Full Log #4

Complete training session logs dump.

Taken with Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V from Notepad.

Ok, I know … Must confest. Training this under Windows … Guilty as charged!

Training from scratch with gpt2
checkpoint_steps: 100
Train inputs found: 140
Train 2 inputs found: 0


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boots to put on, or to bring up, and what not. Then you’re stuck in the woods. You’re out for five hours, and if you don’t get up and walk up to a bunch of tree-ringer guys, then they can take your bike or any other weapon and take you out.

“It’s not easy,” says a soldier on the ground, who goes by the title of “Sgt. G. “

“It’s not easy. It is like, ‘Oh, I will never have to do that,’ ” he adds, as the man pulls up behind him. “That’s what I am. I’m an American. I’m a sergeant. I know who I am.”

The soldier is in his fifth year in the Army and has never heard of Sgt. G. “G” McAllister. He says he was with the Marine Corps in Vietnam and said he got his first assignment in the mid-1960s while his family lived with his father and grandfather in North Carolina.

He says the next day, when he returned to the Marine Corps he found that the Marine Corps had given him no training, and that he hadn’t completed his unit training. After three years of fighting and being told he couldn’t do anything, the Army gave him a promotion to sergeant in 1967.

“I was really relieved. I was relieved,” he says.

His new promotion finally came in the summer of 1966. He had been assigned to the 11th Armored Brigade Combat Team. At night he could see a group of soldiers firing on each other. The Marines fired again, firing again. When he was up he got out of the car.

“The sergeant asked me, ‘How’s it going to feel?’ ” he recalls, pointing out a line of dead soldiers. “I said, ‘I didn’t know, I was lucky enough to have a platoon to do the job. I was just on the front line when I was shot.’ And then the sergeant said, ‘Oh my God, you were lucky. You were lucky.'”

He couldn’t get the job, so he kept his foot in the door. The soldiers let him in and took him to the barracks.

At night he would lay down with the dead soldiers at the end of the line. One of the soldiers, a sergeant who had been shot down in action, would run to the door, pull him back and put him down. The other soldier would grab the fallen soldier’s head, and let it fall out, and drop the body on the ground.

He and his fellow soldiers made their way to the nearest barracks. They were all uniformed Marines.

The sergeant said he saw them all fall from their positions, and they would drop their heads on the ground and hold them there. They would then be shot down and be carried to the front lines where the next group of Marines would arrive.

It is now reported that the Sergeant was wounded in one of the dead soldiers’ bullets, and his father said he was sorry to hear the news.

When the soldiers finished their mission the next day, they were moved to the barracks for the next day. The rest of the infantry, including the Marine division’s 7th Infantry Division, were all in the area.

“The Marines took out a few of the other soldiers, and then we started to bring them back,” says Capt. Robert Czajal, the platoon’s 7th and 10th Infantry Divisions general officer in charge of the area.

The Marines are still at the barracks, with the 1st Marines and 1st Airborne Division still under assault.

The 1st Division was part of the 6th Armored Brigade Combat Team, which received the 4th Marines and 5th Airborne Division. The 1st and 2nd Division are the 1st and 2nd Cavalry Divisions.

It is unclear how many other divisions were in the field.

The Marines’ 10th, 11th and 12th Divisions, which included the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, were still under heavy artillery fire.

The battalion was the 8th Armored Brigade Combat Team, which received the 10th Infantry Division and the 11th Infantry Division.

“The 4th and 10th Divisions were in the same situation,” says Capt. David Zaretsky, the 2nd Division’s 7th Armored Division general officer. “That was a little bit unusual for them.”

He says a lot of the troops were wounded, but they were taking care of each other. The 5th Army division had been moving troops from the 5th Armored Brigade Combat Team to the 3rd Infantry Division on a mission to capture the village of Waco.

The 1st Armored Division’s 5th Marine Division and 1st Marine Division were at the rear of the front line and were still under the control of the 1st Armored Division.


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docs: https://www.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/7k5j7y/what_was_your_favorite_bitcoin_wallet_list_to_get_into_2016/

The Bitcoin Price

https://www.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/7k5j7y/what_was_your_favorite_bitcoin_wallet_list_to_get_into_2016/

Bitcoin Exchange Rate Chart

http://bitrate.com/bitcoin-exchange-rate-chart

Bitcoin exchange rates are based on the Bitcoin Price, which is also known as the Bitcoupon (or “BOM”). The bitcoin exchange rate is also called the Bitcoin price.

Bitcoin is not a currency nor is it a company. It is an asset backed by a digital coin (e.g., bitcoin) which is used to purchase goods or services. It is used by individuals in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, paying in bitcoins, exchanging money, purchasing products and services, and trading currency.

Bitcoin is not a single currency or company, and will not be traded or exchanged. All Bitcoin is a distributed and untraceable ledger (a “chain”) that acts as a central and trusted cryptographic repository. Any changes to or additions to the Bitcoin chain are not created or maintained on an individual basis but by consensus on the network and distributed consensus.

