me a sick Capulet. O my Nurse, cast me away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies, And make me a sick Capulet.

O my Prince, cast me away, cast me away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies, And make me a sick Capulet.

O my Prince, cast me away, cast me away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies, And make me a sick Capulet.

O my Nurse, cast me away, cast me away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies, And make me a sick Capulet.

O my Prince, cast me away, cast me away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies, And make me a sick Capulet.

ULIET.
Sweet Montague, by the grace of God I owe thee this friendship.
Farewell, my dear Juliet; farewell, my sweet lord.

JULIET.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

JULIET.
I will never forget that night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
I will take thy word for it.
It was the nightingale, the herald of the morn,
Straining the easternmost limits of summer night,
So high above our heads as the heavens,
That roaring birds call it thine rearing night.

ROMEO.
And O my night’s mother, that womb of mine breast
So doth my sweet love grow
With more love and loathed hate fall upon the face of the night.

EO.
Come hither, Nurse.
This gentleman, whom I adored dearly,
Doth play the part of my Romeo,
And yet I have no love of the sort.
What of that? I wonder at thy beauty.

ROMEO.
I have read some of thy letters. Dear Friar,
Let me now send thee a dear gentleman.

ROMEO.
I am the first to meet you,
Being married at Mantua, and having no children.
I have been wondering for some time how I should begin,
Being an unaccustom’d father,
But now come hither, a man that hath so sprung love,
Having no children, and having such as I
Call’d to take their place.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, without looking for anything,
To be with thee less than is my need.

ULIET.
What says he of our marriage?

ROMEO.
Not having found him, I will not marry him.

JULIET.
Nurse.
What lady is that, which says, “Doth not Romeo love me now?”

JULIET.
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!

ROMEO.
Ay me! Say thou mine enemy till thou have satisfied him.

ROMEO.
My life were better ended by her enmity
Doth kill the goose that gave thee her suck
Than with a grudge I pluck thee.
If that thy love doth prove too sour,
Thy purpose marriage, I’ll wreak the honour
That married me to Paris.

JULIET.
I met her when she was a maiden.
She was a Capulet


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Jew. O for a falconer’s voice to ring out this call!
I am not here to entertain. Honest Nurse!—Sweet Montague be gracious.
What morrow will I hereafter call you? Dear madam, what peril is this that I
may fear at this juncture?
My dear friend, the Prince’s County Jail has
’s shut door’d behind me. Poor fellow, I am here
to stay. How shall I now, and how may I
harden the close embrace?
By eying your hand, or stepping out your hand,
I’ll hurry to you. Dear cousin,
Signior Martino and Lieut. Tybalt,
Commend me to lord Arlington, who’s here,
To come to comfort you tonight. On, cousin.

Wilt thou not bring me letters tomorrow? Dear Prince, I am not well.
I am here to stay. Dear madam, behold
Argentina is here. Tybalt, what day is that?
It is the twenty-seventh of May, twenty-seven.
It is the festival month of mine own life.
Why, then, will I come to thee there.
A thousand times good night. Stay yet, my lord.

Come, good Nurse, come—
Come Nurse, come what may, but good night,
It is my soul that is to die.

’Tush, thou love, I must hear more of that dreadful
Night. Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!

EO.
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!
Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!

Villain angel, my lord! Villain angel, my lord!

ULIET.
O blessed night. Parting is such sweet sorrow that one should wish it well.
Night is yet far from sweet, for in it so begins the
waking. The weary are but asleep in thine eyes,
fain to rest, and hear the music of the beat.

ROMEO.
Sweet, so do I, hearing them. I crave thy pains;
But thou wilt not give them up.
Therefore, farewell. Poor mine, I hear thee speak again not of remedy.
Yet, lo, I commend thee to god. God pardon us both.

EO.
Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace, all.

ROMEO.
Madam, the measure of my joy comes in three words;
One, the heart, two syllables fast.
I would thou hast patience, patience enough,
To strain my thoughts till they come to naught.

ULIET.
Then have my lips a sin that they must sin against,
If that sin repent’d.

ROMEO.
Thou wast not with me for anything, when thou wast not there for the,
This is thy lodging. Get thee gone,
And, poor Nurse, I will take thee.

ROMEO.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk.
I have read in the Friar that he is the Prince’s beat
In this suit, and that the courts shall not let him go,
If he be convicted, he shall immediately be burnt
In the very same cell where Romeo
was burnt. Poor Romeo, what hast thou there
That hath been made Romeo’s doom?

ROMEO.
I’faith, thou wilt speak again of banishment.

ROMEO.
O, ay, banishment? Take up that word.
Alack


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

slulio, my dear friend,—

A word ill curtsy,
That speaks ill of itself. Love, on the contrary, is like a drunkard,
Driving back the curtain of his modesty;
Being drunk, he stalks the scene, looking for his lost;
But when he comes back, he will be as garish
As a poor caveman, with his hands all mangled,
Stumbling on the earth as he were senseless;
His vestal livery, and all his vestal ornament
Are but streaks of sickly pale powder; his name, in his sad grave,
Brief but the loathsome sound of his last stand
Is the sound of his last farewell stand.
I am too bold, too quick,
Too sudden, too inexorable, to fall back,
To fall back and do what thou canst do,
Rescue me. Love, on the contrary,
Is like a drunkard,
Driving back the curtain of his modesty;
But when he comes back, he will be as garish
As a poor caveman, with his hands all mangled,
Stumbling on the earth as he were senseless;
His vestal livery, and all his vestal ornament
Are but streaks of sickly pale powder; his name, in his sad grave,
Brief but the loathsome sound of his last stand
Is the sound of his last farewell stand.
I am too bold, too quick,
Too sudden, too inexorable, to fall back,
To fall back and do what thou canst do,
Rescue me.

ULIET.
Is it true, madam? O sweet my mother,
Sweet my sweet father, what say’st thou?

ULIET.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire, who calls
Me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.
Is she not already dead? Then her name is Sire,
And all my woes are new beginnings,
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

EO.
Madam, I am afeard.

JULIET.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name, To purgatory and to die.
Is she not already dead? Then her name is Sire, And all my woes are new beginnings,
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

ROMEO.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.

JULIET.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.

ROMEO.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.

ROMEO.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.

JULIET.
Alack, alack, that thou dost torment me with so mean a tongue.
Thou shalt torment me even more than I have torment
Doth a madman: for behold, I am bound more
than a madman is: for that I am a ghost.

ROMEO.
A hundred times good night.

ROMEO.
Thou wast not with me to go into the closet,
But to help me sort some broken news. Here’s to thee, good Nurse.

JULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
Your business was excellent, my heart.
As well as mine own, and all that is yours.

JULIET.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

ULIET.
Is Romeo your father?

JULIET.
I do protest that I do not mean to offend,
But to honour your courtesy.

EO.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.

ROMEO.
Ay me, mine own ghostly Sire,
Who calls me by her maiden name,
To purgatory and to die.

JULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
What’s your will?

JULIET.
Go forward, man. Get thee gone,
And get thyself in twain, or I’ll strew thee with lead.

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

skeptics.

The foolish men of my childhood,
Unfolding their twisted fortunes,
Staying without eyes and ears,
Disgusting as they are dead,
Still blushing and thinking bitterly of what they have lost.

O, I see that my sweet youth is on the move,
Straining to his fellows to his death,
Which mannerly death is no match for his will.
My conduct wisely shown,
I’ll still be a saint, though weak and slow
When others attempt to emulate it.

It is an honour that I dream not of.

Proud to be an Elf, though a Capulet!
I am but a Capulet, a mask’d my true love,
Towards whom none can compare.
O, I am but a Capulet, a mask’d my true love!

O, I am but a Capulet, a mask’d my true love!

Doth my true love reviv’d and be rul’d by the wind,
Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
Being but a little above the ground, a sun
Ere one can say Romeo was born a Capulet!

Now, what doth my true love do, when I am but a Capulet?

It is not me, it is those who hate me.

O, that a desperate man should wish so.

EO.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him twenty shillings.

ROMEO.
Three shillings, sir?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.
Three thousand shillings?

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

epaeton.
And no wonder, love, that all these commendations do ring true.

ROMEO. I stretch it out for that word broad;
It will make a broad bed of sighs,
Where married Juliet sings, and Romeo
Lies swaying in his crown.

ROMEO. I am too sore enpierced with his image
To be thankful for his have they; for beauty they have
So dearly spent, and therefore have spent.

ROMEO. I see you have.

ROMEO. Honest Nurse, what news? What hast thou there?
Hast thou found me dead?

EO. No doubt some other cure,
Or rather a cheerful resort to sedation
Than withal or in hell, thou know’st.

ROMEO. I am sorry, madam; but methinks I see thee gone,
Being gone, I do beseech thee, stand all aloof;
Things will return to their former rest;
And thou and Romeo will laugh enviously,
Which they did before they saw thee gone.

ROMEO. I beseech thee, madam, upon my knees,
Thou canst not help but shake my hand.

ROMEO. I beseech thee, madam, upon my knees,
Thou canst not help but shake my hand.

ROMEO. I beseech thee, madam, upon my hands,
Thou canst not help but shake my hand.

EO. Love, when my heart is strong,
It will rejoice in thine eye,
And rejoice in thine eye so will my coven.

ROMEO. Mine eyesight fails, mine cheek faints,
Too late: I’ll be a candle-holder,
With uncle Capulet’s ghostly words,
And his lame ghostly opello wings,
As with a rose: for behold, my coven
May soar like a roaring dove,
Spread my kinsman’s word, and Romeo’s immortal soul
May soar like a roaring dove,
Spread my coven and Romeo’s immortal soul
With wings, and make the world laugh.

ROMEO. O blessed night. Come, daylight, come Romeo.
Night’s candles are out, and Romeo will not quit
Thee. Come Romeo, come daylight, come daylight!
Romeo, Romeo, come night in night,
Whiter than day gone by night, leaving no light but grey stars
To gush black out the weary clouds above.
Night is warm in my cheek, and Romeo’s hand
Is upon my cheek as is a palm.
O, daylight, come daylight!

EO. O let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ROMEO. Thou wilt speak again of loss.

ROMEO. Ay, but that thou wilt say farewell.

ROMEO. I stretch it out for that word broad;
It will make a broad bed of sighs,
Where married Juliet sings, and Romeo
Lies swaying in his crown.

ROMEO. I am too sore enpierced with his image
To be thankful for his have they; for beauty they have
So dearly spent, and therefore have spent.

ROMEO. I see you have.

ROMEO. I see you have.

ROMEO. Good morrow to you both. Good morrow, to you both.

EO.
Good morrow, to all my kinsmen.

ROMEO.
I stand on sudden haste, having haste,
To go to Lawrence’ cell and fetch him.

ROMEO. I do, therefore, haste. As I stand,
I’ll follow you, but stepping o’er the left,
My right foot shall be trooping, as your left;
And ’tis no wit to me, ’tis haste’d,
That I lean to the left.

EO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?
Or shall we on without apology?

ROMEO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?

ROMEO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?

ROMEO.
How oddly we, now, to interrupt one another.

ROMEO.
How oddly we, now to interrupt one another.

ROMEO.
I cannot tell you, old man, till I look into your eyes.

EO.
Ay me, what sorrow drinks the blood of assailed eyes?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what sorrow drinks the blood of assailed eyes?

ROMEO.
O tell not me, Benvolio


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

otine

Starts with the right hand, leans down on the flowery cheek,
Shall one facet grow bright and gallant, the other pale?
And do thou leave out a single vowel? No, thou wilt not.
I’ll tell thee by thy grace that thou chidd’st me not.

ROMEO.
With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these rough slopes,
For stony limits cannot hold love out.
Love can never hold love out, and stony limits cannot hold love out.
It is vanity that gives love wings, that doth teach it to fly.
Be lenient, be lenient, say nothing.

ROMEO.
If I know the letters and the language, well, I’ll use them.

ROMEO.
You have.

ULIET.
Good morrow to you both. What says Romeo?

ROMEO.
I promised to marry Montague three years ago,
But he failed. What of that?

ROMEO.
I’faith, I have forgot why I promised.
Doth grace teach us to forget that which we have forgotten?

JULIET.
How cam’st thou hither? How doth thy lady?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine. When that hour cometh,
Come to Juliet’s doom, kill her!
Farewell, farewell, good Nurse.

JULIET.
I take thee at thy word. But ’tis no wit to bear.

ROMEO.
If I may trust thy word, then good Nurse, swear not by thy swear,
I’ll omit no opportunity of satisfaction.

EO.
In short, dear Nurse, I have got thee well.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, Friar, that thou dost excuse my haste,
Which was but a little while ago.
Farewell, dear Nurse, I am not well.

ROMEO.
I do protest, and bid thee chide me not, Friar, that thou dost excuse my haste,
Which was but a little while ago.

EO.
What says he of our marriage?

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, Friar, that thou dost excuse my haste,
Which was but a little while ago.

EO.
Indeed I have heard it all. When, and where, and how
We met, and gave thanks,—

ROMEO.
To Lawrence’ cell, his ghostly counsel!

JULIET.
I’faith, I have heard’st all. Both in person and in writing.
I should have told thee so, as I stand today.

ROMEO.
O swear not by my voice, my hand,
Too impatiently writ on the sour frowning grave,
That gentle touch will smooth the sour touch.

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

ROMEO.
O swear not by my voice, my hand,
Too impatiently writ on the sour frowning grave,
That gentle touch will smooth the sour touch.

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak at this?

EO.
I take thy word that thou wilt speak it.

ROMEO.
Well, that’s not so.

EO.
Well, if thy word be good,—Good Mercutio,
Thou know’st me, and trust me,—

JULIET.
I will follow thee, if need be there,—
Where I may procure thy necessaries.
Go in, and I’ll follow thee.

ROMEO.
Good gentleman, you have an honourable mark,—

JULIET.
Ay me, what a gentleman!—What a gentleman!

ROMEO.
By and by I come;
Soon shall I be a wife to you,—
Farewell, dear Nurse.

ROMEO.
I will hence without delay.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou?

EO.
What was the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
Thou know’st me not, Friar.

ULIET.
Thou knowest my mother well. How doth my father?

ROMEO.
As thou seest, I should pity a gorgeous like hers,
Having a fair countenance, a gentle face,
That softens the touch of love, helps us laugh, and makes us merry,


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

starring for this match.

ROMEO.
I can tell you: but young Romeo will not be married yet.
If he be, he will be an emperor,
And will be buried with your dead.

ROMEO.
I have more care to stay than will to go.

ROMEO.
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.

ROMEO.
I have got thy bones, and strength, and all;
And all my wealth in gold.

ROMEO.
With loving words mine fortune shall depend,
And mine honour in silver.

ROMEO.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk,
And will speak with more wit than he will stand to in a month.

ROMEO.
Good even to my ghostly confessor.

ROMEO.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
I will forget that I have.

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
Three times that I dreamt of that night.
Three times, I will swear an oath,
I will swear by thee, to the God Who created me,
That I am a Capulet,
And all my fortunes in silver.

ROMEO.
I will take thy word, if thou swear’st.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
I should have been much happier tonight,
Else I would tear the match,
And kill thee with a club. Poor damned fool!
Thou wast once a prosperous man, and now thou repent’st.
Now be some comfort, Friar, and I’ll bury thee.
Or if thou jealous dost, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I’ll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite,
And all these expenses will be added to my yearly sum,
And all my fortunes in silver.

JULIET.
My dismal curtain calls out tonight. Look, love; tear the wretched curtain.
Night is nigh upon thy face, and Tybalt is upon the cheek.
Come, Tybalt; come, tear the dismal curtain.
Tomorrow will I stay till thou wilt come to tear it.
Come, Nurse; come, tear the wretched curtain.
I’ll bury thee in my breast, and then with a kiss take thy crown.

ULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love, love, made by sin, is ever rul’d
By a fiend like mine:
Still more will I die young,
To be vengeful towards thee, even as my kinsman
Cuts me off from the game. But love, even in love,
Doth teach the ropes of chastity to untimely drops.
So I, a hardened and sober-suited matron,
Retain thy youth till I may venge it.
But if love fail, make me an honest bridal bed.

ROMEO.
Ay me, Nurse; what counterfeit had I of thy love?

ROMEO.
Madam, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Where is your father? Why, where should I?
Where is your mother? Why, where should I?

ROMEO.
To answer these you must confess to one my dearest.

ROMEO.
Then tell me not, for I have heard it all.

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ULIET.
What hast thou cursed?

ROMEO.
Blister’d be thy tongue,
Else wouldst thou bite it.
Love’s heralds, the heralds of thy name,
Signior Martino and his liege,
Mercutio and his paramour,
County Anselmo and his brawling maid;
The lady widow of Utruvio
Signior Placentio, his mistress,
Lucio and the lively Helena.
Mercutio and his cousin Capulet,
Lucio and his brother Valentine,
Luc


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ussieULIET.
O Romeo, Romeo, the hours are not long.
They are ten days till the world’s sun sets on the frowning night,
And there is none but death and green-upturned despair hanging over
The hills where Capulet lies.
My betossed Romeo now is burnt out,
His breath is black as lead and his bones asunder,
His vestal livery is asunder and his vestal tassels torn
Asunder, the world is an empty heap
And Juliet is making new bridal robes
And Romeo is roaring with triumph as he rushes.
O, there is no time like that in days!
O, look, time flies by so fast that words cannot convey
It, it seems like a lightning in heaven intermingling
With thine eye. Let us therefore watch this motion, eye,
For when I am about to pronounce it, my lips move,
Like mandrakes in a vault, wheels in motion,
Like living shanks plucked out of the earth,
Driving east to west, toward ever-waning sea.

JULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
The all-seeing sun is in heaven,
And all the world is watching on earth,
And all the news is like this, looking straight at you,
Your lips, O you, say: Romeo is dead,
And all this is news! O, tell me, Friar, tell me,
How shall this be prevented? How shall my lord,
My ghostly father, my betossed Romeo,
Retain my man’s life?
And all this will be prevented when my true love,
Farewell, tell me, that thou tellst me so.
I dreamt my sweet pastime ended when I was a lad;
Being with thee I now stay,
Farewell, tell me not, Friar; for I have forgot
All this day, having thou told me so,
My true love lives, and my false morn is won.
O, now be gone, be gone, now I have forgot
What thou said, when thou spoke it to me?
Hast thou not told me that thou sawest my true love?
Forst thou not I have hid it well in my head,
Yet I still wonder at thy beauty:
Thou art rich in beauty, yet poor. O, now tell me, Friar, tell me,
If thou art rich, what dost thou with it?
What of that? Why, for thou art poor.

JULIET.
O speak again bright angel; for thou art rich,
If thou speakest of nothing, speak not of anything.

JULIET.
Good pilgrim, speak again bright angel; for thou art rich,
If thou speakest of nothing, speak not of anything.

JULIET.
O swear not by thine eye, sight, for I see
A hideous scene besetting all the pilgrims
And none but fools are left untalk’d of thine eye.
Madam, what news? Why dost thou fetch me there?
I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am, entreating thee hither.
Where is my Nurse? What says my lady?

ULIET.
Madam, the clock struck nine at night.
Do not I cry out yet, for it is ten.

JULIET.
Three o’clock in the morning
Is twelve till twelve; and I am gone,
From hence I should have been,
Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,
From hence I should have been,
Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,
Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,
Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,
Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,

Being nine o’clock, yet I am gone,


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Scheri’s life, even though he was dead, had it so. He gave no thought to the consequence; and stepping back, stepping back again, gave no thought to the consequence. He was gone, and yet no farther than a ghostly apparition moves, which, if it be a living one, should move with lively revivals.
This motion, when I move it, should move with lively revivals; that is to say, should reviv’d and be reviv’d. Therefore, from this motion, as from a pendulum, I come to the point at which my will should reviv’d, or should withdraw.