Cryptocurrencies

Bitcoin is a decentralized, peer-to-peer digital currency, a decentralized and trusted digital money.

Bitcoin is currently considered a “decentralized” or “decentralized” currency, but in reality it is not a money system at all. Unlike many other digital currencies, Bitcoin is not exchangeable through the Internet, as it cannot be tracked, exchanged or otherwise made available on the Internet (though many people still use it).

As a currency, Bitcoin is based on a set of cryptographic principles:

An anonymous “mining pool” of cryptographic nodes is the only source of information to the user. (These are called “mining pools”).

A proof-of-work system (an algorithm) is a mathematical proof of the existence of a specific physical or digital asset that is physically used by the user in order to validate a given value, and then to distribute that asset as described in the next section.

A block of proof-of-work is a list of cryptographic blocks that have been produced with the block time specified in the first block, and that have been confirmed by the hash algorithm for each block.

A block of proof-of-work is a list of digital assets that are being used in an effort to provide a proof of work (as opposed to simply an initial list of all of the digital assets in the block or block chain).

Block chain technologies, such as Bitcoin Core, are not necessarily based on the “block chain” technology that enables or incentivizes the production of Bitcoin. However, Block chain technology has been in the works for many years, and in the past it has been used to create “chains” that are not only safe, secure and decentralized, but also are “proof of stake” (the ability to hold on to physical assets and create “chains”).

There are many cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin, Litecoin, Monero and other cryptocurrencies) that use an existing peer-to-peer network and the “network” as their currency to provide a “proof of stake” in their “proof of existence”. These cryptocurrencies are “cryptocurrencies” rather than “litecoins” or other cryptocurrencies.

For more information on the Bitcoin Blockchain, please refer to: http://bitchain.info/

Cryptocurrencies and their “Proof of Work”

Cryptocurrencies are not a single currency or company, and will not be traded or exchanged. All Bitcoin is a decentralized and trusted digital money.

Bitcoin is not a single currency or company, and will not be traded or exchanged. All Bitcoin is a distributed and untraceable ledger (a “chain”) that acts as a central and trusted cryptographic repository. Any changes to or additions to the Bitcoin chain are not created or maintained on an individual basis but by consensus on the network and distributed consensus.

Cryptocurrencies are not a single currency or company, and will not be traded or exchanged. All Bitcoin is a distributed and untraceable ledger (a “chain”) that acts as a central and trusted cryptographic repository. Any changes to or additions to the Bitcoin chain are not created or maintained on an individual basis but by consensus on the network and distributed consensus.

Cryptocurrencies are not a single currency or company, and will not be traded or exchanged. All Bitcoin is a distributed and untraceable ledger (a “chain”) that acts as a central and trusted cryptographic repository. Any changes to or additions to the Bitcoin chain are not created or maintained on an


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artificed by him, and made with him, and made him into the Lord. It is, therefore, so manifest. What does the Lord say about him? “I, his sons, who are in bondage in Egypt, and in his kingdom, will not suffer him to be sent, but will take my law as their own,” says he, “to make the law of God, and to do all things according to the law of God. But let no man believe in his laws, or in his ordinances, but in the love of God, which is my righteousness.” So then, if a man will be sent, he will be in the state of a stranger to a stranger, and will not be sent to teach men in what is good, as it were, in the good things, or in what is bad, according to the truth which is the word of God. And as for the Gentiles, and to be in prison for the remission of sins, they must be sent not to go to a stranger, but only to the Lord, so we should be taught in the righteousness which is in God and in the Law of God. “My children, I will be with you and go with you to preach righteousness to you,” he says; “not to bring me to you, but to show you, that I am the one who is not sent.” Then, says the Lord, “if I shall not go, shall you send me to me, or shall I send you away to go with you to Egypt and take your law which you have prepared for you, and to make your law according to the law of God? Then I am your judge, who hath spoken the law according to the law of God.”

8.

Now, according to the Book of Leviticus, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord, and the King of Israel are sent out of Egypt, and have put in their place the King of Babylon, the Pharaoh of Babylon, and the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, and the God of Israel. Therefore they have made themselves to be sent to be in bondage in Egypt, because the Lord Jesus Christ the Lord, and Jesus Christ, and the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord Jesus Christ, the


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swearing as she was about to deliver the keynote speech, when a group of young white males approached her. They took her into the bushes and grabbed her from behind. They took her to the back of the building and told her she wasn’t welcome. The police officer who approached her asked her whether she had any questions. She said yes. The officers then told her to shut her mouth and continue to interrogate her. After about a half hour, the group told her she was being harassed.

When she finally gave up, her white male friend called her racist. He told her that the police were in his office and told her she had to get back to the building to find him. He threatened to kill her.

After the attack, the group of young white males said they would never let her walk again. They left a message on a nearby Facebook page for someone who was not there:

I’m black and I can’t believe this. It feels like a slap on the face. I’m scared. I don’t want to go home. This is not acceptable.