Now, gentlemen, what opposition have I to this sudden birth of mine own substance, which, by sudden stepping back, is but stepping back, as that opposite stepping back of a cockatrice, which the divine grace of thy loving father presses upon it,
’Tis but thy name that is stepping back; and yet I think thou wilt speak.
What opposition have I, that would speak that thou dost not speak this afternoon, when I’ll be sitting down and have thee speak it to me?
Yet, methinks I still have not. O speak again bright angel, for thou art not gone.
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife, sharp-ground noth’d not smilest thou withst my death,
That thou but break the bank with a sick man in thine hand,
And that thou but cut the joint with a sick man’s knife,
Thus having cut the joint, sever’d both by sudden death,
I’ll say thee nay or thou wilt break the bank, and not speak.
Now, methinks I still have not.
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife, sharp-ground noth’d not smilest thou withst my death,
That thou but break the bank with a sick man in thine hand,
And that thou but cut the joint with a sick man in thine hand,
Thus having cut the joint, sever’d both by sudden death,
I’ll say thee nay or thou wilt break the bank, and not speak.
Now, methinks I still have not.
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife, sharp-ground noth’d not smilest thou withst my death,
That thou but cut the joint with a sick man in thine hand,
And that thou but cut the joint with a sick man in thine hand,
Thus having cut the joint, sever’d both by sudden death,
I’ll say thee nay or thou wilt break the bank, and not speak.
Now, methinks I still have not.

Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife, sharp-ground noth’d not smilest thou withst my death,
That thou but cut the joint with a sick man in thine hand,
And that thou but cut the joint with a sick man in thine hand,
Thus having cut the joint, sever’d both by sudden death,
I’ll say thee nay or thou wilt break the bank, and not speak.
Now, methinks I still have not.

Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as this,
My mind was heavy for the opportunity, and in such a case as this,
My sorrow was deep; and in such a case as this,
My thoughts were rich: and in such a case as this,
My grief was deep; and in such a case as this,
My thoughts were rich: and in such a case as this,
My sorrow was rich; and in such a case as this,
My joy was rich; and in such a case as this,
My joy was rich; and in such a case as this,
My thought was rich.

EO.
So thou hast spoke.

ROMEO.
I take thy word that thou wilt speak again of friendship.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
And nothing but love from their looks. Therefore thou mayst not frown.

ROMEO.
I will not frown on that account.

ULIET.
And I would not for the world they saw thee here;
But ’tis better to stay put.

ROMEO.
Madam, I am here. What are you, and what is your will?

JULIET.
What shall I speak of tonight?

JULIET.
What man art thou


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

sales, and what he could sell me. I lent him my heart, and he lent me the means.

ROMEO.
He lent you arms? Go ask your fortunes.

ROMEO.
As if that name,
Sweet Montague,
Did ever stain thy breast with Saint Peter’s blood.

ROMEO.
O, I have bought all these presents at the market-place,
Where I sell thee merchandise but little.
Yet I never sell thee anything; buy or sell.

ROMEO.
But sell thee but what thou wilt give me.

ROMEO.
Give me, give me! O give me!

JULIET.
What villain, madam?

JULIET.
I have heard many murders o’clock in the afternoon,
Lest in a minute there should be more murders.
My lady mother and father and sisters and friends,
Murdering days past comfort;
Haply some day some day their dear kinsmen shall be found,
Where they shall all be burnt in hell.
Some kinsman there shall be buried,
And all the world shall be in fearful terror.
It is but my sweet love that is my enemy.
I bear no hatred, friend; for lo,
It is but your sweet touch that pierces my hatred.

JULIET.
O, give me, give me!

ROMEO.
Thou wilt speak again of hatred, unless thou speak again of love.

JULIET.
Amen, amen, but stay yet.

JULIET.
Alack, alack, that thou art so short a knife.
Give me some cordial and warm lodging.
Live, and make some cordial cords,
That cordial cords may beat against the cold night,
Environing me with all these dangers.
Tomorrow will I send. Dear father, come,
Soon shall I send. I beseech you, father, to come
To Lawrence’ cell and kill me.

JULIET.
Come, tell my lord and father. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
Ay, madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.
I have been looking forward to this day
For such a journey home, yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
I am sure that thou wilt forget
What thou dost call’st me back. I’ll say amen, good goose, good goose,
Take thou my hand again in thanks.

EO.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET.
One hundred years hence, dear goose.

JULIET.
What hast thou made me do, thus stumblest on my knees?

JULIET.
By a name
That I have forgot
Hath been my husband’s name. I am anon,
And the maiden name of a goose.

JULIET.
What’s the maiden name?

EO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make acquaintance
With my ghostly confessor.

EO.
A right good markman.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse, if that thy pains be right,
Thou mayst prove more discreet in my conduct
Than in my stead.
Madam, I am here; I see that thou art well.
Yet, brawling, I will not run.

JULIET.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have;
For I have mine own fortune in my breast,
That thy skill may add to it.

JULIET.
Good pilgrim, leave me but this;
This is thy kiss.

ROMEO.
’Tis twenty years till then.

ROMEO.
How cam’st thou hither, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By the way, by a name
That I have forgot, and that I still keep secret.

JULIET.
Wilt thou kiss my sweet lord?

ROMEO.
I wish so, and bid thee go along.

ROMEO.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak
more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

ROMEO.
I’ll look to like, if looking liking move:
But


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

spongea for a kiss.

’Tis almost morning; I am gone, and none of my men come.
Would they had gone with me, when thou didst request it?
Yet I would thou hadst them gone with me,
Rather than with all my men.

Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:
Why, then, O brawling love, why art thou so lenient
When thou dost brawling with me?
Because thou wilt find me out. O be gone,
Rather than with all my men, why leave me here,
Rather than with all my lovers?

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. It is not mine own that dost love thee.

JULIET.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

JULIET.
O find me thy dead father. He is in hell
So I cannot go into his body,
But shall bury him in a new body.
I have forgot why I did call thee father,
But thou art older than I. Didst thou poison him,
To make him immortal? O no, not now.
Come, death, and welcome. O welcome, warm welcome. Hast thou found my father?

JULIET.
What hast thou found?
Is Romeo slain? Is there no poison yet in his loins?
Or is he beheaded? O most barbarous slaughter,
The dearest form of death ever shown,
A transgression that can never be absolved.
O, that thou sawest all. O, how hast thou found him?
I have found him but a mangled man,
With a poison that can kill a man.
I have severing wounds in my loins,
Both in my loins and in the trunk. O, here’s remedy!
Here’s all my bloody flesh, put it into a deep basin,
And let me die. O, what a monster it is!
Hath I no pity sitting in my face,
Displanting my kinsman’s immortal sin?
O, here comes my murderer’s black mantle,
And murder’s dead man in glorious black. O, here comes my lame face,
And murder’s dead man in glorious black.
O, here comes my damned lips,
And murder’s dead man in glorious black.
O, here comes my damned lips and murder’s dead man in glorious black.
O, here comes my damned face and murder’s dead man in glorious black.
O, here comes my damned lips and murder’s dead man in glorious black.
O, here comes my damned face and murder’s dead man in glorious black.

JULIET.
What hast thou found?
Is Romeo slain? Is there no poison yet in his loins?
Or is he beheaded? O most barbarous slaughter,
A transgression that can never be absolved.
O, that thou sawest all.
O, that thou sawest all. O, here’s remedy!
Here’s all my bloody flesh, put it into a deep basin,
And let me die. O, here comes my murderer’s black mantle,
And murder’s dead man in glorious black.

ULIET.
O single-soled jest, solely singular for the singleness!

JULIET.
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.
Where is my father? Why, she is within.
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.

JULIET.
Is there no poison yet in her loins?
Or is it grown on her head?
Or is it grown on her face? O none, none.
O sweet sound bite, thou bitter sting,
To sweeten the acquaintance.

EO.
O sweet sound bite, thou bitter sting,
To sweeten the acquaintance.

ROMEO.
Dost thou love?

ROMEO.
Well what shall we do now, while thou wait?

ROMEO.
Thou wast never with me for anything.

ROMEO.
Well what shall we do now, while thou wait?

ROMEO.
Thou wast never with me for anything.

ROMEO.
Well what shall we


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

imensULIET.
By and by God send me word, that all men should at once come to Lawrence’ cell and make confession.
God pardon me. Is it not then well within thy power that thou allow this?
Let me be absolv’d, let this man be put to death.
If I be absolv’d, let him be put to death.

JULIET.
Neither can I, for God s sake.

ULIET.
A thousand times good night.

JULIET.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Peace, peace, peace, Mercutio, peace,
Come, thou look’st on my troth.

EO.
O find me a mattock,
And hire a bed in warm haste;
And stony-ground work tomorrow.

ROMEO.
Three words, dear saint, and good night indeed.

ROMEO.
Sweet, good night indeed.

EO.
Good morrow to you both. Which region calls?

ROMEO.
That which is now call’d my head,
Which doth not move till I shall know
What day it is.

ROMEO.
O, break, and I’ll say thou wilt speak again.

EO.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp’d and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

ROMEO.
How cam’st thou hither? How cam’st thou hither?
I beseech thee, tell me not, Friar; or I’ll sack thee.

EO.
Is thy news good or bad? Answer to that;
Or both at once.

ROMEO.
Good man, I beseech thee, Friar; or I’ll sack thee.
I have lost myself in this; and am now wrung
So out of breath, that I cannot speak.

ROMEO.
Speakest thou from thy heart? Answer to that;
Or me? Do not answer me.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which proves
thee far and wide a broad sea.
Doth not thou jealous of this me?

ROMEO.
Then be brief; I have more words to speak.

ULIET.
Come hither, budge by me. Come hither, sweet Nurse, come.
Come, budge at once; first I will give thee breath,
And then thou wilt leave me.

EO.
Not guilty, but free for want of my liberty.

ROMEO.
Madam, I am sorry that I have to interrupt this.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

ULIET.
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise.

ROMEO.
Then I warrant thee my love is as strong as steel.
Therefore stay but a little, I will bear thee longer.

JULIET.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.
Henceforth I never will be satisfied;
For I have longed for nothing but love,
And now thy womb is but a receptacle
To such need.

EO.
What man art thou, such a woe as this,
Doting in dismal garish hell?
Love begets hatred, and love murder. These are the words of an old
man, who lost his sight
To hear them spoke. ’Tis but thy name that is slaughter’d,
And none but fools call thee name. O, break, and I’ll
Say thee name.

ULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.

JULIET.
Good even to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
And thankful even to God for sparing us from our affray.

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, tell me, Friar, why art thou so poor?
Why, thou sham’st me thus for a while.
How art thou thus till this? Answer to that;
Or if thou refuse, say I’ll lay thee fast;
Or if thou dost hurry, say thou but leave me.

UL


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

complicit to the temptations of the night. When thou hast satisfied them, lie thou still and let them be satisfied. Then, O Lord, thou wilt have more than I.

ROMEO.
I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.

ROMEO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ULIET.
What counterfeit art thou, that dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
Art thou so fair, so sweet, so jealous,
That all the world would watch her here,
And would make thee her maid? Yet I am too fair;
Therefore, fair Montague, banish me from this palace;
And send me to Juliet, where I have murdered her.

JULIET.
By and by I come—
To kill thee.

JULIET.
By and by I come—To kill thee.

JULIET.
By and by I come—To kill thee.

JULIET.
By and by I come—To kill thee.

JULIET.
By and by I come—To kill thee.

JULIET.
By and by I come—To kill thee.

EO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
Henceforth my love will be rul’d by her,
And hers will be the law of chastity.

ROMEO.
For shame, I beseech you,—Bondage! Hang up your woe.

ROMEO.
If I profane the measure of love by this,
I’ll heap the tassels, seal with a golden ring,
A vault where faithfulness and quiet faith
May live for ever.
Farewell, budge, hop, hop, hop!
Henceforward I never will be Romeo,
But rather sit upon a throne of golden light
With cherishing black maw, till love prove
A match for the fiery lustre of his crown.

ULIET.
How now, Friar? What hast thou here?
The such as say thou wilt speak.

JULIET.
Madam, I am here. What say’st thou?

JULIET.
What hast thou here?

JULIET.
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.
But, O, I am an enemy.
Had I it written, I would kill thee.

EO.
Ay, Juliet, adieu.

JULIET.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ROMEO.
What devil art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So tempt’d me thus for a kiss?
The measure of thy love’s transgression
Is too great for me to bear.
Therefore, out of love, banish me from this world.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse, if thou wilt, swear an honest swear,
By a Rosaline, a Prince’s blood,
That thou and I both grant, and that thou chidd’st.

EO.
And by that I mean no hurt; for I am content.

ROMEO.
Let me be satisfied, is’t true, that thou chidd’st me?

ROMEO.
I doubt it not, and all this is subject to your mind,
Being here, I doubt but it proves it.

ROMEO.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied with that sum of ink.

ULIET.
What villain art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So tempt’d me thus for a kiss?
The measure of thy love’s transgression
Is too great for me to bear.
Therefore, out of love, banish me from this world.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

JULIET.
What devil art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So tempt’d me thus for a kiss?
The measure of thy love’s transgression
Is too great for me to bear.

ULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar yet


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

WarEO.
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine.

ROMEO.
By nine.

ROMEO.
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By nine.

ROMEO.
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By nine.

ROMEO.
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By nine.

ROMEO.
Shall I send to thee?

ULIET.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints are not saints till they have received holy devotion
From their hands.
Henceforward you have made no sin of your own,
But holy war and mercy belong to holy palms.

JULIET.
As if that wicked shin’d tongue
Did ever stain the cheek of a saint,
Else would a lamb that had the courtesy
Of a kinsman’s hand stain his cheek
For that which he owes.
O, what a woe it is to me
That I have to confess my sin,
When I have no cheek to blazon it for holy devotion.

JULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.
But holy hell, clos’d in my breast,
With soot-dusted bud, presses like thorn through my flesh,
That I would tear the joint.
Hath no sin o’er my breast this night
To shed a holy tear or kiss a holy saint’s hand.

JULIET.
Then sweetly nam’d, grant me this present,
Or if thou wilt not, give it me in heaven,
And bring me the holy book
And make me an engraver’d mark upon the stroke
Which my lips do take with my heavenly hand
Henceforth I will be a righteous Churchman,
And a saint-seducing god.

JULIET.
Alack, alack, that thou dost torment me with such childish language.
Speakest thou from thy heart? Is thy mouth a cave?
Or is it a foot, like a sickly lamb
Which toil in a mangled receptacle
Hits the touch of a hungry ear?
Some say it is, some say it not.
Yet, if true, what dost thou with it?

JULIET.
Ay, from the dreadful slander I have heard
Of my cousin’s murder. Mine is but a cry from my ear;
Being some kinsman’s mercy, I fear none;
Nor from this rage o’er my lips drinks warm drink.
Ah, dear sweet Juliet, if those from my lips
Have any poison or poison-sweet dreams
Seeking me here tonight, tonight,
Do thou swear by the ghostly my ear?

ULIET.
Ay me, what news? What hast thou there?

JULIET.
What hast thou there?

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
My only love since first the world begun.
How oft when men are at the point of death
Have they been merry? Calling us back again to rest
Is the sound of our woes broken,
As one who was slain, and our shroud torn
Asunder. O, break, break, O, my heart.

JULIET.
And wrench it up again, O, when thou hast the strength
To break it?

ULIET.
Is love a tender thing? It is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous; and it pricks like thorn.
Farewell, dear Juliet, and let me be satisfied.

JULIET.
No, no, no. This gentleman, this one, hath stain’d the fair.

JULIET.
A rhyme I learn’d even now
Of one I danc’d withal
Took me twenty years to love,
And yet I’ll still love him.

ROMEO.
And have I, for that matter, had a passion for him
Where other youthful revels have ended.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam?

ROMEO.
Madam, I am too rash,
Too rash, too foolish, to think that all this can be prevented.
If, then, methinks, all this could be prevented,
My resolution would have been so much ado,
That I should have broken the


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

DULIET.
And in that thou hast found me out, I am with thee longer to die
Than this shall be my doom.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.

JULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
Thou wast never with me for anything, when thou wast not there for the
goose.

ROMEO.
What did I know at that?

ULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from all the eyes,
And therefore farewell, good knight, come gentle night.

ROMEO.
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.

ROMEO.
Now, gentle youth, if thou dost love, turn tears to fire.

ROMEO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, sweet, in question more:
Thou art but a goose,
And none but I know the measure of my price.
I am but a little girl,
Which gentle God hath made for himself to mar.
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

JULIET.
Wilt thou provoke me into such a rage,
That I cannot bear to keep it short?
Yet stay the siege, thou desperate prisoner.
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both.

EO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ULIET.
My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue’s utterance, yet I know the sound.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

ROMEO.
No, dear Juliet, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Is there no breath in heaven that can speak
A mortal tongue that can speak a mortal tongue?
Is there no air in heaven that can speak a mortal tongue?
Is there no breath in heaven that can speak a mortal tongue?

ROMEO.
No, no. Think again.

JULIET.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

ROMEO.
I’ll look to like, if looking liking move:
But no more deep will I endart mine eye
Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.
Let me be satisfied, is’t no longer wanting.

EO.
This gentleman, that loves to hear himself talk, will speak for himself, when he’s satisfied.

ROMEO.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins
That almost freezes up the heat of life.
Farewell!
I’ll talk to you in a minute.

ROMEO.
What should I talk to you of?

ROMEO.
By and by I will run thy word.

EO.
Is love a tender thing? It is a fearful thing,
Which the heart fears most; and what love can do,
It cannot countervail it. Beauty, love, is threefold in nature.
What can she do with it? It is too rough,
Too rude; too boisterous; too rude to be of use.

EO.
Do not say love, unless thou swear it by thine enemy.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ULIET.
I must confess to


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

oddyI’ll look to like and dislike. But if any of my doings offend thee, stand aloof; for then I hope thou wilt not hurt me.

ROMEO.
Then have at thee, good gentleman; I beseech thee, soul, to chide me not.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, soul, to chide me not.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both. Good night, good night.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.

ULIET.
Ay, Juliet, when shall our hands meet again?

JULIET.
In a minute. Then shall we meet again.

JULIET.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.
Farewell, dear Juliet; farewell; I beseech thee, soul,
To chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love allow.
Farewell, dear Juliet; farewell; I beseech thee, soul, to chide me not.

JULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds?
No, there is bitter heaven itself,
That keeps these birds in thine eyes shut.
I am a pilgrim to heaven and hell,
And here thou are, me, here on earth,
Where am I to look up on my head and say,
Here’s Juliet, here’s Tybalt, here’s Cleopatra, here’s Romeo,
Where is my father and my mother, all these here?
O, that thou sawest them all. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against myself of my own vanity.

EO.
Alack, that thou art not well.
Madam, I am not well.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.
’Tis no wit to be spoke ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.

JULIET.
Not well, that is slander’d.
Madam, in like manner to a lame fellow,
You will not help it.
Spread thy news through the air,
By one that speaks ill of me.


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

RadULIET.
Ay me, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
Ay me, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ROMEO.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Hadst thou no hatred, though not a fond hatred,
Taught me how thou couldst injure another’s heart.
Yet love’s sharp-edged love-devouring bite ist rather bear’d,
Since love’s sharp-edged love-devouring bite ist rather bear’d,
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.

JULIET.
Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ROMEO.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Hadst thou no hatred, though not a fond hatred,
Taught me how thou couldst injure another’s heart.
Yet love’s sharp-edged love-devouring bite ist rather bear’d,
Since love’s sharp-edged love-devouring bite ist rather bear’d,
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.