The group called me a “Nazi,” and also called my name racist. That’s when my friend told me she had a boyfriend. They told me I needed to have a boyfriend for them to use. I just walked in.

When I saw a group of young white males, my first thought was how disgusting it was. They started kicking my ass.

When I finally did get home and looked up to see if the group was still around, I thought I saw a group of kids attacking me. A couple boys. One got angry and attacked me. Then, one of the boys started punching me in the face, my head, and the other got into a headlock. He didn’t leave my hand and tried to hit me with it, but I kept running away. It seemed like my head had already been struck.

As soon as I finally got out of the building, I heard gunshots. I was so angry. I went upstairs and looked up to see a white male approaching me, and I heard him ask why he attacked me. I told him I didn’t get any punches. He told me to get up, and that I had no choice but to walk away.

I didn’t want to get into a fight. I didn’t want to be in trouble. I felt I needed to talk to him. But I couldn’t. And I was scared.

The group continued the assault. A few minutes later, another white male was standing right next to me in the back of the house. They started attacking me. The group left a message on his Facebook page. He called me a “Nazi,” and also called my name racist. He said that he was going to kill me if I didn’t go home.

“I’m afraid of your boyfriend because he’s going to kill me!” one of the white males shouted.

It’s like when you run from an airplane. But when you come to the edge of the earth, it’s like you are on the ground. I don’t know how I’m supposed to protect myself if my boyfriend attacked me.

The next day I got my medical bills paid off. It’s going to take me a while to get back to the hospital.

I started getting a medical waiver. But I had to go back to the hospital. That’s when I found out that my boyfriend was the only one that got away with this. He didn’t get away with it. I thought he was doing his job.

At the time, this was the most terrifying thing I’ve ever experienced. I was on my back in a house that was completely full of armed white males. I’m scared that I’ll be out for a long time. But I know that he will. I know that my boyfriend is going to kill me.

The attack on me was so horrific that I never went to the hospital. I didn’t even think about my boyfriend’s life. I didn’t even care that he was so scared of me. I just wanted to get back home.

The next day, I went to work.

In that evening, the man standing next to me yelled something at me. He said “he’ll shoot you in the head” or something like that. I was confused. I remember thinking that I’m an idiot.

Then I heard him say something about a white guy calling me a racist. I remember thinking, “what is this supposed to look like?”

The next morning, I went to work.

I was shocked. I was really shocked that someone would do this to me. But I didn’t think much. I thought I had been scared for a long time. I really didn’t think much about it. I knew it was going to happen to someone, and I wanted to keep it from happening to anyone. I thought maybe it was the worst thing in the


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Nin.com (http://www.nj.com/news/local/crime/2010/09/09-dawn-thursday-at-sarasota-s-police-officer-sentenced-to-life.html)

http://www.northamerica.com/articles/2010/08/27/dawn-thursday-thursday-at-sarasota-police-officer-sentenced-to-life.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2010/08/17/dawn-thursday-at-sarasota-police-officer-sentenced-to-life.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/14/business/arctic/15124937.html?_r=0

http://www.livescience.com/20150421/the-two-facts-that-you-can-see-from-a-dawn-thursday-at-an-army-stand-alone-hospital-in-the-southeast/

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/jul/28/sarasota-s-police-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.newscientist.com/articles/2009/08/17/arctic-officer-sentenced-to-life

http://www.jpost.com/the-fix/blogs/2009/08/15/arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-jalopnik/081326-arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car-story

http://www.newamericanthinker.com/2010/07/01/police-in-san-diego-dawn-thursday-at-aracana-juan-martinez-prison

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/may/29/dawn-thursday-at-sarasota-police-officer-sentenced-to-life

http://www.guardian.com/world/2003/jul/29/sarasota-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2003/jul/28/sarasota-police-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car

http://www.politico.com/2013/07/dawn-thursday-at-sarasota-police-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2009/08/18/arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/20/world/us/11342038.html?_r=0

http://www.newsmax.org/article/arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car-story

http://www.independent.co.uk/article/2009/02/05/arctic-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/world/article/arctic_police_officer_sentenced-to-life

http://www.newage.com/2010/07/24/arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.newspapers.com/2010/07/24/police-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car-story.html

http://www.newyorker.com/story/2010/07/24/arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2009/08/17/arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/article-240928/Arctic-police-officer-sentenced-to-life-in-new-city-car-story.html

http://www.newsoasays.com/article/news-world/arctic-police-offic


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Pluto.

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To be more specific, in the past week scientists have reported finding evidence of the solar system’s ability to pick up new planets around our sun and bring back new habitable worlds, possibly as early as 1.8 billion years from now. But that’s all we know.

What’s less certain, though, is whether planets from our solar system will be able to be formed. In some ways, it’s as if we haven’t found one that hasn’t already been found.

A little while back, we discovered evidence for a planet known as Kepler, an asteroid-planet system off the coast of Earth in the southern hemisphere called La Silla. That system, also known as Alpha Centauri, is just over 100 million miles from the sun and has yet to be found. However, as I detailed in that same article earlier this year, there are hundreds of other planets in the Solar System that could be created by our own sun. There are even hundreds of others that could be left out of the solar system, though that could be because we’ve been too poor at observing them.

If there’s one thing that seems to show how our solar system can pick up new planets, it’s how many of them we can find. As my colleague Jonathan Haidt points out in a recent article in The Journal of the American Meteorological Society, we are still only a few years away from seeing the first evidence for these planets, even though they seem to be on the verge of being formed.

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While Kepler’s initial discovery of Kepler-10, which has a diameter of just a few billion miles, has provided us with evidence for its possibility of being formed, it’s the next step toward getting to see more. It’s the first step toward being able to take the telescope further in order to actually photograph stars beyond Neptune. (This is, by far, the best hope we have of finding planets with star formation on their surface.)

And while Kepler-10 doesn’t yet have all the data we need to be sure it won’t be a one-shot project for the first time, it’s looking very promising right now. In this article I’ll focus on Kepler-10 and explain why that’s a good start.

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We already know there are about 15 planets left to discover, with roughly 1 percent of those candidates still unknown. We are already seeing more and more discoveries from new planets in the past year and, while the numbers don’t add up—if we even count new objects that aren’t likely to be there, Kepler-10 is likely closer to them now than we think—the number of potential candidates will increase over the coming year and a half.

In the long run, though, the next step is to find one planet that hasn’t yet been discovered, not one that has been detected yet. And that’s where Kepler-10 is starting to take off.

We’ll have to wait until Kepler comes to us in December or January to find out whether Kepler’s discovery will be as good as it needs to be.

Advertisement

Read more at the Planetary Science News blog.


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frog will try to run the same thing over and over again. But when he gets out of the way, he’ll give you one final thought: “I guess they just love him more than I do,” he said.


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Boe, and Gershom Müller were at work in Berlin, while the Germans were at the same place at the same time, and had worked on the subject in their private places. The English, German, Italian, and Austrian editors at Versailles, were equally interested, and the authors and editors of the following articles, who had received their work through their embassies, were sent to Paris, New York, Vienna, Milan, and Milan. The French editors also, along with those of Versailles, were visited in Paris; on the same night, by the following editors, published the article, in which the German editor, H. B. Ehrhardt, was asked to write about the case, and to give a general description of the circumstances in which it had taken place. He wrote back, with very slight alterations and with the same general idea.

The German and German-Italian authors had been invited to Paris, on the same date; and it seemed to them that the issue in which they had come to Paris was the question of the nature of our present state of affairs. “I will give you a view of what has happened. Your article,” they replied to the editor, “is, at least, a serious attempt to make up a situation.” And, as they were now, in their own private quarters and at Versailles, there were three or four copies of their articles in them. The first was a collection of excerpts from Gershom Müller, and the second a book which was written and edited by Dr. Ehrhardt. In each, he was asked what he was going to write about the event. “It is clear,” he replied, “that the first point is very clear, that the second, the third, the fourth is very clear; and it is evident that, if we can see that, then the reason is that there is no way of saying anything in this matter except that we can get out a complete picture. For it is absolutely clear that we must make up our circumstances.” “You are right,” they replied, “we must. I feel a certain anxiety at the idea that I could not, as a matter of principle, put forward so serious a demand; but this is my duty, and I have no more power than the man in charge.”

He did not come to Versailles, but was to go to Berlin, and to write the article in French and English.

The German and German-Italian editors at Paris, who were in their private apartments, were then told to put together a report on our present situation. The report had been drawn up in the same way as that of Gershom Müller, but with a certain difference. It was written by Dr. Müller, who had written to the editor at Versailles, to express his dissatisfaction with the state of the situation. “I do not think that your remarks are particularly satisfactory,” he wrote back, “and I do not think that you are very persuasive. If I had a chance to show you this, I might write to you immediately. My dear Dr. Müller, it is not necessary to do so. I have a great deal to do; let me tell you my situation. My only hope in this matter is that you will take it to the committee at Versailles, and give it to me. For if you do not come, you will leave us to our own devices. If you do not come, you will have nothing to say; and if you do come, and I will give you a very thorough explanation of my situation, and the circumstances which led to it, I hope you will give me your instructions.” “You are right, dear Dr. Müller,” he replied, with a very serious note. “If, however, I should think of the circumstances of the situation in Paris, I should like to say that I have nothing to say to you. It is not because I have not told you all. I have merely tried to convey your feeling to the committee at Versailles. Do you understand what I am saying?” “It is not for your reason to say that you cannot say anything. I am merely saying that you must give me your instructions.” “Oh, your good man. It will be in your power. Give me your instructions, and I will do it as a means of your satisfaction. Let the committee take my opinion and explain it to you as soon as I understand what is happening.” “Your good man, if this were my first attempt at a formal report I would be content with a brief explanation of it; but there is no way that I could get this information out of me. What you say in my head must not, of course, be an idea of my mind, but of my body; and I have to see my situation.” “I am speaking only of my mind. I know nothing of the circumstances which led to this event; I think it is very difficult for me to understand what


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Motorola Ipad 11.1 in a nutshell. With the help of my iPhone, I have a fairly decent screen, an 8.5-inch IPS IPS IPS LCD, a resolution of 1280 x 720, which is a good enough 1080p, even in heavy applications, but it’s missing a little something for my liking. However, the Ipad 11.1 really stands out because it provides all that. It has all of the things you might expect, from the ability to quickly connect a phone to the internet, to the ability to work through your daily routines without being bogged down in your iPhone’s long list of apps, and it does a great job of staying in sync with your phone.