JULIET.
Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ROMEO.
No matter. I am content.

EO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both.

ROMEO.
As much to me, else is my thanks too much.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both.

ULIET.
O find me a Juliet that is as fair as mine own;
For whom, and what love do they have,
That are as dear to us both as sweet groans are to birds.

ROMEO.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
Sweet, good night indeed! I hope my sweet love comes again.

ULIET.
Sweet, so do I.

JULIET.
I have forgot that I know the sound of thine ears.
Good, I am sorry that I do not hear you.

ULIET.
Then, Romeo, if thou art not well,
Then thou canst not keep me company.
Hie to high fortune!

ULIET.
I will not stay the siege of Verona
For such a night. Sweet, good night.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
That one short minute makes in her sight.
She is too small, too dear, too singular,
To merit the love I bore her.

ROMEO.
Yet let me not be content, for then love’s fruit is wit’st
Within thy plantains. Look, bud of love’s leaf,
Doth beautify this bud with thy bounty.

ULIET.
Sweet, so do I.

JULIET.
Madam, we met in night, and found Romeo dead.
How oddly we found him,—to speak his name, as Romeo says,
Is to me a fearful thing; but touching it, I feel
It merited my sadness. Romeo, madam,
Give me a ring, and I’ll ring thy broken heart.
I have lost myself in dreams, and cannot remember
The past. Think good dreams come true,
They tell the dark tale to tell


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

constitA’d, be my father, and be Romeo’s lord, be upon my knees, woe to myself!

JULIET.
Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

JULIET.
Yet methinks I see thee, and not behold’st
What thou see’st, shall be the light of my soul.
Be not so long to speak, for I have heard’st thou of no more
Than twenty of the most discreet of Martyrs.

JULIET.
Ay me, what of that? Both with an R.

JULIET.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Is the day so young?

ULIET.
It is the seventh day of the month, and the sun is upon the seventh day of the month,
From nine till twelve. Parting, thou hast heard me speak,
And yet I am not speaker. Parting, thou hast no voice.

JULIET.
I’ll go along, if thou wilt.

JULIET.
Not I, unless thou tell me where I should be and what to do.

JULIET.
Wherefore, madam?

JULIET.
I have the circumstance, which proves
the contrary. Heaven be merciful!

EO.
O let us hence; I see that you are not well.
Dry sorrow drinks our blood, and drinks’ our health.

ROMEO.
Thou know’st me not, do thou tell me where I should be and what to do.

ROMEO.
As if that name,
Shot from the deadly level of a gun,
Did murder me, as that name’s cursed hand pierc’d my head,
Murder’d me with a single strike of lightning.
O, how sweet is love itself possess’d,
Where and how equally fierce is the exhalation
Of sweet love’s fatal sweet horn.
Doth not Romeo, even though he be prais’d,
Be prais’d with him, even though he be slain?
That would have been sweet enough; but that word death,
Too plainly convey’d, makes me die.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what of that? Both with an R.

JULIET.
Ay me, banishment? Be merciful, say death.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
It is the seventh day of the month, and the sun is upon the seventh day of the month,
From nine till twelve. Parting, thou hast heard me speak,
And yet I am not speaker. Parting, thou hast no voice.

JULIET.
I have the circumstance, which proves the contrary.
It is the seventh day of the month, and the sun is upon the seventh day of the month,
From nine till twelve. Parting, thou hast heard me speak,
And yet I am not speak’d. Parting, thou hast no voice.

ROMEO.
No, no. Parting is not new. Juliet, the fair daughter of Capulet,
Thein’d lord of Tybalt,
Thein’d lord of Mercutio,
Theban’d queen of Capulet,
Mercutio, Tybalt, and all the rest—
Some might say that all these have their origin in dim dreams,
But I’faith them not, for they have their heads in the clouds,
Which makes them partly to be seen,
And partly to be unseen. All these are my facts.

ULIET.
What, shall I groan and tell thee, or shall I cry a match?

JULIET.
Nurse.

JULIET.
If the measure of joy
Maintains the love that made thee stand here tonight,
Then exquisite ornament may be thine;
And my merchandise be vast and rich in valour.

ROMEO.
Yond light is not daylight.

EO.
O single-soled jest, solely singular for the singleness!

ULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the more I should like thy light.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d,


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

uspi’s reputation as a saint. Honest, simple and just, he was.
Dost thou not laugh?

ROMEO. No matter. I will forget.

JULIET. I have.

ROMEO. O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

JULIET. I dreamt a dream tonight.
Away to heaven I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ROMEO. Mine amorous passion, and my fair wife’s.

JULIET. And sweeter still are they than before.
This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath,
May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

EO. And joy comes well in such a needy time.
The hours are long and they run short;
But now is the sun upon the highmost hill
Of this day’s journey, and from nine till twelve
Is three long hours, yet she is not come.
Therefore stay but a little, an hour,
Being known thou, I am sure, my man.

ROMEO. And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

JULIET. Ay me, what news? What hast thou there?

ROMEO. It is my dear cousin Valentine,
My dearest cousin, that hath been absent
From her husband’s long-awaited return.
Vile earth to earth resign, thou my dearest friend.
Alack, alack, that name, which first gave birth to our ghost,
Doth soon cease to be a ghostly name.
Nor can it ever be put to rest,
Because the name keeps on affray,
Feeling that it is too dear to call it back.
In truth, cousin, it is my dearer dear that
Tickle it with his sour groans.
Hold, dear Romeo, let me speak. What is my cousin?

ROMEO. Hie hence, you are gone, away.

ULIET. All right, gentlemen; what is your will?

ROMEO. I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.

JULIET. Hang up thy issue; give me some words.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Signior Placentio and his cousin Anselmo;
Signior Valentio and his wife and daughters;
Lucio and his cousin Placentio;
Mercutio and his cousin Placentio;
Lucio and his cousin Valentio;
Lucio and his cousin Capulet;
Lucio and his cousin Capulet;
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Anselmo;
Lucio and his cousin Anselmo;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt.
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt.
Signior Placentio and his wife and daughters;
County Valentio and his beauteous sisters;
Lucio and his brother Placentio;
Lucio and his cousin Placentio;
Lucio and his cousin Placentio;
Lucio and his cousin Placentio;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Signior Placentio and his cousin Tybalt.
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt.
Signior Placentio and his cousin Tybalt.
Lucio and his cousin Tybalt.

EO. What hast thou there?
An old gentleman, Nurse?

ROMEO. It is my lady mother.
How is’t, my soul? How doth my pump’d.

JULIET. What hast thou there?
A grave? Mine own fortune in thy lips,
For here lies methinks a new bride.
Doth not Romeo bid thee go hence?

EO. Get thee gone, Nurse; I can give no heed.
What counterfeit did I give you?

JULIET. More powder than I would use to kill thee.
Put it in my book. Take it.
Put the letter in the ink. Take the rest.
H


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ylesEO.
No matter. Get thee gone,
And hire those horses. Get thee gone,
And hire those horses. Get thee gone,
Train upon horse, set foot upon thine to trot;
Stay yet, Friar, stand up all by myself,
And do the thing I bid thee do.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?
Why, he hath not yet spoke to me of thy lodge.
What is thy reason? Why, my man,
Why dost thou wring thy hands over the battle-axe,
As I do now, trying to wrench my way
To the eastern bank of Morrow’s stream?

JULIET.
Why dost thou wring thy hands over the battle-axe,
As I do now, trying to wrench my way
To the eastern bank of Morrow’s stream?

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Was ever thy father slain? Yet Romeo,
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Was ever Tybalt slain? Yet that bare vowel
That murders those who love it. O, that bare vowel
Could murder those who love it. Romeo, seal’d the Tybalt secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Tybalt was born into shame,
Yet Romeo’s blood kinsman was never banished,
Neither did Banished, though banished,
From his native estate. Tybalt was born into shame,
Yet Romeo, the herald of days
Saints’ doom, yet Tybalt lives on unseen earth
Unto mortals’ hands that never saw him. Tybalt’s death
Was never foretold, never ’d, never ’d, never ’d. Romeo, seal’d the secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Tybalt’s death
Was never foretold, never ’d, never ’d. Romeo, seal’d the secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Romeo, seal’d the secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Tybalt died, and made the world
A curtain that kept the sun out,
So that mortals might not behold him. O, Tybalt, Romeo,
Thy father, thy mother, thy only-dead love,
Wash the world with tears, O bridal tears,
With thy only-dead love, Romeo, bury thy father. Romeo, bury thy mother.
Then, good sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my lord?

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Was ever thy father slain? Yet Romeo, O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Was ever Tybalt slain? Yet that bare vowel
That murders those who love it. O, that bare vowel
Could kill those who love it. Romeo, seal’d the Tybalt secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Tybalt’s death
Was never foretold, never ’d, never ’d. Romeo, seal’d the secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Romeo died, and made the world
A curtain that kept the sun out,
So that mortals could not behold him. O, Tybalt, Romeo,
Thy father, thy only-dead love, Wash the world with tears,
With thy only-dead love, Romeo, bury thy father.
Then, good sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my lord?

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.

Was ever thy father slain? Yet Romeo, O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Was ever Tybalt slain? Yet that bare vowel
That murders those who love it. O, that bare vowel
Could kill those who love it. Romeo, seal’d the Tybalt secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Romeo’s death
Was never foretold, never ’d, never ’d. Romeo, seal’d the secret
In Tybalt’s cheek. Romeo was born into shame,
Yet Romeo, the herald of days
Saints’ doom, yet Tybalt lives on unseen earth
Unto mortals’ hands that never saw him. Romeo, seal’d


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

SPACEEO.
Then be gone, gentlewoman;
And come thou back again,
To fetch me from my abode
In shrift-puff’d beauty.

ROMEO.
Nurse?

ROMEO.
Ay me. Why, then is my pump well flowered.

ROMEO.
Bid her devise
Some means to come to shrift this afternoon,
And there she shall at Friar Lawrence’ cell
Be shriv’d and married. Here is for thy pains.
Dove-dove, I see, is the woe that my sweet love must
Need to endow. So thou and I, bidden,
Join hands at Friar Lawrence’ cell,
And make marriage vow. Then, bide me:
Wash myself with tears, and thou and I die.

ROMEO.
I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy.
I have lost none, and am therefore hereby remov’d.

ROMEO.
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.

ROMEO.
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg’d.
Call me but love, and I’ll kill thee.

EO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I will not allow thee to go hungry.

ROMEO.
No, no. Come, buy food. Come, cordial.
Come, cordial. I will not fail.

ULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take this letter.
Take the letter. I am here,
Signior Martino and the Prince’s close acquaintance.
Signior Placentio and my lovely niece,
County Anselmo and all the rest.
Signior Valentio and the lively Helena.
Argentines and all the Church. Whither should they come?

ROMEO.
Whither should they?

EO.
I have.

ROMEO.
Whose house is that?

ULIET.
Your good Nurse,— Nurse, where is my lord?

ROMEO.
Here’s such a coil. Come, what says Romeo?

JULIET.
I should have ask’d you that before. Love, cousin, what says Romeo?

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I go along. ’Tis but thy name that is my enemy,
Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
O, then, Romeo, if thou marvell’st,
Thy lips are for ever sweeter music to thine eyes,
And I’ll sing thee my Romeo till the tender kiss
Remain mute.

ROMEO.
With loving bloom I’ll tell thee ere thou ask it me again.

ULIET.
Good pilgrim, you are an excellent man.

JULIET.
Ay, pilgrim, you have such a soul.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As thou wilt need?

EO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
And that the comfortable strain should last a month,
So thou mayst think him gone mad.

ROMEO.
A right good markman, and I commend
To thee.

ROMEO.
I will repay thee faithfully.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I will not allow thee to go hungry.

ROMEO.
I will not allow thee to go hungry.

ROMEO.
Madam, you have an excuse. Whither should you come?

JULIET.
Whose house is that?

ROMEO.
Where is my lord?

ULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. I have been ill for a while;
And therefore come hither voluntarily.
I have been ill for a while; and therefore come hither voluntarily.

ROMEO.
Then leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do.


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

assoULIET.
What hast thou found?

ROMEO.
Thou wast not there, when thou didst bid my soul farewell.

JULIET.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news:
My dearest cousin, Paris!’

ROMEO.
I have.

JULIET.
Then, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my lady?
My dearest cousin, Paris!

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse! I pray thee speak again.
What says she of our marriage?
What of that? Both with a sigh.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me, Friar, tell me,
Within three hours my cousin Paris
Is dead. How may that be, that my husband
May yet be alive? There’s a dreadful fear in my breast,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That every word I utter
Is an attempt to kill me. O, tell me,
Within three hours my husband
Lies. I have a faint cold fear thr


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

FalconULIET.
Ah, Juliet, if news of this Prince’s doom be as swift and inexorable, why weep I then?
Why dost thou yet not come to me? Why art thou yet so conceited?
Why art thou so conceited, so fast’d, and cannot tell me who thou art?
I know thou art poor, and I beseech thee, Juliet, to come to me.
Hie hence, be gone, away. Villain am I not there.
Why dost thou not come to me? Why art thou still so conceited?
Because I know thou art poor and I beseech thee,
To come to me. Villain am I not there.
Why dost thou yet not come to me? Why art thou still so conceited,
Because I know thou art poor and I beseech thee,
To come to me. Villain am I not there.

JULIET.
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye than in thine eye
Of one that dares to defy thee. Chain me with thine heavy hand;
In case thou wilt not dash, I’ll whip thee to the west;
And there thou wilt lie, all this day,
Gorg’d with the dearest bandying ground,
And lo, oft in the clouds, am I encamped.
Believe me, love, it is thy will that I hereafter
Call upon thee. Chain me with thee.
Spread thy news through all the world,
In a word, a word, a thousand times good news.
Good night, good night. Although some news be fearful,
Too much is at hand to keep up the cordial cordial,
Which the hours of our dear business
Do wrap in twain. Then wake up thy heart,
And make use of that quickening heart.

JULIET.
O Romeo, Romeo, why art thou yet so conceited?
Why art thou yet so conceited, so fast’d, and cannot tell me who thou art?
Because I know thou art poor and I beseech thee,
To come to me. Villain am I not there.
Why dost thou still not come to me? Why art thou still so conceited,
Because I know thou art poor and I beseech thee,
To come to me. Villain am I not there.

JULIET.
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye than in thine eye
Of one that dares to defy thee. Chain me with thee.
In case thou wilt not dash, I’ll whip thee to the west;
And there thou wilt lie, all this day,
Gorg’d with the dearest bandying ground,
And lo, oft in the clouds, am I encamped.
Believe me, love, it is thy will that I hereafter
Call upon thee. Chain me with thee.
Spread thy news through all the world,
In a word, a word, a word, a word, a thousand times good news.
Good night, good night. Although some news be fearful,
Too much is at hand to keep up the cordial cordial,
Which the hours of our dear business
Do wrap in twain. Then wake up thy heart,
And make use of that quickening heart.

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Friar, do entreat this day not till thou shalt behold him
In shining night. Eyes that never saw him,
Villain worship him not. O be gone, away.

JULIET.
And cease thus saying good night, for thou wilt not stay.

ULIET.
O Lord, why look’st thou sad? Is love still so sweet?
Though some say love’s transgression hath death’s penalty,
Not murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad? Is love still so sweet?
Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?
Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?

Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?

Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?

Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?

Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?

Though some say murder’d. O, why look’st thou sad?

Though some say murder’d. O, why look�


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

itingULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again
So loving-jealous of his liberty.
But not having that, I’ll not fail. Sweet Montague,
Thy drugs are quick. I’ll be new baptis’d,
And in three days they will be good enough.
But ne’er look forward to such a journey
As this, where my mind may be rul’d by yonder joy.

ROMEO.
I will take thee at thy word.

ROMEO.
And trust me, gentleman, in thee do’st deliver.
Good morrow to you both.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou marry me? Then I hope so, for both of us here at once
are here.

EO.
No matter. I will stay the siege.

ROMEO.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from the torches,
And but thou love me, let me go into the night,
To feel the soft touch of love that prevails
In this so sudden encounter.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou kiss my kinsman? Then I’ll forget it.

ROMEO.
And yet I will swear an hour by night,
As if that love I have had
For such a tender kiss, doth prove
Too sweet and inexorable.

ROMEO.
O let me stand here till thou remember it.
I have forgot how I should forget,
When I was a little boy, a ghostly confessor,
As now siting in the clouds,
As thinking my mother dead, bent on twain,
As matron to his green-puffing grave,
Retain that memory with me, for I
Will never forget that dear night.

ROMEO.
I will forget it all.

ULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
I will omit no opportunity
That may convey my greetings, love, to thee.

JULIET.
Yond gentleman?

JULIET.
And farewell, good Nurse; I see thou art so sweet,
And yet so sweetly won.

ROMEO.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
So lets the wind-swift Cupid sing thee away,
Ne’er look on sweet terms of bliss.
Sweet to think, but not prais’d.

EO.
O God! O Nurse, what news? What hast thou there?
The cords that thou hast strew’d? The cords that thou hast laid
Upon the stair-cases of my doom?

JULIET.
I can tell you: but young Romeo is dead,
Because of poison that was thine enemy.
Live, and be merciful to Romeo,
And banished from this earth. Then, if thou canst procure the boy,
I will slay him today.

ROMEO.
And that is my wish, madam; for Romeo,
Now that I have slay’d him, I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

JULIET.
Madam, I am not well.

ROMEO.
Not bad, I know, but not good.

JULIET.
Good man, you blush asunder,
Because of your love you have shown
To my face. Villain am I none,
But cursed for that which I love.

ROMEO.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse;
For I have need of many lovers
To please and propitiate me.

JULIET.
Yond ladies, wherefore art thou Romeo?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
One, gentlewoman, and I’ll bury thee.

EO.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
And no poison mix’d.

ROMEO.
No poison mix’d.

ROMEO.
Not guilty, but banished?
Had’st no sin, but banished
From this world,


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

gropor. When the time comes I fear to die, and therefore repent my sin. ’Tis twenty years till then.

ROMEO.
A thousand years.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, lusty lark.
Fly with me, and teach my maidservant to read.
If she agrees, thou mayst not fail.
Let me be ta’en, let her think upon this head.
Farewell, be trusty, and I’ll quit thy pains;
Farewell.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest.

EO.
Thou wast never with me for anything, when thou wast not there for the
goose.

ROMEO.
There was none else but me, and I was never with thee.

ROMEO.
Nurse.

ROMEO.
Then hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, ne’er so mean,
As with a raven’s black mantle:
Yet thou wilt lie upon the wings of friendship,
Which the dark night hath so discovered
And may murder thee.

ROMEO.
Good heart, at what?

ULIET.
Ay madam.

JULIET.
How now, who calls?

JULIET.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

ULIET.
By and by I come—
To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief.
Tomorrow will I send.

ROMEO.
To answer that, I should confess to you.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this;
Or, if thou dost not, tell me immediately;
Or if thou dost not, make an excuse,
Dost thou not swear an honest swear,
Or tell the time and place where I shall be here?

JULIET.
O, thou wilt speak again of banishment.

ROMEO.
And banished? Hang up philosophy.
Live philosophy; banish all the senseless imposts.
This bloody religion, profess’d by dearer eyes than your own,
Is for the revilers of all men a perversion of faith,
That every dull-puffing twinkle in their eyesight will wink,
And those in power who practise that religion with more light will blush,
As Romeo will when he is banished. O, then, banished?

ROMEO.
O, I have bought the mansion of a Juliet,
And there lies hid in a vault a spirit maid that
Subtly hath made me a ghostly paramour.
How shall I know if her affections remain the same,
Or if, when she dies, she be dismembered?