The biggest surprise for me was the camera. I had a few concerns with the camera on the iPhone 11.1. I’m not a fan of the 4K Ultra HD option, but I have never had a chance to use a 4K Ultra HD camera on my iPhone 11.1. I’ve only had one and I’m unsure if I’ll ever get one or two. Luckily, we’ll all be using the new Camera Sense in the coming days, and the most important part is that we’re getting the biggest 4K resolution iPhone ever to be made. We’ll get to it in a minute, but here’s what we can expect.

Camera Sense

What makes the Camera Sense different from the previous generation iPhone 8? For starters, it’s a better sensor on the iPhone 11.1. It’s better than the 8.5mm equivalent, though still not better than the 9.3mm equivalent. It’s a wider aperture, so it’s less likely to get too big when you’re recording, and it’s a much more compact size and shape, making it easy to carry around in your pocket. It’s still a bit smaller, but at a little less than 10 inches. It’s also slightly faster, too.

The camera sensor has four stops, each at a range of 30mm. That’s just fine for a wide angle shot, but it’s just as good for shooting high-speed video. It’s smaller and more compact than the 8.5mm equivalent, but at just a little less than 10 inches it’s still not nearly as good as the 9.3mm equivalent. And you can set it to a standard aperture of f/2.8, which is what you’ll find on the iPhone 10, as well as at the lower end of that range (2.5mm). The 16-megapixel camera has two filters, one for each of the four sensor. If you want a wider lens, and can use more expensive lenses, then you can go for a 17-megapixel sensor.

The camera sensor has two stops, each at a range of 25mm. That’s just fine for a wide angle shot, but it’s just as good for shooting high-speed video. It’s smaller and more compact than the 8.5mm equivalent, but at just a little less than 10 inches it’s still not nearly as good as the 9.3mm equivalent. And you can set it to a standard aperture of f/2.8, which is what you’ll find on the iPhone 10, as well as at the lower end of that range (2.5mm). The 16-megapixel camera has two filters, one for each of the four sensor. If you want a wider lens, and can use more expensive lenses, then you can go for a 17-megapixel sensor. The camera has an LED flash, which takes about 30 seconds to set up, and it’s set to a standard aperture of f/3.8. You don’t need the fast shutter speed, just like in other cameras, but you might want to take a couple of seconds and get more out of it.

The camera has an LED flash, which takes about 30 seconds to set up, and it’s set to a standard aperture of f/3.8. You don’t need the fast shutter speed, just like in other cameras, but you might want to take a couple of seconds and get more out of it. The camera is fully autofocusable. This is a very new feature, and while it’s probably cool to have it, the lens on the iPhone is just so tiny that autofocus can really be a nuisance. On my iPhone, I took only 2.5 secs on my autofocus-enabled test, which was a lot.

This is a very new feature, and while it’s probably cool to have it, the lens on the iPhone is just so tiny that autofocus can really be a nuisance. On my iPhone, I took only 2.5 secs on my autofocus-enabled test, which was a lot. With the iPhone, it can be very useful for video conferencing, and for shooting videos in a wide variety of areas. There is no wireless connection, and I


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dred to make his point.

The video went viral before it was posted, but is now viewed more than 1 million times. (J.D. Garrison / Chicago Tribune)

But one of the most well-known incidents was made possible by a local woman, with whom Garrison has a similar relationship, who spoke through a lawyer who also had a similar relationship.

In the video, a man can be seen trying to climb a wall at a house by the house of a black man. Then he is seen taking out a knife and then dropping a glass onto a white person’s chest as they walk away from the house. The video goes viral and now goes on to sell more than 10,000 copies a day.

Garner has said the video, which was shot in the late 1970s and 1980s, was a joke.

In a statement, the city of Chicago’s police commissioner, James O’Neill, called the video an “act of pride,” adding that “we want all citizens to feel safe in their own homes and streets.”

[Chicago police respond to shootings of black men.]

Chicago police officials have previously said that they have not received complaints about the video or its content, but have said they have received several calls and letters asking them to act quickly on their own, and that they plan to respond to any reports about it.

The man in the video, who has not been named for legal reasons, has not been charged with any crime.

In an email to reporters, his attorney, Jason O’Malley, said he did not see the video as being a joke.

“There was a good argument to make, but you don’t say that to an African-American,” he said, adding that “we’re not trying to get attention.”

In a statement to The Post, O’Malley said, “This is a joke, and we’re sorry for any offence caused.”

At a news conference in Washington, D.C., on Friday afternoon, Clinton, a former U.S. secretary of state, apologized to the city’s African-American community for the video. She said it’s not part of her long-term goal to fix “the problem of crime,” but would keep an eye on other cities, including her own.

“It’s a tragedy that this happened in this day and age,” Clinton said. “We should all be proud that our police department is a proud city. But we’re also all proud to be part of a thriving African-American community that deserves to grow.”

[How Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Mayor Francis Slay are in a state of flux on racial issues.]

The man in the video, who was not named for legal reasons, was released from police custody on a $5,000 bond.

He will appear in court Feb. 5.

A criminal investigation into the video is ongoing, according to U.S. District Court Judge W. Douglas M. J. Lee.

The case was first reported by the AP.


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mystery: the best way to understand a particular situation is to look at the whole picture, and to draw up a chart.

So, how do we explain it? Let’s look at an example. In order to determine if something is an “adventure,” we must first check for the existence of a certain type of device in the world that allows us to see its true nature and true value. We have two possibilities: (1) We can detect a device in this world which is connected with a certain number of different objects; (2) We can tell whether the device is capable of being connected to other things. In this case, we must first look at one of the many features on the screen or in the game’s dialogue system: what type of device it is connected to. In the case of a game, we have a list of devices that the player can play with in order to get a certain level of experience. So, in this situation, we are looking for a device that allows the player to discover things, rather than to try and discover everything.

We can also use our knowledge of the game world to get a sense of how the world works. There are several different ways to get a sense of where an individual has traveled and what they have done. These may be different devices or people. In some cases, the player may have been able to see things without actually being able to know them, or they may have been able to see things in a way that was impossible to see. But sometimes they may have been able to see things so clearly that we have no idea what they were trying to say.

The last option is to look at the world itself. In the case of a game, we have the following devices: (1) the player’s phone, (2) a computer, (3) a telescope, (4) an instrument, (5) a lamp, (6) and a sound generator. And these devices are used to track things or to find out what they mean to us.

The first device is the sound generator. It is an instrument that we can use to locate the world in a certain way. It can also send signals back to the player. For example, it can send a signal to a player at any location. It can even send a signal to a certain player for use as a way to obtain information from the world.

The second device is the game server. It is a network which connects all the devices in the game world to each other, providing a secure connection between them. It is not quite a game server, because it only connects to game servers that have been connected to the game since the start of the game and so that the game players have access to the game world.

In the case of a game, it is very easy to imagine that all the devices connected to this world are connected. All of them are connected to each other. The game players will be able to use these devices to explore their surroundings, to do things in different ways. The more devices are connected, the more the world is possible to explore.

We can then compare these devices with the world we know to be a real world. In our previous game, we had been able to determine which device that was connected to which player. But we now have to think of these devices as a game, and as a “real world,” rather than a computer, to understand their physical world.

The next step is to look at what is actually going on within the world. It is very difficult to draw up a chart, because everything in the world is connected to what is going on in the world. So, we should have looked at all the device names within the game world in order to get a sense of what is actually happening. But we need to get rid of all the names that were connected to the player or connected to the world. It’s not possible to do that.

To get rid of this problem, we have to think about our system of relations, which are a set of rules that govern the actions of all of us in the game world. These rules can be called:

1) the “play” rules.

2) the “game” rules.

3) the “world” rules.

The first rule of the system has two parts: (1) a “play” game rules that allow the player to play a certain game with some of the other devices connected to the game world, and (2) a “world” game rules that allow the player to go into that world and see what the world is like.

Now, we have the following two things in mind:

First, we have to make sure that we can compare what is happening to what is actually going on in the game world, and (2) that we can use these rules to determine the relative value of a particular device in the world.

We have to be careful to make sure


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modifications of the provisions of the Constitution to make all things as they are fit, and not as they should be.

The people of New Zealand were then taken to task for their actions. This was a charge against the sovereign power of England. That there was no power in the Senate to declare an election for its officers. For this reason I have here, on a point of view which I have in mind, a special occasion; but I cannot make the same claim for the Senate from a senator, who cannot be elected in a constitutional election. Nor can I make the same claim for the Senate from another, who may have an office, a free and free Parliament, but cannot take part in it without becoming a member.

Now that the Government have taken a seat, I am afraid I should not be so proud as to say, “But what, then, are they to do with all the candidates?” And I mean that they are to be nominated, or by them, or by an agent from them, or by another. For this reason, and I know that all the candidates are candidates for the Senate, the delegates are candidates for the legislature, and that they must be chosen by the people; and I do not care to say whether they are candidates for parliament, or of any other parliament, but of one of the representatives of the people. What, then, are they to do with all the candidates?

I am not sure I must say what their right to do with their own bodies and their own representatives, if they were to elect representatives of the people in the legislature, would be; but I can say that they must elect from amongst themselves members of parliament, or of any body; but only as members.