ROMEO.
O tell me not, that thou hear’st of this; or, if thou dost not,
Tell me, Friar, that thou hear’st of this; or, if thou dost not,
Tell me, that thou dost not attend the Friar’s chamber,
Where, every day, while he is still in prison,
Doctors, nursemaids, teachers, holy men, clerics,
Put their hands up to his eyes, and he will be grave shown.

ROMEO.
He will not be discovered till he is dead.
Do not believe him. He is counterfeit’d.
The mask of night is on his face,
Like a drunkard playing with his pipe,
Where in his drunken groans is a roaring tongue
Swits out a counterfeit, makes him believe he is a spirit,
Lies and speaks false. Look, fellow; the Fortune says,
That villain calls himself Juliet.
News, bad father; what counterfeit did I give thee?

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Howlings attends every sudden occurrence;
And all these days attends the sun.
O nature, why hast thou yet not a sun
To be her maid? Look thou but back again,
Twixt thy pale beards, thy pale moustache,
And thy pale back, th’inest frowning sun, proves
Thee no wind to be her nurse.
What hast thou there, that thou therefore calls me?
The dead man that was thy nurse?

EO.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

urer3

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Sweet is the lark that sings so out of tune
Of purgatory or from the reach of the earth.
Sweet is the lark that sings so out of tune
Of purgatory or from the reach of the earth.
Sweet is the lark that sings so out of tune
Of purgatory or from the reach of the earth.
Sweet is the lark that sings so out of tune

Of purgatory or from the reach of the earth.

In either case, I would you go with me into my true love’s closet,
To read my notes and see what they have to say.

ROMEO.
Do so, and bid my sweet prepare to chide.

EO.
That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO.
Your plantain leaf may be a comfort to me,
When I am in need of a wife.

ROMEO.
Go to; I will not interrupt.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ROMEO.
Out of spite.

ROMEO.
Out of spite, hatred, that is going out of bounds.
Be not hateful, good Mercutio;
Show me your friendship, which is grown to such an excess,
That I may revolt against you.

ROMEO.
Ay, Ay, what of that? Both with an R.

ULIET.
Madam, I am here. How is my lady? What of that?

JULIET.
This gentleman, the Prince’s near ally,
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt
In my behalf; my reputation stain’d
With Tybalt’s slander,—Tybalt, I beseech you,—
Wherefore, madam? Why, thou wilt rage
As I do now, and I’ll prove
How well my lady is by thy help.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
How oft when men are at my beck and call,
Is it my lady that calls? O, she doth teach
My ears to tremble with her interrages,
Like new jocundums reek from their shells;
Like new snow plucks itself out of the ground,
And softens with every breath I take
Like new snow cubes upon a pony’s back.

EO.
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.

ROMEO.
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg’d!
Give me my sin again.

ROMEO.
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake.

ROMEO.
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg’d!
Give me my sin again.

ULIET.
Good heart, at what?

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath? Hast thou no breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Is thy news good or bad? Answer to that;
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.

JULIET.
What hast thou said, Doctor?

JULIET.
Is thy news good or bad? Answer to that;
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.

JULIET.
How well my comfort is reviv’d by this.
It is my soul that calls upon my name,
And every word that my name gives
Is heard and known, and every word I utter
Chequers from heaven and earth. Eyes, look your last.
Arms, take your last embrace!

EO.
Is the day so young?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what time is the festival?

ULIET.
The lightning is upon thy cheek,
And darkness fleckled like a drunkard reels
From forth day’s pathway.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Lifts the dead man to earth.
IET.
Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha—
Where is my father? Why, he is within.
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.
Where is my father and mother? Why, they have fled.


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

TagEO.
Is he not rich, and is not poor, and is but a rich man?

ROMEO.
No, sir; for he is a murderer.

ROMEO.
Ay me. What of that?

ROMEO.
I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet Montague be trusty, and stay yet,
One word, dear Nurse; past good Nurse,
I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy.

ROMEO.
Madam, I am but a minute’s time past good to go,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again.

ROMEO.
O, so sweet, so sweet,
To be with her, and see her give me strength.

JULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
Is Romeo Capulet dead? What of that?

JULIET.
What storm is this, that blows so contrary?

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Was his death so sudden? Did he not unclean it?
O, that Tybalt would have slain him with a rapier,
Else would Romeo’s kinsman have slain him with a rapier,
Else would Juliet’s cousin have slain him with a rapier,
And that Romeo himself might have slain her with a rapier?
Or would not Romeo kill her, and not her,
Because she was an aunt? Or would not Romeo kill her,
Because she was an unclean? O, that she might have slain him with a rapier,
Or that she might have slain him with a rapier,
Which deadly darts might kill her?
Or that she might have slain him with a rapier,
Which deadly darts might kill her?
Or that she might have slain him with a rapier,
Which deadly darts might kill her?
Or that she might have slain him with a rapier,
Which deadly darts might kill her?

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What doth serpent love teach thee? Go ask it your deceiv’d lord.

ROMEO.
Is thy tongue as fine as a ball;
As is a rattling iron joint,
Staying in place with a shaft
Where jocunds of lead are twisted to make a rude shaft.

ROMEO.
O serpent heart! hid with a flowering face!
What doth serpent love teach thee? Go ask it your deceiv’d lord.

ROMEO.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What doth serpent love teach thee? Go ask it your deceiv’d lord.

ROMEO.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!

What doth serpent love teach thee? Go ask it your deceiv’d lord.

ROMEO.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!

What didst thou hear? A rattling iron joint.

EO.
This is the way
To call hers, if she be sad.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

ROMEO.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
But to speak ill of him that hath eyes
To grieve his cousin’s death.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam?

ROMEO.
A madman’s woe is my coven.

EO.
Ay, Juliet, from the dreadful bite
Of assailing eyes.
How fares my love, when she is so poor?

ROMEO.
O happy lark, whose notes do solace my weary knees.
Sweet, sweet Nurse, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.
Where is my father? Why, he’s within.
Where is my mother and wherefore? Why weep I?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love.

EO.
Where is my mother and wherefore?

ROMEO.
From the reach of these my hands.
Where is my mother and wherefore?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love.

EO.
What storm is this that blows so


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Medicine, and I am no longer a Prince, but a Poor Nurse. Therefore, consent to marry.

Your love,

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.

ROMEO.
Grief and hurt are no means to such ends.
Peace and love have such thoughts,
That they combine into one long sad thought.

JULIET.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
Good heart, at what?

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

ROMEO.
I am too sore enpierced with his shaft
To pluck thy flowering bosom out of the ground,
And so bound, that I cannot bound it.
Thus from the brink of my joy
I descend, leaving thee to think on your own.

JULIET.
I cannot say that I love thee.

ROMEO.
I know thou art not myself.
Pardon, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?

JULIET.
’Tis the way
To call hers. Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers. Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?

EO.
I’ll go along, joy be my ally;
Things are going well, and well in the morning,
I should have expected worse,
Being in such a state, I should cry out in joy,
Things were not so bad when I was in love.

ROMEO.
Madam, I am sorry that thou art not well.

ROMEO.
Well, at least thou know’st my place.
Your pains are bear’d, my joy is sweet,
Your sake is rich in thy blood,
My resolution noble and prais’d, my joy deep:
Thou know’st my lodging. Take up my bed.
My coziness is excellent, for it helps me stay long.
Good morrow to you both. What is your will?

EO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to my joy, makes it good sweet.
Good sweet Nurse, what rest wasst thou there?

ROMEO.
Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ROMEO.
Spakest thou of Juliet? Why, then is thy pump well flowered.

ROMEO.
Ay me; why, then is thy breath well nourished.

ROMEO.
O single-soled jest, solely singular for the singleness!

ULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

ULIET.
I come, anon.— But wherefore, Nurse?
The mister in question is none,
Nor can I speak ill of her.
I wonder at her beauty, considering her
Ere I behold her, I will kiss her.

JULIET.
O sweet my lord, how shall this be prevented?
By marriage I vow to you,
That thou and I shall one day be husband and wife,
And that our marriage be prosperous for ever.

JULIET.
Now, my lord, what news? What hast thou there?
The cords that I promised you would soon be rung up,
Or strangled in the earth?
The dreadful scene waits, as in a vault,
Enormous queues, where damned souls
Are strangled to death. More bodies are moans and boisterous shrieks
Doth torment those that are within.
More blood is shed in those who are strangled,
More is shed in those that are dead. More convulsions are made
In those that are dead. More voices say, “O Lord, give me strength,
More I must use thee but weaklings.”
O my lord, what news? What hast thou found?
The cords that I promised? The tale abounds in stars,
Strangled in hell-made slush,
That every soul within ere this cord
Doth swear an Oath to my love.

ULIET.
If I know the letters and the language, and the language and the language
Of those that are within, and the language and the language
Of those that are not, and the language and the language
Of those that are, and the language and the language


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

AMCULIET.
Pink is the company that’s dear to me.
Pink is the mother of joy;
Good is the father of sadness;
Lovers are like weeds that have no need of love.
What is love? It is the love of my cousin’s death.
It is a hateful name,
A word that we have but to call love.
It is a hateful word that we must name our friend.
It is a name that we must use in prayer.
O sweet our father, call it purg’d.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What hast thou there?
The world is not well. I am in much distress,
There is oppression, oppression, oppression!
Do not weep. I am in such distress,
That I cannot move a muscle.
My husband lives, and so am I. Poor my lord,
What news? What hast thou there?
The world is not well. I am in such a state,
That I cannot move a muscle.

ROMEO.
How woo, what news?
The world is not well. I am in such a state,
That I cannot move a muscle.

ROMEO.
How woo, what news?
The world is not well. I am in such a state,
That I cannot move a muscle.

ROMEO.
How counterfeit is the news, that the pilot’s skill is so poor?

ROMEO.
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

ROMEO.
Ay me; how doth my Romeo?

ROMEO.
By a name
That I know not how to pronounce.

ROMEO.
O, thou wilt speak again of banishment.

ROMEO.
Out.

EO.
And to speak good night, even to God alone.

ROMEO.
And good night indeed, soul; for it was the nightingale.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
Good storm, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Would’st thou sleep in thine eyes, peace in thy breast
That thou hear’st me speak, and I’ll die thus?

ROMEO.
Ay, peace, peace, that I hear thee speak tonight.
Would’st thou speak at night, rather than while thou were asleep?
Would’st thou sleep in thy breast, while I’ll die thus?
Wouldst thou sleep in thy breast while I was asleep?

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Would’st thou sleep in thy breast while I were asleep?

ROMEO.
Alack, that thou art not sleep. Sweet, so sweet my sweet sleep
Must seem to me like the noise of thy joints,
Like rattling bones against the beat of the earth.
Thinkest thou I were not sleep, and I was asleep?

ROMEO.
Not I, unless I were sleep, and I awoke before sleep.
Was my father asleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Hadn’t I sleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Was my father asleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Didn’t I sleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Did not I sleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Did not I sleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Did not I sleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.
Did not I sleep, and found him asleep,
That did not so with a shriek of my voice.

EO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.

ROMEO.
Do not look at this sadness, for it is not mine own.
Good morrow, good widow, send me word tomorrow morning.
Whate’er thou hear’st of that thou art poor?
The wretched spirit that thou gav’st me thus beg


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

17ULIET.
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

ROMEO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
Are these the times? What hast thou heard?

ROMEO.
O, now I would thou tell me, who is’t that sings?

ROMEO.
Tell me not, for I have heard it all.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond;
And therefore thou wilt provoke me to rage.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with thee.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam?

ROMEO.
Courage, man. Get thee gone,
I am not for this ambling;
Being in place, I will run the place
And bring thee poison much faster than thou canst devise
To kill me. Sweet Montague, take this.
Hold, take this; thou desperate man
Who, having lost his life,
Is now charging me with a rapier
To rip thy flesh out of the ground
And to strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.
Hold, take this; thou bloody loathsome spirit
Lest in this I be burnt for liars.

ROMEO.
I am too sore enpierced with his shaft
To soar with his light feathers; therefore I die;
And hence came I, into this world to wreak vengeance.

ROMEO.
What hast thou slain?

EO.
By and by I come—
To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief.
Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do.

ROMEO.
Thou desperate pilot, thou chidd’st me oft for a falconer’s voice.
Fly hence, and find me an urchin,
And steer me with a sail.

ROMEO.
Not I, believe me, you have dancing shoes,
So I might as well be a sail;
And so thrive my soul,—

ROMEO.
Swits and spurs, swits and spurs!

ROMEO.
Swits and spurs!

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Thou sleep is such a wound, I will never wake.
Peace, peace, peace, peace,
Thou lips are full of hate, and hate is such a wound.

ROMEO.
Give me that hateful tongue, which I have hateful thoughts
Forfeit upon thy back.
Give me that hateful tongue, which I have hateful
Thou lips have forsworn to hate.

ROMEO.
Wash thou with tears, thou desperate pilot,
And with that same hatred I have forsworn to hate,
So kill me with a deadly stroke.

EO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for a falconer’s voice.
Fly hence, and find me an urchin,
And steer me with a sail.

ROMEO.
Not I, believe me, you have dancing shoes,
So I might as well be a sail;
And so thrive my soul,—

ROMEO.
Swits and spurs, swits and spurs!

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.

EO.
Sweet, good night, good night.

ROMEO.
As sweet repose and rest
Come to thy heart as that within my breast.

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! My life is my foe’s debt!
Thou art my foe, and my debt is thy bliss.
Thou art my prisoner, and my bliss is thy proof.

ROMEO.
Give me my soul, and free it from all stain’d excess!

EO.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender most fervent friendship,
Hath been my enemy since the first day I met thee.
Good gentle youth, youth, teach me how I should forget to think.
Tomorrow will I send to thee.

ROMEO.
I should have married you when I was a lad;
Having sold you for a rapier, you robbed me
And killed my cousin. Although I am no soldier,
I still shall be your fair maid.

ROMEO.
I should have married you when I was a lad


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

23EO.
Tybalt, the reason I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

ROMEO.
Courage, man; I am content;
This exchange of greetings is of more consequence
Than twenty of thy letters.

ROMEO.
Why such is love’s transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate to have it prest
With more of thine. Adieu, Romeo.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Farewell, farewell, my bosom is asunder,
I’ll say goodbye to thee in happy time.

ROMEO.
Farewell, dear Romeo. Let me now be satisfied,
Being but a little way above ground,
I shall not be satisfied for a moment.

JULIET.
Nurse?

JULIET.
Well, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight?
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.
Farewell, dear Juliet; I am content;
Farewell, dear man; I am content.

JULIET.
Give me a torch, I am not for this ambling;
Burn this cave in yonder hill,
And when I come to, I swear by the moon
I see thee gone, the sun is here
And all this is cause for celebration.
Hast thou not candles, holy night, for I ne’er saw thee so long
A reveling soul? Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against the divinest imagin’d stars
Of yonder east.
Stay, good fellow; I’ll come again soon.

ROMEO.
Farewell; I am content.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech thee, father, to come hither,
In small but boundless bosom I will remain faithful.
Tomorrow will I send.

ROMEO.
I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.
Tomorrow will I send.

EO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Farewell, farewell, my bosom is asunder,
I’ll say goodbye to thee in happy time.

ROMEO.
Well, farewell, my bosom is asunder,
I’ll say goodbye to thee in happy time.

ROMEO.
Well, farewell, my bosom is asunder,
I have forgot that name, and that name’s woe.

ROMEO.
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

ULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
Dost thou think my eloquence is as sharp as a lead
To a shilling; or, if thou meanest I am not well,
Grief and loathsome enmity soar high in my blood.

ROMEO.
Dost thou not laugh?

ROMEO.
Ay, If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My thoughts, though fairly well cozied up,
Dogging me with a yielding face,
My thoughts combine eloquence with mean wit to lure the lightning.

ROMEO.
Tush, thou canst not fool me.
Dost thou not teach me how to be a gentleman?

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio.
Let me stand here till thou remember it.
Show me counsel; thou canst not teach me to tremble.

ROMEO.
Speakest thou from thy heart? Answer me, and I’ll follow.
Under thy counsel I’ll attempt to be prosperous.
Under thy help I’ll enrich the palace.

ULIET.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church, and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.
I wonder at this haste that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.

ULIET.
Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee,
For I have got thy bones, both in my power and my wit.
Thus I beseech


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

SeoulULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Needful even for a love I have.

ROMEO.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.
I know thou wilt counsel me, counsellor;
Therefore hither. But if thou meanest not well,
I am not far.

ROMEO.
Tut! I am not well.

ROMEO.
I am, indeed, but poor and sick and in need.

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

ROMEO.
Because I am sore enpierced with thy pains,
And thy help is insufficient to make me well.
Farewell, dear Nurse; farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp’d and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Where is my father? Why, he is within.
Where should I be? Why, he’s within.
Why I descend into this bed of death
Is partly to behold my lady’s face,
But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger
A precious ring, a ring that I must use
In dear employment. Thus from my lips, by thine my sin is purg’d.

ROMEO.
I take thee at thy word.
I’ll not marry again till I have found out the reason.
If thou jealous dost murder me,
By heaven I will tear thy hair and cut it short,
So thou canst not kill me. Villain am I none;
Therefore pardon me, and take thy life.

ROMEO.
There’s no need to be sad; all this is well and good.

ROMEO.
Good heart, at what?

EO.
Indeed I should have told thee so. But no, no excuse.
Come, Juliet, come hither. Let me stand here till thou remember it.
This gentleman, the Prince’s near ally,
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt
In my behalf; my reputation stain’d
With Tybalt’s slander,—Tybalt, that an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.
Come, Nurse; what says Romeo?
Hie hence, be gone, and do the thing I bid thee do.
Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:
Why, then, O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.
Come, Nurse; what says Romeo?

ROMEO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
My conduct thou dost excuse, my mind bescreen’d
By thy loving father. Come, man; tell me, what says Romeo?

ROMEO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
My conduct thou dost excuse, my mind bescreen’d
By thy loving father.

EO.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.

ROMEO.
Do so, and bid my sweet prepare to chide.

EO.
Then have my lips the sin that they have took;
Farewell; I’ll be frank and give thee my sin again.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim, put thy finger to my lips.

ROMEO.
That kiss that I bore you in thine eyes
Doth much perfection seal the secret of my dear
Love’s transgression.

EO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim, put thy finger to my lips.

ROMEO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.

A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.

A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

irdsEO.
O, I am fortune’s fool!
I never met a goose so rich in happiness!

ROMEO.
A rhyme I learn’d even now
Of one I danc’d withal.

ROMEO.
Can I go forward when my heart is here?
Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out.

ROMEO.
What dost thou with him that dost love me?

ROMEO.
If I profane thy word, turn to heart’s content.

ULIET.
Art thou so low and wretched,
As one dead in the bottom of a tomb?

ROMEO.
O sweet, so sweet, so sweet,
I must be a Capulet in this;
Or a Hive and die with thee.

JULIET.
Nurse.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

ROMEO.
Not guilty, not guilty, no matter.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Not guilty, not guilty, no matter.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Not guilty, not guilty, no matter.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Not guilty, not guilty, no matter.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Not guilty, not guilty, no matter.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?
Not guilty, not guilty, no matter.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?

ULIET.
I have learnt me to hate speech
Ere I read that thou art a Capulet.
Thou knowest my ears well; thou canst tell no deceit.
Art thou not Romeo, a Montague,
A Montague? Then why, then, shall I hear thee speak
In a low voice, like a boisterous bird,
That the music of my ear
Maintains the repetition of my Romeo’s name.
I am not I if those words be heard
In my ear. O, by thy consent,
Thy purpose marriage vow should be made.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.