And I say this because I will not say which of these parties is the greatest, and which is the least; for a majority will not suffice to make an election. And the first and the most frequent proposition which will be proposed to all persons is to bring the representation of the people into the House of Representatives, by means of the Constitution. That is, to appoint the representatives of the people. That is, I believe it to be true that the representatives should be in Parliament; and I will give you occasion to make a very great motion, if you may, to bring them into Parliament in order to bring the representation of the people into the House of Representatives. It is an honour to you to receive your nomination; and I trust that your nomination, if received, will be a very good one. But if they choose not to do so, and if their choice is not agreeable to me, and if I cannot agree to it, then I am content to have them, and to give them, my consent, to be represented by you. This is not an absurd proposition; but I shall not, I hope, think of it more, than to call it a very important proposition. I will leave the choice of the representatives to you; and that they should be appointed to the House of Representatives.

I know, and can bear out the proposition, that, if there be any other power which has but been delegated by God, it is no power for the Legislature to appoint. And I have the same feeling for this proposition as I do for the proposition that it is an honour to be nominated; and I must hope that, if they choose to do so, their choice is agreeable to me; and I am sure that they will be represented by you.

For it is no thing to hold an election without a majority; and yet I believe, that, if any of the representatives were to elect their members, they ought to have them in their hands; and so, being elected, I feel certain they ought to have them in their hands.

That was the proposal of the senators, who were chosen by the people to be representatives of the people. The senators have only the powers of the people; that is, they have nothing to do with them. I trust that they would have the right to appoint any of their members if they chose. But if any member of the people chose to be an electable member, that member shall be the first to be nominated. It would therefore be proper, that no member of Parliament should be appointed by the people to represent the people.

My fellow-citizens, if I can do justice, to my constituents in New Zealand, that they have voted in the assembly that I have presented to them this day. And in that assembly, that is, the Senate, I cannot think of any person in the entire world who would ever think of putting a man to office, by the people in whom they elected, and not by the people in whom they nominated.

I cannot imagine any person, who has ever thought of that, who would ever have such a view of the public business of a politician as the senators of the New Zealand people.

There is a point I do not say to Mr. Wilson: namely, that the


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Sounds: [TODAY] Dont let the girl go to sleep tonight… [07/01/2015, 1:47:39 AM] Dan Olson: This is not a joke [07/01/2015, 1:47:41 AM] Dan Olson: I mean I’m a troll. [07/01/2015, 1:47:42 AM] Dan Olson: And my mom is a troll. [07/01/2015, 1:47:43 AM] Dan Olson: My dad is a troll. [07/01/2015, 1:47:49 AM] Dan Olson: My mom is a troll. [07/01/2015, 1:47:50 AM] Randi Harper: i don’t need that [07/01/2015, 1:47:53 AM] Dan Olson: I need this. [07/01/2015, 1:47:57 AM] Randi Harper: and she’s really pretty [07/01/2015, 1:48:04 AM] Randi Harper: and she’s fucking amazing [07/01/2015, 1:48:07 AM] Dan Olson: And I was watching my brother’s show and i was thinking “what the fuck” and he’s like “this is going to end badly” [07/01/2015, 1:48:11 AM] Randi Harper: i want that [07/01/2015, 1:48:13 AM] Randi Harper: like a little bit [07/01/2015, 1:48:15 AM] Randi Harper: which means we can talk about all the times I’ve spent on the internet (like when i watched all my favorite shows, lol) [07/01/2015, 1:48:16 AM] Dan Olson: And if my mom is like, “I can’t watch you fucking troll [link] because I’m a troll and she’s gonna end up with a cat that’s fucking hot like you’re fucking with me” [07/01/2015, 1:48:19 AM] Dan Olson: And this will make me realize that [07/01/2015, 1:48:20 AM] Dan Olson: This will be my only real troll job. [07/01/2015, 1:48:27 AM] Dan Olson: and she’ll start talking shit about me [07/01/2015, 1:48:30 AM] Randi Harper: this makes me realize that there are tons of things that people are fucking going to do when the fuck goes horribly wrong [07/01/2015, 1:48:36 AM] Randi Harper: but that’s all pretty easy to do when you don’t have any experience with the internet [07/01/2015, 1:48:41 AM] Randi Harper: you have no idea what you’re talking about [07/01/2015, 1:48:44 AM] Dan Olson: And if I don’t know how to talk about it, I’ll try to troll you for fucking years. [07/01/2015, 1:48:45 AM] Dan Olson: But if I’m not doing it right, I’m fucking wasting my time on this website because I’m not really the same person. [07/01/2015, 1:48:49 AM] Randi Harper: and you’re just saying shit like “I can’t watch you fucking troll [link] because I’m a troll and she’s gonna end up with a cat that’s fucking hot like you’re fucking with me” [07/01/2015, 1:49:04 AM] Randi Harper: and i’ll get mad at you for that because you’re like, “hey, you like that shit” [07/01/2015, 1:49:05 AM] Randi Harper: and you’re like “oh shit, I know I know people that really like that stuff” [07/01/2015, 1:49:08 AM] Dan Olson: It’s actually a really nice piece of work [07/01/2015, 1:49:10 AM] Dan Olson: because you’re kind of a cool fucking dude [07/01/2015, 1:49:15 AM] Dan Olson: because i want to do this for a living, [link] and I’m going to be like fuck this dude for having an honest discussion with my parents because I don’t want to spend my time looking like shit [07/01/2015, 1:49:22 AM] Randi Harper: no fucking problems. i just want you to be cool and like listen to me as a fuck [07/01/2015, 1:49:23 AM] Randi Harper: then you will realize how shitty your shitty ass is [07/01/2015, 1:49:33 AM] Dan Olson: Because it’s not that bad, it’s just you. [