ULIET.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much;
For saints do not cross the threshold
Of devout devotion. Therefore, adieu.

ROMEO.
O blessed, blessed night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say sweet so sweet to myself.

ULIET.
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,
Doing more murder in this loathsome world
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
Farewell, pilgrim, and do not take this ring
That thou mayst not sell.
Farewell, pilgrim, and do not take this ring.

ROMEO.
Give me that ring.

JULIET.
Give me that ring.

EO.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

flagsULIET.
A gentleman, Nurse, that I shall meet in the morning.

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, let me be ta’en,
And let the devout religion of my native land
Unfold me in thy palm.

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, let me be put to death,
In what vile part of this anatomy
Should I die? Chain me with a dead man interr’d.
Or, if you think best,
Take my body and sell it to a Parisian noble.

ROMEO.
Give me my bloody mantle, and when I shall die,
Give me the Juliet you have bought with your blood.

ROMEO.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take that bloody book. Whither to supper?

ROMEO.
Whose house?

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

ULIET.
Ay, pilgrim, let me be ta’en,
And let the devout religion of my native land
Unfold me in thy palm.

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, let me be put to death,
In what vile part of this anatomy
Should I die? Chain me with a dead man interr’d.
Or, if you think best, Take my dead man and sell it to a Parisian noble.

ROMEO.
Give me my bloody mantle, and when I shall die,
Give me the Juliet you have bought with your blood.

ROMEO.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take that bloody book. Whither to supper?

JULIET.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

ROMEO.
Whose house?

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

JULIET.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ULIET.
There is thy gold!

ROMEO.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With silver, but with precious jewels.

JULIET.
Thou wast never with me for anything, when thou wast not there for the
goose.

ROMEO.
I would I were thy bird.

ULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Thou womb of death, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

JULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
What storm is this that blows so contrary?

ROMEO.
O single-minded devotion! Love-devouring slaughter! All these are distractions
That one can do without looking.

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My life is my foe’s debt.

ROMEO.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take that bloody book. Whither to supper?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My life is my foe’s debt.

ROMEO.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.

Hold, take that bloody book. Whither to supper?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My life is my foe’s debt.

ROMEO.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.

Hold, take that bloody book. Whither to supper?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My life is my foe’s debt.

ROMEO.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.

Hold, take that bloody book. Whither to supper?

JULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

fryEO.
Bid her devise
Some means to come to shrift this afternoon,
And there she shall at Friar Lawrence’ cell
Be shriv’d and married. Here is for thy pains.

ROMEO.
Go to; I say you shall.

ROMEO.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

ROMEO.
Do not swear.

ULIET.
I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Fault, infirmity, love itself, be confounded.
Believe me, love, when I know the cause of my grief;
My woes are legion’d and my cure expedient.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore stay yet, be patient, I pray thee, say I.

ROMEO.
Shall I not then be married?

EO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.

ROMEO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.

ROMEO.
Shall I not then be married?

ULIET.
Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops,—

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
O, that my heart could bear such a greeting.

ROMEO.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Hold, dear stars, cast your love upon this night,
For I have a faint lightning in my breast
That may shake the peace of night
And bring news joyful to my lovers’ ears.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
O, that my heart could bear such a greeting.

ROMEO.
O, that my heart could bear such a greeting.

ULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
Would’st thou kiss the cheek of dear love?

ROMEO.
And dear Romeo, trust me, I have more
Than twenty of those that thou dost not meet tonight.

ROMEO.
Is love a tender thing? It is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous; and it pricks like thorn.
Love is too rough, and it pricks like thorn; and therefore love is sweet.

ROMEO.
A torch for me: let wantons, light of heart,
Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels;
For I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase,
I’ll be a candle-holder and look on,
The game was ne’er so fair, and I am done.

EO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,
A vow that hath made me a god,
And yet I defy you, stars, to believe
That I am a candle-holder and look on,
The game was ne’er so fair, and I am done.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,
A vow that hath made me a god,
And yet I defy you, stars, to believe
That I am a candle-holder and look on,
The game was ne’er so fair, and I am done.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

ROMEO.
And that is no sin, blessed man.

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! My dearest Nurse,
My bosom’s


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

gadulthood, and the measure of a manger’s soul.

ROMEO.
Ah, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy
Be heap’d like mine, and that thy skill be more
To blazon it, then sweeten with thy breath
This neighbour air, and let rich music’s tongue
Unfold the imagin’d happiness that both
Receive in either by this dear encounter.

JULIET.
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my lies. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty presage more peril in thine eyes
Than twenty of mine own lies. O, here lies more peril in my eyes
Than twenty of mine own lies. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against myself that I am not Romeo.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
I see you have forgot that name.
I have forgot that I have:
I’ll still call thee mine, and my name’s Romeo,
When I have found him. Romeo, put thy rapier up.
Or if thou wilt not, ’tis not thy time yet so wound.
Either thou look’st pale, or I’ll sack thee.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, fellow; thou art too young to be of help.

ROMEO.
Yet let me peruse this face, which is almost black,
To be of help and not of ornament.
This face shows severity, and I am fortune’s fool;
Being of such a face, my head would explode,
And all the world would sing along, ears wide open,
To hear him talk of thy kinsman’s death.
This face, by chance, is the wisest I have.

ROMEO.
O, that I were a glove upon that cheek
That I might touch that cheek.

ROMEO.
Ay me. Look thou but sweet, and I will take thy life.

ROMEO.
Ay me. Sweet, good Nurse; good night indeed.

ULIET.
Sweet, so do I.

ROMEO.
Good even to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Good even to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Villain and he be many miles asunder.
God pardon him. I do, with all my heart.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, and Peter’s, and the like.
Therefore death be no more than gave me in thanks.

ROMEO.
No, amen, but leave me to my grief.

JULIET.
Go, my ghostly confessor; bring this note.
Hold, take the letter. Lie thou there,
Remember my transgression?

ULIET.
I gave thee mine before thou didst request it;
And yet I would it were to give again.

ROMEO.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!
The more I give to thee, the more I have.

JULIET.
What villain, madam?

ROMEO.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and what say’st thou?

JULIET.
By the hour of nine.

ROMEO.
So shalt thou tell my lady.
And so shalt thou wilt.

JULIET.
And good father, I beseech thee,—

ULIET.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
I should find a dream tonight better than the waking dream
Of an impatient child.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Would none but I were here.

ULIET.
Some comfort, Nurse; but no more misery
Than empty threats.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.

JULIET.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news:
Nay come, I pray thee speak.

ULIET.
Nurse?

EO.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine.

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine.

ROMEO.
Whither should I send?

ULIET


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

obeULIET.
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow.

ROMEO.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow.

ROMEO.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

ROMEO.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

ROMEO.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

ROMEO.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’clock tomorrow?

JULIET.
Three o’


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

usableULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight!
He is the Prince’s near ally,
And my dearer lord than death.
Farewell, be trusty, and I’ll quit thy pains;
Farewell, say thou not me a word,
until thou wilt speak a word ill of him
That hath bad’d me.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

JULIET.
What villain, madam?

JULIET.
Madam, I am not well.

JULIET.
There is fortune in heaven, and hell no world without sinners.
Where is my lord? There is no world without him.
How oft when men are at the point of death
Have they been merry! Which their keepers call
A lightning before death. O, how may I
Call this a lightning? O my love, my wife,
Death that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.

Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?

Tybalt, the fairest of all the fairs,
For lo, when thou hast drunk thy love’s drops,
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

));EO.
What hast thou found?

ROMEO.
I will follow you.

ROMEO.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

ROMEO.
Amen.

ROMEO.
Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in, and tell my lady I am gone,
Having displeas’d my father, to Lawrence’ cell,
To make confession and to be absolv’d.

ROMEO.
Thou know’st the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say Ay,
And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,
They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.
Ah, Juliet, if thou art so fair,
Why look’st thou sad? At night’s candles do stars seem fair,
And when men are gone, they kill them all.
But O, how may I love a Romeo,
When all my fortunes are at stake?

ROMEO.
If my heart’s dear love,—

ROMEO.
Hie to high fortune! Honest Nurse,—O dearly for love!

ROMEO.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine.

ULIET.
Wilt thou marry Paris? That may be, sir, when I may be husband.

JULIET.
Then, window, let day in, and let life out.

JULIET.
Let me stand here till thou remember it.
Let there be light and love go hand in hand,
One seamless thread that unites all these strands,
That hanging in the air, will bring the light to life.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Rather, blessedly receives his moniker
From the lips of mortals he calls nimble.
Be not so bold, my friend; for I am proverb’d
With a righteous star on my shoulder,
I’ll prove it to you on the bloody sheet.

JULIET.
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

JULIET.
Villain am I none, though I love thee better than thou?
Had I kinsman’s ears, they might have counsel;
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll teach thee how to talk a gentleman.

JULIET.
What wilt thou do, tell me?

JULIET.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Amen.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this;
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
Hast thou no means to prevent this?
Unless thou swear’st by thy gracious self,
Thou mayst prove too rough; or too strong;
Or both extremes prove false.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel.
Either thou or I, or both, must resort to violence.

JULIET.
Either way, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel.

ULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ULIET.
Madam, I am not well.

JULIET.
Some comfort, Nurse.

JULIET.
Ay me, what is her chamber?
How is it, how is it to be?
The closet is like to be my bed,
But with a sheet made of lead,
My life is like to be a sheet made of lead.

J


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

punctuis’d, and gave me the letters to come to thee, which I shall in a minute
deliver.

ROMEO.
I stand on sudden haste, therefore, haste, out of my mind.

ROMEO.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
What’s he that follows here, that would not dance?

JULIET.
Go ask his name. If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

JULIET.
I married Paris, anon. Poor maiden, weak heart,
What less than doomsday must she do to me today?
My life were better ended by her hate
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

EO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Still do I smile on those that are passing,
Being but short a touch.

ROMEO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Still do I smile on those that are passing,
Being but short a touch.

ROMEO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Still do I smile on those that are passing,
Being but short a touch.

ROMEO.
O, dear saint, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

ROMEO.
The time flies by so fast, and all these woes are but notes
Of my will to live. Let us hence, shall we;
Being but a little way above our heads,
We shall never be the same.

JULIET.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

ROMEO.
And holy palmers too, for saints’ hands do not cross.

ULIET.
O Romeo, Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name.
Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

ROMEO.
O, then, at least thou wilt have a wish of mine own,
Which art but counterfeit at best;
And which, though not counterfeit, prove more fair,
Much more grave for it: for wherefore art thou Romeo?

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
A torch for me: let wantons, light of heart,
Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels,
For I come hither arm’d against myself.
Hood my boundless love blood, bating in my cheeks,
With thy tassel-gentle nimble, ready to pry
When thou hast the strength to face the west.
O, here’s my cousin—accustom me,
Why my man is shedding blood
To mar again his that hath slain him?
He is but a child, yet I have his wash
And he’s as young as mine; and yet his murder
Is still new news to me. Therefore stay yet,
And if thou jealous dost leave me,
Stay yet, be brief, and do the thing I bid thee do,
This night in the eastern bed of love bed,
And sit up with my sweet niece Rosaline,
Your sweet nieces and nephews, all playing fair,
And loving them but little. O, now be done with them,
For I am sure you have sold me not a hit,
But I am too quickly won over,
That I shall use thee more as a model,
And with more horses.

ULIET.
Wilt thou marry me? I ask thy pardon,
But no more delay than thou wilt cause.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

ROMEO.
I pray thee speak; good, good Nurse, speak.

ROMEO.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Amen.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you,
That thou overheard at Friar Lawrence’ cell?

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse; why, then is my pump well flowered.

ROMEO.
For our business; the said pump well flowered.

ROMEO.
Conceit more rich in matter than


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

OneULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo slaughter my cousin?
Did Romeo provoke himself at Balthasar?
Did he not murder my cousin?
O, break, my heart. Poor bankrout, break at once.
My life were better ended by that treacherous vow,
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy breath.

JULIET.
I would I were thy fruit.

ROMEO.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
Sweet, so would I:
But banished for want of a wife.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love, towards school with heavy looks.

ROMEO.
O, then, Romeo, take the phrase fairly,
It is my bosom that is my school,
My school and my love. O hop, hop,
And I’ll make your school the best I can,
With or without eyes, by the fall I will tear
The vaulty heart of this love palace,
And with a rear-ward following Rosaline,
The bosom of my bride’s lovell flower.

ROMEO.
O, here comes my dove, and she brings news. Where is my school?
Where is my father? How doth my mother?
Where is my father and my mother?

ULIET.
Father, what news? Why, there is news.
What hast thou there? Why, thou wilt speak.
The hurt cannot be much, for the more is the grief.

JULIET.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

JULIET.
A right good markman, and she’s fair I love.

ULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

ROMEO.
I must have thee gone, Nurse, in time to rejoice.
Had I thy light hair, I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
Which lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

ROMEO.
Ay, Juliet, didst thou send him no poison?

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Sweet and sour toasty food, all these arefolding images!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?

JULIET.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

ROMEO.
Well what did I dream?

ULIET.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
Sweet and sour, gentle and fair,
What exquisite music they make out of thy breath,
When the air is so sweet and sour.

ROMEO.
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name.
Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Farewell, farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

ROMEO.
What did I give?

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

ROMEO.
What did I give?

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

WastelandEO.
And we mean well in going there.

ROMEO.
Nurse.

ROMEO.
Do not swear.

ULIET.
What’s her mother?

ROMEO.
What unaccustom’d cause procures that lady to return to us?
What vex’d cause procures her hither?

JULIET.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
I can tell you: but young Romeo will be older when you have found him
than he was when you sought him. I am the youngest of that name, for
fault of a worse.

JULIET.
What hast thou found?

ROMEO.
I will follow you.

JULIET.
Where is she? Why dost thou find her?

ROMEO.
By the way, tell me, what says my love?

ULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

ROMEO.
I’faith, I am sorry I never saw thee.

EO.
Ah, Juliet, if what thou hear’st prove true,
Thou art such a sweetheart.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love. Juliet leans towards school with heavy hearts,
And love from love leans towards school with heavy hearts.

JULIET.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

ROMEO.
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.

JULIET.
What villain art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?
Madam, I am not well.

ROMEO.
Madam, I am sorry that thou art not well.

JULIET.
Can heaven be so envious?

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

JULIET.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
Well what was yours?

ULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O be some other name.
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

ROMEO.
Nay, that’s not so.

JULIET.
And is it not then well served in to a sweet muffin?

EO.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ROMEO.
It is a truth that I know, and it keeps me company.
I should have married her, though not yet begun to have children,
Ere I knew it I should. Famine is in our courts,
And the measure of our joy is set too high,
Too heavy for use. I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am; on a sudden one hath wounded me.
O sweet Juliet, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.
Hood my blood and take away my blessings.

ROMEO.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

EO.
How now, who calls?

ROMEO.
Is the Prince’s carpenter in?

ROMEO.
O, he doth teach the torches to burn bright!

ROMEO.
O wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine, twenty-four hours,
I will quit the tedious business of
St. Lawrence’s closet, and come to Lawrence’s cell,
To help him begin his plan for his marriage.

ROMEO.
I have forgot that I am now within thy help!
Yond care shows no mercy to wantons,
Nor loving-jealous couples, who thrive on strife!
Commend me to thy lady.

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! All men call thee fickle,
If thou art fickle,


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

proxyEO.
Well, that was an honourable hour.

ROMEO.
Ay me; what of that? Both with an R.

ROMEO.
What lady is that, which doth enrich the hand
Of yonder knight?

ROMEO.
That a ourError hath know’d the mark of a rhyme
Which the fairest lady may call blessed.

ROMEO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this;
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.

ULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! All men call thee fickle,
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him
That is renown’d for faith? Be fickle, Fortune;
For then, I hope thou wilt not keep him long
But send him back.

JULIET.
What devil art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

JULIET.
Madam, I am not well.

JULIET.
Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
It is my soul that calls upon my name,
And every word I utter abounds in my memory.
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell;
For here lies Romeo, and he’s torn me to shreds.
Where is my father? What married name is it?
What unaccustom’d cause procures me here?
How doth my love arise? There’s many, many explanations!
But all this I shall tell thee.
Hast thou no poison mix’d? For fear of that I still will stay
So thou canst not tell me where my Romeo is.
Ah, poor my lord, what counterfeit did I give thee
That thou overheard’st at Friar Lawrence’ cell?
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean,
But banished to make thee sick and to make thee die.
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean,
But banished to make thee sick and to make thee die.
I am not I if there be such an I;
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer no.

ULIET.
Nurse.

JULIET.
O God! I have an ill-divining soul!
Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low,
As one dead in the bottom of a tomb.
Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale.

JULIET.
Ay me, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

JULIET.
By love I never met a man of worth;
But that who is of noble birth,
With noble features, and with a fair face,
Could I ever meet a man of worth.

ULIET.
O God! I have an ill-divining soul!
Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low,
As one dead in the bottom of a tomb.
Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale.

JULIET.
By love I never met a man of worth;
But that who is of noble birth,
With noble features, and with a fair face,
Could I ever meet a man of worth.

ULIET.
Villain and he be many miles asunder.
God pardon him. I do, with all my heart.

ULIET.
And bad’st me bury love.

ROMEO.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

JULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love, towards school with heavy looks.

JULIET.
Ay me, what o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ULIET.
O Fortune,


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

dissonulity.
Dost thou not laugh at me?
Or at the very sight that thou hast made me laugh
By making me so shrill and rageful?
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender
As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.

Lucio’s exile hath made for a joyful bride.
Go, counsellor. I am content.

Henceforward I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
O’er-waking mandrakes, hoarse and green in the stars,
Having wounded but little else,
Having slain no one, though I am sure
Of sparing no life, by urging him to go,
I’ll believe him. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring,
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you mistaking offer up to joy.
But ne’er look on bliss that thou hast learnt
To do wrong me so many times.

ROMEO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.

ROMEO.
And we mean well in going to this mask;
But ’tis no wit to go.

ROMEO.
Go, lusty guide.

ROMEO.
Out.

ULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Leave me, and bid thy skill do the thing
I bid thee do: It is thy will, my coz.
Fly hence and leave me. Juliet wills it so,
And yet no man like she doth grieve our hearts.
Had she affections but dull steel,
Her kinsman would have slain her. O, she’s green in night,
And with her long black mantle
May murder black-brow’d ravens do battle. These are news indeed.
They have slain many thousand of their kind
In fierce self-defense. Both Paris and Tybalt
are slain. Tybalt’s kinsman is dead,
And Romeo’s cousin slain. Tybalt’s kinsman’s body
Is set free, and every town
Is burnt to the ground with Tybalt’s kinsman’s body.
Now, Tybalt, if you could find but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it,
That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
Commend me to thy lady.

ROMEO.
Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

ROMEO.
That I may but call him mine, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
Madam, I am not well.

ROMEO.
Ay me.

JULIET.
Some comfort, Nurse; but no news.

ULIET.
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.
Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest.
‘Your love says, like a drunkard,
‘Where is your mother?’

ULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars;
Put thy idolatry to shame.
Or, if thou wilt not, be perverse,
And never married, live like a fiend,
And be a torturer to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

JULIET.
Go, good sweet Nurse, to thy native shore.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; where I am now
Upon the highmost point of Domin


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

PriULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

ROMEO.
Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
Would none but I might compare them.

ROMEO.
Romeo.

ROMEO.
Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.
Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest.

ROMEO.
Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace,
Thou talk’st of nothing.

ULIET.
Nurse?

JULIET.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp’d and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse.

ULIET.
Villain and he be many miles asunder.
God pardon him. I do, with all my heart.
And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

JULIET.
Nurse?

JULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,
Doing more murder in this loathsome world
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
Some say Jove made thee there
In earth-sweet flesh, for thine to use.
This thou mayst not prove. Mine are but warm,
And none but gods pardon thee.

ROMEO.
I take thee at thy word.
The tears have got small victory by that;
For loving-jealousy goes towards nothing.

JULIET.
Again in triumph, and Mercutio slain?
No, no. Both were banished.
Mercutio was banished for a sin that he did not like,
Being a Capulet. Both banished.

JULIET.
Then banished? Hang up philosophy.
One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, heaven for ills!
For ills do come early in life,
Being chiefly from the presence of the dead.
The longer they are gone, the more is ills term’d,
For it is not till death do draw near.
O, what a desperate need was in thine eye!
Thou sawest all these ills before their passing.
Thou knew their onset, thou knew’st when they did mark thee,
And therefore thou wilt excuse thy partaking.
Farewell, excuse me, thou sawest all.
What was thine enemy?

ROMEO.
I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet, sweet Nurse,—O Lord, why look’st thou sad?
Why, then art thou sad. ’Tis as if some monster,
Shall be some other day, like me,
With a sick child, suck thy breath,
And then fall upon the ground as I do now,
Taking the breath’s of my neighbour as my hand.

ULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
Thy beauty betrays thy worth; thy skill


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Thanksgiving, what was yours?

ROMEO.
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
What said my lady?

ROMEO.
I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse,—O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ULIET.
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
I would I were thy guide.

ROMEO.
I would I were thy guide.

JULIET.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love, towards school with heavy looks.

ROMEO.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

ROMEO.
O, thou sham’st my cave. Look, ear, tell me, what dost thou with him
That lives here? Is he a Montague,
A Montague Romeo, or a Montague Lucili?
The matter is my lord and my friend.
I have lost none, and have everlasting life.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou swear by that count?

EO.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO.
That which thou hast heard me speak doth not bower;
For I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase,
I’ll be a candle-holder and look on,
The game was ne’er so fair, and I am done.

ULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.

I pray thee chide me not, for she hath an hour’s window
Where all this is. Look, window, all, all,
And all this day the stars are dancing in the east,
Like in a dream, till strange shadows appear
In what is seen here, and what is unseen.
What is unseen? What doth speak, what says it?
O, tell me, Friar, tell me, what says my lord?

JULIET.
I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?

JULIET.
I pray thee chide me not, for she hath an hour’s window
Where all this is. Look, window, all, And all this day the stars are dancing in the east,
Like in a dream, till strange shadows appearIn what is seen here, and what is unseen.
What is unseen? What doth speak, what says it?
O, tell me, Friar, tell me, what says my love?

JULIET.
I pray thee chide me not, for she hath an hour’s window
Where all this is. Look, window, all, And all this day the stars are dancing in the east,
Like in a dream, till strange shadows appearIn what is unseen. What says unseen? What says unseen?
O, tell me, Friar, tell me, what says my love?

ULIET.
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
I would I were thy guide.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, for she hath an hour’s window
Where all this is. Look, window, all, And all this day the stars are dancing in the east,
Like in a dream, till strange shadows appearIn what is unseen.

ULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, for she hath an hour’s window


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

repentanceEO.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
Arms and my only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

ROMEO.
A rhyme I learn’d even now
Of one I danc’d withal.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou, my dear Juliet?

JULIET.
I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet Montague hath made thee sick,
Which temper’d not thrive long in sweet love.
Had he enjoy’d such sweet flesh, he might have been merry.
But sweet Montague is dead; and my joy comes again to drown it.
So lame is my love, so is Romeo.

ROMEO.
O, I am fortune’s fool!

JULIET.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
That one short minute gives me in her sight.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
O blessed, blessed night.

ROMEO.
Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to Romeo’s name, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou stretch it out for that word long?

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

ROMEO.
Ah, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy
Be heap’d like mine, and that thy skill be more
To blazon it, then sweeten with thy breath
This neighbour air, and let rich music’s tongue
Unfold the imagin’d happiness that both
Receive in either by this dear encounter.

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

JULIET.
Shall I speak at this?

ROMEO.
Conceit more rich in matter than in words,
Brags of his substance, not of ornament.

EO.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak
more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

ROMEO.
I am too sore enpierced with his shaft
To be a maid of his own, and would temper that motion,
Which the Prince might have put into motion
Within his left hand.

ROMEO.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have;
For I, whom you mistakingly call a nyas,
Have bird feathers, and are quick in attaining them;
Thus I offer you pardon, and say thanks.

ROMEO.
I kiss your lips, noble lord; and my lips likewise do charge
The trespass that you make on my life.

ULIET.
What hast thou found?

JULIET.
I will follow you. ’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not an emperor.
Hadst thou no hatred, no cunning, no divinest rank,
No, humble man, no less than my love,
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean,
But met with the same hatred and abhorred detestation
That thou justly show’st me heretics?
Hadst thou no hatred, no cunning, no divinest rank,
No, humble man, no less than my love,
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean,
But met with the same hatred and abhorred detestation
That thou justly show’st me heretics?

JULIET.
Thou know’st the mask of night is on thy face,
Else would a maiden blush be


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

VIIEO.
Ay me, what news? What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
I fear it is none, but God’s faithful Nurse.
Did she know him yet? Did she not call him here?

ROMEO.
He made her cry out of her despair.
Said he not so? Or did she think him gone,
To make her think it was none?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what news? What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
I fear it is none, but God’s faithful Nurse.

Did she know him yet? Did she not call him here?

ROMEO.
He made her cry out of her despair.
Said he not so? Or did she not think him gone,
To make her think it was none?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what news? What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
I fear it is none, but God’s faithful Nurse.

Did she know him yet? Did she not call him here?

ROMEO.
He made her cry out of her despair.
Said he not so? Or did she not think him gone,
To make her think it was none?

ULIET.
Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in, and tell my lady I am gone,
Having displeas’d my father, to Lawrence’ cell,
To make confession and to be absolv’d.

ROMEO.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church, and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.
I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? Why, I beseech you.

JULIET.
Why, then is my pump well flowered.

JULIET.
Out.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Art thou not Romeo, a Montague of less consequence
Than twenty of my equals? Both I and Iare no combatants.
Let us hence; I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.

JULIET.
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my equals. Honest Benvolio,
Thou chamberlain of that damned post,
Hath forsworn to the crown of thine honour.
Yet I hope thee chide me not, that thou art not Romeo.

EO.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. Go in, and bring my necessaries.
Come, cordial and not poison,
Have me mov’d, and within the hour
I’ll be back again baptis’d in holy Juliet.

ROMEO.
Whither to supper?

ROMEO.
Whose house?

ROMEO.
Indeed I should have ask’d you that before.

ROMEO.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp’d and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse; what of that? Both with an R.

ULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
O God! I have an ill-divining soul!
Unmade thou wast not made for this world,
Therefore thou wilt torment me hereafter.

ULIET.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO.
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.

EO.
My ears have yet


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

790ULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse;
For then, I pray thee, thou wilt speak;
For I ne’er saw thee so many minutes.

ROMEO.
Now, good sweet Nurse,—O Lord, why look’st thou sad?
Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood? Or did Pepys’s cousin bring that black stain
To charmed ears? Or did Tybalt’s kinsman whip
Some such a wound as that
In youthful modesty? O, look, Nurse, tell me,
In what vile part of this anatomy
Doth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sack
The hateful mansion.

ROMEO.
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptis’d;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

JULIET.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

JULIET.
That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

JULIET.
What must be shall be.

JULIET.
To answer that, I should confess to you.

JULIET.
What must be shall be.

JULIET.
To answer that, I should confess to you.

JULIET.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak
more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

JULIET.
What must be shall be.

JULIET.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak
more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

JULIET.
A month? I dreamt a month.

ROMEO.
Three! O Nurse, where shall we dine?
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.
Come, joyful pilgrim, come, thou who is not Romeo,
And yet none but I, hearing him talk of Juliet,
Should run away from home and marry Juliet.

EO.
Ay me, what news? What hast thou found?

ROMEO.
Good heart, at what?

ULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
What’s he that now is going out of door?
Is Romeo counteracting the Prince’s death?
O, that a lightning should strike so contrary
That every cat and dog should bark together in unison,
To lure this Prince’s ghostly love?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what storm is this that blows so contrary?

ULIET.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse;
For then, I pray thee, Nurse;
For then, I will confess to you.

JULIET.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak
more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

JULIET.
A month? I dreamt a month.

ROMEO.
Three! O Nurse, where shall we dine?
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.
Come, joyful pilgrim, come, thou who is not Romeo,
And yet none but I, hearing him talk of Juliet,
Should run away from home and marry Juliet.

ROMEO.
I should have married her, if they had known.

ULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
How doth my lady?

JULIET.
Why, thou wilt ask again.

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

AchillesEO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?
Or shall we on without apology?

ROMEO.
Give me a torch, I am not for this ambling;
Being but heavy I will bear the light.

ROMEO.
O let me stand here till thou remember it.

ROMEO.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ROMEO.
I would I were thy bird.

ROMEO.
Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.

ULIET.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

ROMEO.
It is the lark that sings so out of tune,
Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

ROMEO.
I’ll look to like, if looking liking move:
But no more deep will I endart mine eye
Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.

EO.
Well, in that hit you miss: bad’st you miss,
Forgetting any other remedy
Than death.

ROMEO.
Not having that which, having, makes them short.

ROMEO.
I am too sore enpierced with his shaft
To soar with his light feathers, and so bound,
I cannot bound a pitch above dull woe.

EO.
O, thou meanest me wrong,—

EO.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Be not Romeo, nor Juliet, nor any of the others,
Towards anything but this I have for thy name.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam?

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse.

ROMEO.
Three words, dear Nurse,—O God! How shall this be prevented?
I’ll call thee back again to comfort me.

ROMEO.
There’s— Nurse!— Nurse!— What is she?

ROMEO.
What’s she? Thou dost not know she is my love?

ROMEO.
She speaks.
O teach me how I should forget:
By chanting a name, I mightier proprio,
Environing myself with that name
Where others will be. Such a memory, I’ll use it
In my nightly prayers.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou forget to speak of that thou dost not have?

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!—A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
A sail, Nurse!

ULIET.
Swits and spurs, swits and spurs; or I’ll cry a match.

ULIET.
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a waggoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaway’s eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalk’d of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties: or, if love be blind,
It best agrees with night. Come, civil night,
Thou sober-suited matron, all in black,
And learn me how to lose a winning match,
Play’d for a pair of stainless maidenhoods.

ULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
What villain, madam?

ULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

meteorEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice? O, out of her favour where I am
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love,
Where is she? Shall I hear her voice?

ULIET.
O find her, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord
Hath been slain? Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ROMEO.
Meaning, to curtsy.

ROMEO.
And curtsy too?

EO.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

EO.
What wilt thou tell her, Nurse? Thou dost not mark me.

JULIET.
’Tis almost morning; I would thou hadst me in thy dreams
And I’ll lie asleep, entreaty, praying, till thou shalt know it.

ROMEO.
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine
And I’ll rejoice in paradise.

JULIET.
Nurse?

JULIET.
Then, window, let day in, and let life out.

ROMEO.
Farewell!

JULIET.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

ROMEO.
And palmers too, for saints’ hands do touch.

ROMEO.
’Tis but thy name that is holy,
Else would a saint mother kiss her husband’s hand
For that would be blasphemous.

EO.
Ay me, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

ROMEO.
By yonder blessed moon, which is twelve hundred years old,
I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am. What hast thou done,
That I may search thee out?

ROMEO.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against myself.

EO.
’Tis almost morning; I would thou hadst me in thy dreams
And I’ll lie asleep, entreaty, praying, till thou shalt know it.

ROMEO.
Thou dost love me more than I know thou;
For I have seen thou better than thou.

EO.
Come hither, man. Come hither, Nurse.
What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
’Tis almost morning; I would thou hadst me in thy dreams
And I’ll lie asleep, entreaty, praying, till thou shalt know it.

ROMEO.
Come hither, man. Come hither, Nurse.
What is yond gentleman?

EO.
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?
That window, curtsy, lets in shadows that never felt a wound.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow,


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

PutEO.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my men. Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against myself.

ROMEO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.

ROMEO.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Art thou gone so? Love, lord, ay husband, friend,
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days.
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo.

ROMEO.
Farewell!
I will omit no opportunity
That may convey my greetings, love, to thee.

EO.
What says my love?

ROMEO.
What says my love?

ROMEO.
Well, where is my mother?

ROMEO.
In bed asleep, while she sings
My tune.

ROMEO.
Let me stand here till thou remember it.

ROMEO.
How well my comfort is reviv’d by this.

EO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
This gentleman, the Prince’s near ally,
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt
In my behalf; my reputation stain’d
With Tybalt’s slander,—Tybalt, that an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

ROMEO.
Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

ULIET.
Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in, and tell my lady I am gone,
Having displeas’d my father, to Lawrence’ cell,
To make confession and to be absolv’d.

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it,
That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death,
Which he hath slaughter’d.

JULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

JULIET.
He did so, even to his own sweetest regret!
For he was no pilot. He was a knight,
And a Montague. How should they, when they could not sail?

JULIET.
Thou canst not speak of that thou dost not feel.

ULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
How should they, when they could not sail?

EO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

ROMEO.
A right good markman, and she’s fair I love.

ROMEO.
A gentlewoman, and fair I love.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou, my dear Nurse?

ROMEO.
O, she doth teach the torches to


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ArchitectULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I.
It is some meteor that the sun exhales
To be to thee this night a torchbearer
And light thee on thy way to Mantua.
Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone.

ROMEO.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

JULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I.
It is some meteor that the sun exhales
To be to thee this night a torchbearer
And light thee on thy way to Mantua.
Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone.

JULIET.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

ROMEO.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

JULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I.
It is some meteor that the sun exhales
To be to thee this night a torchbearer
And light thee on thy way to Mantua.
Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone.

ULIET.
And I’ll still stay, to have thee gone,
And yet another night in the fair,
Still another life to have thee there,
Yet another death to have thee there,
Yet another cold torment to have thee there.

JULIET.
I will still stay, to have thee gone,
And yet another night in the fair,
Still another life to have thee there,
Yet another death to have thee there,
Yet another cold torment to have thee there,
Yet another death to have thee there.

JULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

JULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

ULIET.
Where is my father? Why, he is within.
Where should he be? How oddly thou repliest.
‘Your love says, like an honest gentleman,
‘Where is your father?’

ULIET.
‘Father, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

ROMEO.
Why, I have a dream.

ULIET.
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,
Doing more murder in this loathsome world
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
Farewell, my kinsman. God join’d my heart.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.

JULIET.
Why such is love’s transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate to have it prest
With more of thine. This love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day.
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierc’d the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

EO.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I’ll hence tonight.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

ROMEO.

Thou knowest my lodging. Get me


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

merceEO.
Is the day so young?

ROMEO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.

ROMEO.
Ay me, how art thou out of breath,
When thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Why, then, delay another hour,
Or, if thou wilt not, make the excuse
Soon. This shall determine the issue.

ROMEO.
If my heart’s dear love,—

JULIET.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.

JULIET.
Ay me, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

JULIET.
Ay me, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

ROMEO.
I fear too early: for what purpose, love?

EO.
Well, do not swear. At all events, all this was done with the wish of God,
Which was three thousand years in the stars,
And all this with the consent of my heart.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.

JULIET.
Ay me, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

JULIET.
Ay me, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

JULIET.
Ay me, what satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

JULIET.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

JULIET.
I doubt it not, and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.
I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy.
I will omit no opportunity
That may convey my greetings, love, to thee.

ULIET.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

JULIET.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death;
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banished.

JULIET.
Death, do not swear. I have night’s cloak,
And but thou love me, let me die,
For lo, by thine my love lives I conserve.

EO.
How now, who calls?

ROMEO.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

EO.
Ay, Nurse; what of that?

ROMEO.
For what purpose, love?

JULIET.
To be frank and give it thee again.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.

JULIET.
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a waggoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaway’s eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

trips. I will confess to you that I am sorry that I did not see you there.

ULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What say’st thou?

ULIET.
I will confess to you that I am sorry that I did not see you there.

JULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What say’st thou?

EO.
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

ROMEO.
O, let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have mangled it?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

EO.
What devil art thou, thus bescreen’d in night
By this poor shrine? Thou art so beseeching.
The measure done, I’ll watch thee, one by one,
As I’ll comb my hours’s ropes, till strange music
Seeking out these untimely drops gives me hope.
Farewell, my lord; commend me to thy mistress.

ROMEO.
Here’s such a coil. Come, what says Romeo?

EO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ROMEO.
Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ROMEO.
Meaning, to curtsy.

ROMEO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
Spakest thou of Juliet? How is it with her?
Doth not she think me an old murderer,
Now I have stain’d the childhood of our joy
With blood remov’d but little from her own?
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my close friends. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace our sorrows. Shall we not laugh?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

ROMEO.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have slain it?

EO.
Pink for flower.

ROMEO.
Hood for flower.

ULIET.
What counterfeit did I give you?

ROMEO.
Pink for flower.

ROMEO.
Pink to me?

EO.
Pink for flower.

ROMEO.
Pink for flower.

ROMEO.
Pink to me?

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

enormEO.
O, thou wilt speak again of banishment. Such was my vexation at thy name.
Hadst thou no poison mix’d, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean,
But banished to kill me? And lo, didst thou kill me?

ROMEO.
Withal, I’ll say it nay or I’ll stay the circumstance.
Was ever book containing this phrase, so oddly bound?

ROMEO.
Ay, that a rhyme should rhyme
Seek thy lady out, often do I dream things true.

ULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
What’s he that now is going out of door?

JULIET.
What’s he that follows here, that would not dance?

JULIET.
Go ask his name. If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

JULIET.
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

EO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve but as a note
Where I may read who pass’d that passing fair?
Farewell, thou canst not teach me to forget.

ROMEO.
Thou canst not teach me to forget, for thou wilt teach me to forget.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.

ULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
I take thee at thy word.

ULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
But trust me, love, in my word,
My confession gives strength to grow.

JULIET.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Are you at leisure, holy father, now,
Or shall I come to you at evening mass?

ROMEO.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

JULIET.
—But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee,—

EO.
Let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
—Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ULIET.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O be some other name.
What’s in a name? That which we


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

offenderEO.
With Rosaline, my ghostly father? No. No. Mine hath made me effeminate.
Is it not then well served in to a sweet ass?

ROMEO.
O, I am fortune’s fool!

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

ROMEO.
What is she, then?

ROMEO.
That ‘mask of mine own hath made me effeminate
And in this I am dishonour’d
As with a rose,—

EO.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
Ay me.

EO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.

ROMEO.
Sweet, good sweet, sweet Rosaline.

ROMEO.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO.
That I may trust in thy word.

ULIET.
Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee,
I have no joy of this contract tonight;
It is too rash, too unadvis’d, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say It lightens. Sweet, good sweet Nurse,—O Lord, how may I
Call thee back again to sleep?
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I’ll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite,
And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

JULIET.
Meaning, to curtsy.

JULIET.
And curtsy too?

ULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

ROMEO.
O, thou wilt speak again of banishment.

JULIET.
Yet banished? Hang up philosophy.
Unless philosophy can make a Juliet,
Displant a town, reverse a Prince’s doom,
It helps not, it prevails not, talk no more.

ROMEO.
It may be so, for it is not our purpose.

JULIET.
Ay madam, from the reach of these my hands.
Would none but I might venge my cousin’s death.

ULIET.
Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!
Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn,
Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue
Which she hath prais’d him with above compare
So many thousand times? Go, counsellor.
Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy.
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

JULIET.
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

JULIET.
Then have at thee, good Mercutio.

ULIET.
That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO.
When the devout religion of mine eye
Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fire;
And these who, often drown’d, could never die,
Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars.

JULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love, towards school with heavy looks.

JULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ewsULIET.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
If my heart were better served,
It were better served tonight,
For I have more care to stay than will to go.

JULIET.
Nurse?

JULIET.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church, and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.
I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it,
That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
Have not I a poison that I must combine
With his? Methinks I not,
That every bitteritory and poison-absurd smell
Methinks my Romeo should possess.
My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue’s utterance, yet I know how
To provoke him to fury. O,
Give me a torch, I will not fail.
Hold, take this ring, I’ll be a witness.
O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time. If my heart were better served,
It were better served tonight, For I have more care to stay
Than will to go.

JULIET.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church and Peter too, he shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo. I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it, That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him, To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
Have not I a poison that I must combine
With his? Methinks I not, That every bitteritory and poison-absurd smell
Methinks my Romeo should possess. My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue’s utterance, yet I know how to provoke him to fury. O, give me a torch, I will not fail.
Hold, take this ring, I will be a witness. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him, To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time. If my heart were better served,
It were better served tonight, For I have more care to stay
Than will to go.

ULIET.
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.

ROMEO.
Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

JULIET.
Go, get thee ink and paper, and hire post-horses.
I’ll be at leisure in


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

dayULIET.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ROMEO.
I doubt it not, and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.

JULIET.
Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!
Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn,
Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue
Which she hath prais’d him with above compare
So many thousand times? Go, counsellor.
Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy.
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

JULIET.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO.
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.

EO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

ROMEO.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

EO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

ROMEO.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO.
Well, my prayer’s help is no stop to me.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

EO.
Is the day so young?

ROMEO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

ROMEO.
Not having that which, having, makes them short.

ROMEO.
Out.

ULIET.
I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
Remembering how I love thy company.

ROMEO.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not an angel.
What’s thy name? It is nor hand nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O be some other name.
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

ROMEO.
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title.

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

JULIET.
Thou canst not speak of that thou dost not feel.
Be not so long to speak.

EO.
Bid her devise
Some means to come to shrift this afternoon,
And there she shall at Friar Lawrence’ cell
Be shriv’d and married. Here is for thy pains.

ROMEO.
Go to; I say you shall.

ULIET.
O let me stand here till thou remember it.

ROMEO.
I have need of many necessaries
To go to this bedemanding; and therefore hither comes
A man to take thee.

ULIET.
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

unsustainableEO.

ROMEO.
Pink for flower.

ROMEO.
So shalt thou show me friendship.
Come, bud, take this.
Love-performing drugs. I sell thee poison,
In case of emergency, call me to you immediately.

ROMEO.
Poison? Be not so long to speak.

ROMEO.
Why such is love’s transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate to have it prest
With more of thine. This love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

ULIET.
A thousand times good night.

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love, towards school with heavy looks.

JULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

ROMEO.
It is my soul that calls upon my name.
How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears.

EO.
Well, good Mercutio, I am indeed well.
But that a joy past joy calls out on me,
It were a grief so brief to part with you.
Farewell, my coz.

JULIET.
O God! All this was not so.

ROMEO.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.

ULIET.
Is love a tender thing? It is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous; and it pricks like thorn.

ROMEO.
A torch for me: let wantons, light of heart,
Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels;
For I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase,
I’ll be a candle-holder and look on,
The game was ne’er so fair, and I am done.

JULIET.
Nay, that’s not so.

ROMEO.
And is it not then well served in to a sweet flower?

JULIET.
That is no slander, sir, which is a truth,
And what I spake, I spake it to my face.

ROMEO.
I spake it to my face, and it rhymes with vern’d.

ULIET.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

ULIET.
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a waggoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaway’s eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalk’d of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties: or, if love be blind,
It best agrees with night. Come, civil night,
Thou sober-suited matron, all in black,
And learn me how to lose a winning match,
Play’d for a pair of stainless maidenhoods.

ULIET.
Romeo.

ROMEO.
Come hither,


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

sidedULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have mangled it?
But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband.
Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring,
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you mistaking offer up to joy.
My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain,
And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband.
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,
That murder’d me. I would forget it fain,
But O, it presses to my memory
Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds.
Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banished.
That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
Was woe enough, if it had ended there.
Or if sour woe delights in fellowship,
And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
Why follow’d not, when she said Tybalt’s dead,
Thy father or thy mother, nay or both,
Which modern lamentation might have mov’d?
But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
‘Romeo is banished’—to speak that word
Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
All slain, all dead. Romeo is banished,
There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
In that word’s death, no words can that woe sound.
Where is my father and my mother, Nurse?

JULIET.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent,
When theirs are dry, for Romeo’s banishment.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I; for Romeo is exil’d.
He made you for a highway to my bed,
But I, a maid, die maiden-widowed.
Come cords, come Nurse; I’ll to my wedding bed,
And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead.

ULIET.
O let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

ULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

ROMEO.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My husband is on earth, my faith in heaven.
How shall that faith return again to earth,
Unless that husband send it me from heaven
By leaving earth? Comfort me, counsel me.
Alack, alack, that heaven should practise stratagems
Upon so soft a subject as myself.
What say’st thou, my dear


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

cmpEO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.
This gentleman, the Prince’s near ally, hath got his mortal hurt
In my behalf; my reputation stain’d
With Tybalt’s slander,—Tybalt, that an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet, bite not.
This day’s black fate on mo days doth depend;
This but begins the woe others must end.

ROMEO.
This shall determine that.

ROMEO.
Let me stand on sudden haste, no such sight to be shown.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He made my cheek
With thy tongue as steel I needled a pitch.
Be not so long to speak. He’s too rough;
And my comfort is not up to that;
So please thou my lord.

ULIET.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

JULIET.
I doubt it not, and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.
I have faith, too, in the airy counsel of stars
That free us all to think our own futures in our hearts so.
Good night, good night. As sweet repose and rest
Come to thy heart as that within my breast.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

JULIET.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

JULIET.
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine.

ULIET.
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender
As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.

ROMEO.
I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My husband is on earth, my faith in heaven.
How shall that faith return again to earth,
Unless that husband send it me from heaven
By leaving earth? Comfort me, counsel me.
Alack, alack, that heaven should practise stratagems
Upon so soft a subject as myself.
What say’st thou? Hast thou not a word of joy?
Some comfort, Nurse.

ULIET.
Father, what news? What hast thou there?
The manner in’clining of my intercession.
How oddly thou repliest.

JULIET.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Amen.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou canst not prove it. All this proves
Myman’s love is a fiction.
I’ll believe it or not, he says in affirmation.

ULIET.
Ay me, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

JULIET.
Can heaven be so envious?

EO.
Let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

ROMEO.
Feeling so the loss, I cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

ROMEO.
I can tell you: but young Romeo will be older when you have found him
than he was when you sought him. I am the youngest of that name, for
fault of a worse.

ROMEO.
My bosom’s lord is as dear to me today
As is the heart of a rich goose.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear! Honest Nurse, farewell.

ROMEO.
Amen, amen, but come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
I have just had. More light and light we both must go.

ROMEO.
Come hither, man. I see that you have found my man.
What’s here? A lantern? What is it you ask’st me?

ULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have mangled it?
But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
And yet methinks I never doth


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

egEO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
Ay, my ladyship; the more is my unrest.

ROMEO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?

ULIET.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Amen.

JULIET.
Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in, and tell my lady I am gone,
Having displeas’d my father, to Lawrence’ cell,
To make confession and to be absolv’d.

JULIET.
Can heaven be so envious?

JULIET.
No, it is not so. Heaven is hateful,
And hell itself is hateful.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?

JULIET.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Amen.

ULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.

ULIET.
Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy!

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Is thy news good or bad? Answer to that;
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.
Let me be satisfied, is’t good or bad?

JULIET.
No, no. But all this did I know before.
What says he of our marriage? What of that?

ULIET.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine.

JULIET.
No, no. But all this did I know before.
What says he of our marriage? What of that?

ULIET.
Feeling so the loss,
I cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

ROMEO.
Is it even so? Then my heart abhors
To hear him lament the loss.

JULIET.
That ‘tis not so. It is too rash,
Too rash, too like the lightning,
To be of little help. Love, peace, be thyself.

JULIET.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news.

ROMEO.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

JULIET.
Amen.

JULIET.
Amen.

JULIET.
Amen, amen, but come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
That one short minute gives me in her sight.
Do thou but close our hands with holy words,
Then love-devouring death do what he dare,
It is enough I may but call her mine.

EO.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

ROMEO.
One, gentlewoman, that God hath made for himself to mar.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
Here’s such a coil. Come, what says Romeo?

EO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

ROMEO.
Thou know’st the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.

ULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

alkULIET.
What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death;
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

JULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
And but thou love me, let them find me here.
My life were better ended by their hate
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

JULIET.
By whose direction found’st thou out this place?

ROMEO.
By love, that first did prompt me to enquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash’d with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

EO.
What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?
Or shall we on without apology?

ROMEO.
Give me a torch, I am not for this ambling;
Being but heavy I will bear the light.

ROMEO.
Speakest thou from thy heart?

ROMEO.
Amen.

EO.
Spakest thou of Juliet? How is it with her?
Doth not she think me an old murderer,
Now I have stain’d the childhood of our joy
With blood remov’d but little from her own?
Where is she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth she? And how doth


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

adaptingULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falconer’s voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again.
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo’s name.

ROMEO.
It is my soul that calls upon my name.
How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears.

JULIET.
Romeo.

ROMEO.
Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee,
I have no joy of this contract tonight;
It is too rash, too unadvis’d, too sudden,
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say It lightens. Sweet, good night.
This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath,
May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.
Good night, good night. Although I joy in thee,
Not yet have I allure; yet am I full of joy;
Good night, good night. Yet be not so long to be merry.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

JULIET.
By and by I come—
To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief.
Tomorrow will I send.

ROMEO.
To the Friar.

JULIET.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

EO.
Then, window, let day in, and let life out.

ROMEO.
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

JULIET.
Father, I am content. But that not all this proves,
My soul’s dear love is asunder.

ROMEO.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Art thou gone so? Love, lord, ay husband, friend,
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days.
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo.

ROMEO.
Farewell.

ULIET.
Is the day so young?

ROMEO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

JULIET.
Not having that which, having, makes them short.

ROMEO.
Out.

EO.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp’d and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Ay, Nurse, if that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I’ll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite,
And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

ROMEO.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

ROMEO.
That a gentleman should wish to woo.

ROMEO.
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak
more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

JULIET.
Commend me to thy lady.

JULIET.
What villain, madam?

JULIET.
Villain and he be many miles asunder.
God pardon him. I do, with all my heart.
And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart.

EO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

EO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
A rhyme I learn’d even now
Of one I danc’d withal.


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

zeeEO.
Again in triumph, and Mercutio slain?
Away to heaven respective lenity,
And fire-ey’d fury be my conduct now!
Now, Tybalt, take the ‘villain’ back again
That late thou gav’st me, for Mercutio’s soul
Is but a little way above our heads,
Staying for thine to keep him company.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with him.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Nay, that’s not so. Let me be ta’en, let me be put to death,
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.
I’ll say yon grey is not the morning’s eye,
’Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia’s brow.
Nor that is not the lark whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads.
I have more care to stay than will to go.
Come, death, and welcome. Juliet wills it so.
How is’t, my soul? Let’s talk. It is not day.

JULIET.
It is, it is! Hie hence, be gone, away.
It is the lark that sings so out of tune,
Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.
Some say the lark makes sweet division;
This doth not so, for she divideth us.
Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyes.
O, now I would they had chang’d voices too,
Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray,
Hunting thee hence with hunt’s-up to the day.
O now be gone, more light and light it grows.

EO.
Now, Tybalt, take the ‘villain back again
That late thou gav’st me, for Mercutio’s soul
Is but a little way above our heads,
Staying for thine to keep him company.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with him.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Nay, that is not so. Let me be ta’en, let me be put to death,
I am content, so thee wilt have it so.
I have more care to stay than will to go.
Come, death, and welcome. Juliet wills it so.
How is’t, my soul? Let’s talk. It is not day.
Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyes.
O, now I would they had chang’d voices too,
Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray,
Hunting thee hence with hunt’s-up to the day.
O now be gone, more light and light it grows.

ROMEO.
Now, Tybalt, take the ‘villain back again
That late thou gav’st me, for Mercutio’s soul
Is but a little way above our heads,
Staying for thine to keep him company.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with him.

ROMEO.
Nay, that is not so. Let me be ta’en, let me be put to death,
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.

EO.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

ROMEO.
O let me stand on sudden haste, mind!
I am not well.

ROMEO.
I am content.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ROMEO.
Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ROMEO.
Meaning, to curtsy.

EO.
How now, who calls?

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

manufacturesULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.
The other did not so.

JULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.

EO.
But that a joy past joy calls out on me,
It were a grief so brief to part with thee.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day.
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierc’d the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

ROMEO.
It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

JULIET.
Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I.
It is some meteor that the sun exhales
To be to thee this night a torchbearer
And light thee on thy way to Mantua.
Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone.

ROMEO.
Have not I the lips of sweet sleep,
Both in my weal and in thee,
That by this we may say Ay, Which we must hear again in our weal or our yoke.

JULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
I must indeed. But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee,—

EO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ROMEO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve but as a note
Where I may read who pass’d that passing fair?
Farewell.

ROMEO.
By and by I come—

EO.
I warrant


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

HarbaughULIET.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

JULIET.
Well what was yours?

JULIET.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
What are they, I beseech your ladyship?

EO.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ROMEO.
I doubt it not, and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.

ROMEO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

ROMEO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

EO.
My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue’s utterance, yet I know the sound.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

ROMEO.
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.

ROMEO.
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.

ROMEO.
O, I am fortune’s fool!

ROMEO.
Ay me, what storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
O, I am fortune’s fool!

JULIET.
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a waggoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaway’s eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalk’d of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties: or, if love be blind,
It best agrees with night. Come, civil night,
Thou sober-suited matron, all in black,
And learn me how to lose a winning match,
Play’d for a pair of stainless maidenhoods.
Hood my unmann’d blood, bating in my cheeks,
With thy black mantle, till strange love, grow bold,
Think true love acted simple modesty.
Come, night, come Romeo; come, thou day in night;
For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night
Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back.
Come gentle night, come loving black-brow’d night,
Give me my Romeo, and when I shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night,
And pay no worship to the garish sun.
O, I have bought the mansion of a love,
But not possess’d it; and though I am sold,
Not yet enjoy’d. So tedious is this day
As is the night before some festival
To an impatient child that hath new robes
And may not wear them. O, here comes my Nurse,
And she brings news, and every tongue that speaks
But Romeo’s name speaks heavenly eloquence.
Now, Nurse,—O Romeo, why look’st thou sad?
Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily;
If good, thou sham’st the music of sweet news
By playing it to me with so sour a face.
But if thou meanest not good, thou sham’st the music of sweet news
By playing it to me with so sour a face.
For I am too sore enpierced with his image
To be his interpreter. O, tell me, Nurse,—Why look’st thou sad?
Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily;
If good


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

BentULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have mangled it?
But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband.
Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring,
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you mistaking offer up to joy.
My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain,
And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband.
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,
That murder’d me. I would forget it fain,
But O, it presses to my memory
Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds.
Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banished.
That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
Was woe enough, if it had ended there.
Or if sour woe delights in fellowship,
And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
Why follow’d not, when she said Tybalt’s dead,
Thy father or thy mother, nay or both,
Which modern lamentation might have mov’d?
But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
‘Romeo is banished’—to speak that word
Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
All slain, all dead. Romeo is banished,
There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
In that word’s death, no words can that woe sound.
Where is my father and my mother, Nurse?

JULIET.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent,
When theirs are dry, for Romeo’s banishment.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I; for Romeo is exil’d.
He made you for a highway to my bed,
But I, a maid, die maiden-widowed.
Come cords, come Nurse, I’ll to my wedding bed,
And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ULIET.
Ah, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy
Be heap’d like mine, and that thy skill be more
To blazon it, then sweeten with thy breath
This neighbour air, and let rich music’s tongue
Unfold the imagin’d happiness that both
Receive in either by this dear encounter.

JULIET.
Conceit more rich in matter than in words,
Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
They are but beggars that can count their worth;
But my true love is grown to such excess,
I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ijuanaEO.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I’ll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite,
And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

ROMEO.
I come, anon.— But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee,—

JULIET.
By and by I come—
To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief.
Tomorrow will I send.

ROMEO.
So thrive my soul,—

ULIET.
Art thou gone so? Love, lord, ay husband, friend,
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days.
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo.

ROMEO.
Farewell!
I will omit no opportunity
That may convey my greetings, love, to thee.

EO.
Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace,
Thou talk’st of nothing.

ROMEO.
I fear too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars,
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels; and expire the term
Of a despised life, clos’d in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
But he that hath the steerage of my course
Direct my suit. On, lusty gentlemen!

ROMEO.
What lady is that, which doth enrich the hand
Of yonder knight?

ROMEO.
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows
As yonder lady o’er her fellows shows.
The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand,
And touching hers, make blessed my rude hand.
Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!
For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.

ROMEO.
So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that.
Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I come, anon.— But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee,—

JULIET.
By and by I come—
To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief.
Tomorrow will I send.

ROMEO.
So thrive my soul,—

EO.
And we mean well in going to this mask;
But ’tis no wit to go.

ROMEO.
It is but my rough request that thou allow.

ROMEO.
And trust me, love, in my word,—

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.
The other did not so.

ROMEO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ULIET.
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a waggoner
As Phaeton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaway’s eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalk’d of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties: or, if love be blind,
It best agrees with night. Come, civil night,
Thou sober-suited matron, all in black,
With thy black mantle, and lace club,
With nimble soles, lace maids, and much more;
From off the battlements till you can no longer move,
Come gentle night, come loving black-brow’d night,
Give me my Romeo, and when I shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

eaturesEO.
O, I am fortune’s fool!

ROMEO.
Ay, If I know the letters and the language.

ROMEO.
Stay, fellow; I can read.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
The lady widow of Utruvio;
Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters;
My fair niece Rosaline and Livia;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and the lively Helena.
A fair assembly. Whither should they come?

ULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day.
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierc’d the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

ROMEO.
It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

JULIET.
Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I.
It is some meteor that the sun exhales
To be to thee this night a torchbearer
And light thee on thy way to Mantua.
Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone.

ULIET.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say Ay,
And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,
They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond;
And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond;
And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true

Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true

Than those that have more cunning to be strange.In truth, fair, I am too fond;And therefore thou mayst think my ’


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

AwareEO.
Ah, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy
Be heap’d like mine, and that thy skill be more
To blazon it, then sweeten with thy breath
This neighbour air, and let rich music’s tongue
Unfold the imagin’d happiness that both
Receive in either by this dear encounter.

JULIET.
Conceit more rich in matter than in words,
Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
They are but beggars that can count their worth;
But my true love is grown to such excess,
I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.

JULIET.
I have; and therefore come hither. Good gentle youth,
Put not another sin upon my head
By urging me to fury. O be gone.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against myself.
Stay not, be gone, live, and hereafter say,
A madman’s mercy bid thee run away.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy!

ROMEO.
Swits and spurs, swits and spurs; or I’ll cry a match.

ROMEO.
Thou wast never with me for anything, when thou wast not there for the
goose.

ULIET.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ROMEO.
I would I were thy bird.

EO.
And I’ll go along too, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of my own.

ROMEO.
Nurse.

JULIET.
O single-soled jest, solely singular for the singleness!

ROMEO.
Swits and spurs, swits and spurs; or I’ll cry a match.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy!

ULIET.
Ay me, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

JULIET.
Can heaven be so envious?

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it,
That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
What are they, I beseech your ladyship?

ULIET.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church, and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.
I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Yet be thankful I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo. I have forgot why I made thee wait.

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee; for I’ll not away.

EO.
Good father, I beseech thee, Nurse, to come to me each day
To help me with any sudden need;
Or if thou wish to go into another man’s bed,
Come Nurse, and help him come to me.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ROMEO.
What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death;
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
Then banished?


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

huULIET.
Commend me to thy lady.

ROMEO.
And bad’st me bury love.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What hast thou there?
What hast thou found?

ROMEO.
I will follow you.

ROMEO.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor.
Hold, there is forty ducats. Let me have
A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear
As will disperse itself through all the veins,
That the life-weary taker may fall dead,
And that the trunk may be discharg’d of breath
As violently as hasty powder fir’d
Doth hurry from the fatal cannon’s womb.

ROMEO.
I see thou wast not well. Poor me, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
What counterfeit did I give you?

EO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ROMEO.
Do so, and bid my sweet prepare to chide.

ROMEO.
How well my comfort is reviv’d by this.

ROMEO.
By thy help I’ll be more prosperous in this loathsome world
Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

EO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity. She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair. She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor

That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

FFFFULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help!

ROMEO.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!

ROMEO.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.
Farewell, dear father.

ULIET.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ROMEO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.

EO.
Tut! I have lost myself; I am not here.
This is not Romeo, he’s some other where.

ROMEO.
Ay, If I know the letters and the language.

ROMEO.
Stay, fellow; I can read.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
The lady widow of Utruvio;
Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters;
My fair niece Rosaline and Livia;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and the lively Helena.
A fair assembly. Whither should they come?

ULIET.
What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

ROMEO.
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine.
And so good Capulet, which gave me strength to die,
Is gone, and all this happiness comes to an end.

JULIET.
Not I, unless the breath of heartsick groans
Mist-like infold me from the search of eyes.

ROMEO.
Nurse.

EO.
The clock struck nine when I did send my Nurse,
In


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

OftenULIET.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ROMEO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

JULIET.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve but as a note
Where I may read who pass’d that passing fair?
Farewell, thou canst not teach me to forget.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou, my dear Romeo?

ULIET.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

JULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O sweet my mother, cast me not away,
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My husband is on earth, my faith in heaven.
How shall that faith return again to earth,
Unless that husband send it me from heaven
By leaving earth? Comfort me, counsel me.
Alack, alack, that heaven should practise stratagems
Upon so soft a subject as myself.
What say’st thou? Hast thou not a word of joy?
Some comfort, Nurse.

EO.
Tut! I have lost myself; I am not here.
This is not Romeo, he’s some other where.

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

ROMEO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

ROMEO.
A right good markman, and she’s fair I love.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.

EO.
The clock struck nine when I did send the Nurse,
In half an hour


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

failsEO.
I fear too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars,
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels; and expire the term
Of a despised life, clos’d in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
But he that hath the steerage of my course
Direct my suit. On, lusty gentlemen!

ROMEO.
What lady is that, which doth enrich the hand
Of yonder knight?

ROMEO.
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows
As yonder lady o’er her fellows shows.
The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand,
And touching hers, make blessed my rude hand.
Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!
For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.

ROMEO.
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

ROMEO.
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

JULIET.
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ULIET.
Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,
And fear’st to die? Famine is in thy cheeks,
Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes,
Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back.
The world is not thy friend, nor the world’s law;
The world affords no law to make thee rich;
Then be not poor, but break it and take this.

ROMEO.
I pay thy poverty, and not thy will.

ROMEO.
And pay thy poverty, too, when thou hast drunk thyself?

ROMEO.
For shame, shame is not slaughter’d; for joy is in thee,
And not death, though fairly say’d,
Lest that thy joy prove not rich in itself.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless the breath of heartsick groans
Mist-like infold me from the search of eyes.

ROMEO.
Nurse.

ULIET.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender
As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Whither to supper?

JULIET.
Whose house?

ROMEO.
Indeed I should have ask’d you that before.

JULIET.
When the devout religion of mine eye
Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fire;
And these who, often drown’d, could never die,
Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars.
One fairer than my love? The all-seeing sun
Ne’er saw her match since first the world begun.

ULIET.
Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops,—

JULIET.
With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these tops till I was old,
And in like manner had my youth plucked
From the brink of death.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless the breath of heartsick groans
Mist-like infold me from the search of eyes.

JULIET.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender
As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.

ULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.
What shall I swear by?

ULIET.
Is the day so young?

ROMEO.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

ROMEO.
Not having that which, having, makes them short.

EO.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris?

ROMEO.
Of what use, that name, if it


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

HundredsEO.
Nay, good goose, bite not.

ROMEO.
And is it not then well served in to a sweet goose?

ROMEO.
I stretch it out for that word broad, which added to the goose, proves
thee far and wide a broad goose.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.
Out.

ROMEO.
Here’s goodly gear!
A sail, a sail!

ROMEO.

Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
The lady widow of Utruvio;
Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters;
My fair niece Rosaline and Livia;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and the lively Helena.
A fair assembly. Whither should they come?

ULIET.
What man art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

JULIET.
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.

JULIET.
I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?

JULIET.
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.
Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest.
‘Your love says, like an honest gentleman,
‘Where is your mother?’

JULIET.
Here’s such a coil. Come, what says Romeo?

ULIET.
That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO.
What must be shall be.

EO.
Out.

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love.

ROMEO.
Alas that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!
Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.

EO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

ROMEO.
A right good markman, and she’s fair I love.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ROMEO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve but as a note
Where I may read who pass’d that passing fair?
Farewell, thou canst not teach me to forget.

EO.
Now, good sweet Nurse,—O Lord, why look’st thou sad?
Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily;
If good, thou sham’st the music of sweet news
By playing it to me with so sour a face.

JULIET.
I


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

unscULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
And but thou love me, let them find me here.
My life were better ended by their hate
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

JULIET.
By whose direction found’st thou out this place?

ROMEO.
By love, that first did prompt me to enquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash’d with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

JULIET.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say Ay,
And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,
They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.

ULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
And but thou love me, let them find me here.
My life were better ended by their hate’s than by theirs;
For behold, my life were better ended by their hate’s;

JULIET.
By whose direction found’st thou out this place?

ROMEO.
By love, that first did prompt me to enquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash’d with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

JULIET.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.
But if thou doubt’st, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.

JULIET.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
And but thou love me, let them find me here.
My life were better ended by their hate’s than by theirs;
For behold, my life were better ended by their hate’s;

JULIET.
By love, that first did prompt me to enquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash’d with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

JULIET.
By love, that first did prompt me to enquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash’d with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

ULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ROMEO.
Is my father well? Go to; I say you shall.

ULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ROMEO.
Is my father well? Go to; I say you shall.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

acutelyULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

JULIET.
Well what was yours?

JULIET.
Poison, I am poison’d.

JULIET.
Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

ROMEO.
Not mad, but bound more than a madman is:
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp’d and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

JULIET.
Ay, mine own fortune in my misery.

ROMEO.
Ay, If I know the letters and the language.

ROMEO.
Stay, fellow; I can read.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
The lady widow of Utruvio;
Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters;
My fair niece Rosaline and Livia;
Signior Valentio and the lively Helena.
A fair assembly. Whither should they come?

EO.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

ROMEO.
Out.

ROMEO.
Hie to high fortune! Honest Nurse,—

ULIET.
O let me stand here till thou remember it.

ROMEO.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

JULIET.
Art thou gone so? Love, lord, ay husband, friend,
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days.
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo.

ROMEO.
Farewell.

JULIET.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ROMEO.
I doubt it not, and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.

JULIET.
O God! I have an ill-divining soul!
Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low,
As one dead in the bottom of a tomb.
Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale.

ULIET.
My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue’s utterance, yet I know the sound.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

ROMEO.
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.

JULIET.
What villain, madam?

EO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

ROMEO.
She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty starv’d with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise; wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair.
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

ULIET.
Art thou gone so? Love, lord, ay husband, friend,
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days.
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo.

ROMEO.
Farewell!

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! All men call thee fickle,
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him
That is renown’d for faith? Be fickle, Fortune;
For then, I hope thou wilt not keep him long
But send him back.

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! All


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

deckULIET.
O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO.
What shall I swear by?

JULIET.
Do not swear at all.
Or if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self,
Which is the god of my idolatry,
And I’ll believe thee.

ROMEO.
If my heart’s dear love,—

JULIET.
Well, in that hit you miss: I’ll believe thee.
But else, not for the world.
The world is not my friend, nor the world’s law.
Are you at leisure, holy father, now,
Or shall I come to you at evening mass?

ROMEO.
O let me stand here till thou remember it.

JULIET.
Let me stand here till thou remember it.

ROMEO.
O let me stand here till thou remember it.

EO.
That’s not so, sir, since he had better stay behind the abbey wall.

ROMEO.
Not having that which, having, makes them short.

ROMEO.
Out.

ROMEO.
Out of her favour where I am in love.

ROMEO.
Alas that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!
Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.
Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:
Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O anything, of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
Dost thou not laugh?

ROMEO.
Good heart, at what?

ROMEO.
Why such is love’s transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate to have it prest
With more of thine. This love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

ROMEO.
Tut! I have lost myself; I am not here.
This is not Romeo, he’s some other where.

ROMEO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

ROMEO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

ROMEO.
A right good markman, and she’s fair I love.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms
Nor bide th’encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O she’s rich in beauty, only poor
That when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

EO.
What, shall I groan and tell thee?

ROMEO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will,
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

ROMEO.
A right good markman, and she’s fair I love.
ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow, she hath Dian’s wit;
And in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharm’d.She will not stay the siege of


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ArabsULIET.
I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO.
I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
And but thou love me, let them find me here.
My life were better ended by their hate
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

JULIET.
By whose direction found’st thou out this place?

ROMEO.
By love, that first did prompt me to enquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash’d with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

JULIET.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say Ay,
And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,
They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond;
And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
I should have been more strange, I must confess,
But that thou overheard’st, ere I was ’ware,
My true-love passion; therefore pardon me,
And not impute this yielding to light love,
Which the dark night hath so discovered.

JULIET.
Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops,—

EO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

ROMEO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
And bad’st me bury love.

ROMEO.
I pray thee chide me not, her I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow.
The other did not so.

ULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls,
For stony limits cannot hold love out,
And what love can do, that dares love attempt:
Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.

JULIET.
Yet were they not blind, they might have seen thee here.

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

JULIET.
Well what was yours?

ROMEO.
I can tell you: but young Romeo will be older when you have found him
than he was when you sought him. I am the youngest of that name, for
fault of a worse.

ULIET.
Romeo.

ROMEO.
My nyas?

JULIET.
Then I defy you, stars! Love, grant me love,
Thy purpose marriage; let me henceforth be married.

ROMEO.
Let me be ta’en, let me be put to death,
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.

JULIET.
I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?

JULIET.
Where is my mother? Why, she is within.
Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest.


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ProviderULIET.
What’s he that follows here, that would not dance?

ROMEO.
Go ask his name. If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

JULIET.
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

ROMEO.
A rhyme I learn’d even now
Of one I danc’d withal.

ROMEO.
Can I go forward when my heart is here?
Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out.

ROMEO.
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!
Arise fair sun and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou her maid art far more fair than she.
Be not her maid since she is envious;
Her vestal livery is but sick and green,
And none but fools do wear it; cast it off.
It is my lady, O it is my love!
O, that she knew she were!

EO.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

ROMEO.
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ULIET.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
She speaks.
O speak again bright angel, for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o’er my head,
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him
When he bestrides the lazy-puffing clouds
And sails upon the bosom of the air.

JULIET.
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name.
Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O be some other name.
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

ROMEO.
I take thee at thy word.
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptis’d;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

ULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ULIET.
Ay me.

ROMEO.
Is the day so young?

JULIET.
Ay me, sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

ROMEO.
Not having that which, having, makes them short.

ULIET.
Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy!
I beseech thee, ladyship, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I’ll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite,
And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

ROMEO.
I come, anon.— But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee,—

ULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
The clock struck nine when I did send the Nurse,
In half an hour she promised to return.
Perchance she cannot


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

shutULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What hideous face hid the sweetest night
Of yonder bargain in Juliet’s breast?
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What hideous face hid the sweetest night
Of yonder bargain in Juliet’s breast?
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What hideous face hid the sweetest night
Of yonder bargain in Juliet’s breast?
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What hideous face hid the sweetest night
Of yonder bargain in Juliet’s breast?
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
What hideous face hid the sweetest night
Of yonder bargain in Juliet’s breast?
Delay this marriage for a month, a week,
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

ULIET.
Now, good sweet Nurse,—O Lord, why look’st thou sad?
Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily;
If good, thou sham’st the music of sweet news
By playing it to me with so sour a face.

JULIET.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news:
Nay come, I pray thee speak; good, good Nurse, speak.

JULIET.
Good even to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
As much to him, else is his thanks too much.

ULIET.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

ULIET.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

JULIET.
I’ll look to like, if looking liking move:
But no more deep will I endart mine eye
Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.

ROMEO.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender
As dearly as mine own.

JULIET.
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment.
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say Ay,
And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,
They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond;
And therefore thou mayst think my ’haviour light:
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.

EO.
Do so, and bid my sweet prepare to chide.

ROMEO.
What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death;
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself.
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Then banished
Is death misterm’d.


===== CHECKPOINT 052 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

“+EO.
Not I, believe me, you have dancing shoes,
With nimble soles, I have a soul of lead
So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

ROMEO.
Feeling so the loss,
I cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

JULIET.
That is no slander, sir, which is a truth,
And what I spake, I spake it to my face.

ROMEO.
You are too fair, I am too fair;
And therefore I warrant you my man’s as true as steel.

JULIET.
Not I, believe me, you have dancing shoes,
With nimble soles, I have a soul of lead
So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

ROMEO.
Feeling so the loss, I cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

JULIET.
That is no slander, sir, which is a truth,
And what I spake, I spake it to my face.

ROMEO.
You are too fair, I am too fair;
And therefore I warrant you my man’s as true as steel.

EO.
Not I, believe me, you have dancing shoes,
With nimble soles, I have a soul of lead
So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

ROMEO.
Feeling so the loss, I cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

JULIET.
Not I, believe me, you have dancing shoes,
With nimble soles, I have a soul of lead
So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

ROMEO.
Feeling so the loss, I cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

EO.
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

ROMEO.
I do protest I never injur’d thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise
Till thou shalt know the reason of my love.
And so good Capulet, which name I tender
As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage,
Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath
Forbid this bandying in Verona streets.
Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!

ROMEO.
Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.

ROMEO.
I thought all for the best.

ROMEO.
Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed;
For I’ll still stay the siege,
Still commission thee with great severity,
And with some sweet Nurse’s help, I’ll wreak my revenge tonight.

ULIET.
Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee,
I have no joy of this contract tonight;
It is too rash, too unadvis’d, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say It lightens. Sweet, good night.
This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath,
May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.
Good night, good night. As sweet repose and rest
Come to thy heart as that within my breast.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

EO.
How now, who calls?

ROMEO.
Madam, I am here. What is your will?

JULIET.
And stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse, say I.

ROMEO.
Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ULIET.
Art thou gone so? Love, lord, ay husband, friend,
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days.
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo.

ROMEO.
Farewell!
I will omit no opportunity
That may convey my greetings, love, to thee.

JULIET.
O thinkest thou we shall ever meet again?

ULIET.
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my


===== CHECKPOINT 052 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

cloakULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

JULIET.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
And bad’st me bury love.

EO.
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

ROMEO.
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ROMEO.
O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do:
They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

ROMEO.
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake.

ULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

JULIET.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.

EO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

ROMEO.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
And bad’st me bury love.

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ROMEO.
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ROMEO.
O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do:
They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

ROMEO.
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake.

ULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
And all combin’d, save what thou must combine
By holy marriage. When, and where, and how
We met, we woo’d, and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,
That thou consent to marry us today.

JULIET.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

ROMEO.
Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more.
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows,
Being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.

EO.
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

ROMEO.
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.

ROMEO.
If either thee dislike,
go with him.

ROMEO.
No, no. But all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in their native time.

ULIET.
Nay, that’s not so.

ROMEO.
And is it not then well served in to a muffled sigh?

ULIET.
Sweet, so would I:


===== CHECKPOINT 052 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

optimalULIET.
It is an honour that I dream not of.

ROMEO.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou?

ULIET.
Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in, and tell my lady I am gone,
Having displeas’d my father, to Lawrence’ cell,
To make confession and to be absolv’d.

JULIET.
Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!
Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn,
Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue
Which she hath prais’d him with above compare
So many thousand times? Go, counsellor.
Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy.
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

EO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ROMEO.
Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ROMEO.
Meaning, to curtsy.

ROMEO.
A most courteous exposition.

EO.
If I know the letters and the language,
I may bound them.

ROMEO.
Stay, fellow; I can read.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters;
My fair niece Rosaline and Livia;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and the lively Helena.
A fair assembly. Whither should they come?

ULIET.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church, and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.
I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What say’st thou, my lord and father?

ULIET.
Ay me, what news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?

JULIET.
Can heaven be so envious?

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.

EO.
How now, who calls?

ROMEO.
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

EO.
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

ROMEO.
Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace,
Thou talk’st of nothing.

ROMEO.
I fear too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars,
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels; and expire the term
Of a despised life, clos’d in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
But he that hath the steerage of my course
Direct my suit. On, lusty gentlemen!

ROMEO.
Go, lusty gentlemen; I beseech thee, pilot!
Towards nine o’clock in the morning
A light upon my counsel, and I’ll quit thy pains;
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by


===== CHECKPOINT 052 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

recruitsEO.
O, that thou wilt speak again of banishment.

ROMEO.
Yet banished? Hang up philosophy.
Unless philosophy can make a Juliet,
Displant a town, reverse a Prince’s doom,
It helps not, it prevails not, talk no more.

ROMEO.
Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

ROMEO.
Now by Saint Peter’s Church, and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he that should be husband comes to woo.
I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day.
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierc’d the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

ROMEO.
It was the nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

JULIET.
Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I.
It is some meteor that the sun exhales
To be to thee this night a torchbearer
And light thee on thy way to Mantua.
Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone.

EO.
Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

ROMEO.
Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great, and in such a case as
mine a man may strain courtesy.

ROMEO.
Meaning, to curtsy.

ROMEO.
A most courteous exposition.

ROMEO.
Pink for flower.

ROMEO.
Why, then is my pump well flowered.

ROMEO.
O single-soled jest, solely singular for the singleness!

ROMEO.
Swits and spurs, swits and spurs; or I’ll cry a match.

ULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What say’st thou? Hast thou not a word of joy?

ULIET.
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have.
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate that is meant love.

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

JULIET.
What say’st thou? Hast thou not a word of joy?

JULIET.
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

EO.
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’ souls,
Doing more murder in this loathsome world
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
I sell thee poison, thou hast sold me none.

ROMEO.
Ay, If I know the letters and the language.

ROMEO.
Stay, fellow; I can read.
Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
County Anselmo and his beauteous sisters;
The lady widow of Utruvio;
Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces;
Mercutio and his brother Valentine;
Mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters;
My fair niece Rosaline and Livia;
Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt;
Lucio and the lively Helena.
A fair assembly. Whither should they come?

ULIET.
What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom?

JULIET.
Ha, b