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aretz of a new report on Iran’s nuclear program and whether the country has successfully tested nuclear weapons.

According to the report, the test-firing was carried out by the Iran Atomic Energy Organization, or IROC, which was based in Tehran, with the use of a submarine and two US warships.

While some commentators believe it was a surprise for the Iranian leaders, it seems a much better story for American-led coalition against Tehran, which is trying to drive down their nuclear programme, to put a stop to their efforts.

While this is a far cry from the Iran attack that put the US on strike in December 2014, it shows a growing level of support for the “Islamic State”, which is in desperate need of resources, as the world’s largest terrorist group, and its affiliates such as al-Qaeda.

In the wake of these developments, the Americans have made efforts to stop the war in Iraq from ever beginning. The current US strategy in that area involves bombing the Iraqi cities, not using the air power of conventional aircraft, which have been extremely effective against US troops, but with US drones and guided weapons in place.

The Americans have said that Iran would only use “unspecified, low-flying aircraft” for strike, and have already said they have no intention of using these unmanned planes against its forces.

It is expected that the US will try to convince the Iraqis that a “war against terror” would not work and will be no success.

While the US may well decide that Iran is an unstable country in its own right and is no threat to the US, it may try to force this on the Iraqis, especially as they are one of the most stable countries in the region.

In the meantime, the Iraqi government has expressed its support for the Americans, while Iranian officials are expressing fear that the US is not going to stop the Iraqi invasion and the destruction of their own territory.

In a recent statement, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said that they have been fighting against ISIL for years and that, “since the fall of Baghdad, we have fought on behalf of the Islamic State. We are going to continue fighting on behalf of all of the people who have been the target of terrorism by ISIL.”


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behavior of people in the military. In fact, the US military now uses military recruiting as a mechanism to recruit non-combatants from countries who are being “sold” on a daily basis.

In the post World War II era, there was a large population of the people who lived in the areas where they worked in the military and were working in the local military. When the military and the local communities had little or no experience with the problems facing the people in those areas, it worked best to recruit those people into the Army and the local military.

With respect to the Vietnam War and what happened to the military in Vietnam, we know from our research that the military was in much better shape when the Army got involved. The US military did not experience the economic and military effects of the Vietnam War that our research has found.

In the post Vietnam War years, the military’s involvement was not as bad as the other groups in the War on Terror.

The wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and the Middle East were a “lousy” war that did not change the results of the war. We do not know the military impact of this war.

It is only a question of time until the new World War III, when the military will be involved in the war. But there are other issues that need to be addressed that are important for the future.

One of these is the role of government involvement. A military, which is always trying to lead, needs to give legitimacy to those that do not take care of itself. This is very dangerous for the government to do without.

In this case, what can the U.S. government do with the military? This is how this war came to be, and how to prevent such a conflict from happening.

In the past, the U.S. had fought the Vietnam War because the U.S. Government wanted to prevent another war. The U.S. wanted to prevent further military buildup. The U.S. wanted to prevent the United States from building another warship. The U.S. wanted to do all this, with little or no bloodshed, without killing, wounding, or killing anyone. The U.S. wanted to put up a barrier that prevented the U.S. from building more than 50 ships or bases for the U.S. to defend itself.

And there was one very, very good reason for this. This is a war that started on September 11, 2001. The terrorists had begun building a base on the west coast of the United States. They wanted to build a base, but they didn’t have the materials to make it. So they were moving ahead and building the base. That meant they couldn’t get it. The United States had no option but to leave the country.

A military attack on a base could have resulted in a civilian killing of some 300,000 people. What could have happened if the U.S. Navy had attacked the base. That’s what happened.

So the U.S. wanted to do whatever it could to keep it in place. And so this was a war with a military.

In the military, they are very good at what they do. But they don’t have the money or the manpower to do it. So they need a very good system of government, and they can’t just be happy that the world won’t let them do it.

So in order to do that, the military needs to learn what to do. What can they do to make this war different from what happened in the previous war?

We are not the only ones who have been able to do that. We all know this.

There are other kinds of wars, like World War III. There have been wars like the Vietnam War, World War II, and the Vietnam War. Some countries have successfully fought these wars, while others have failed to do so. So they are all important factors.

To me, all of this is good research. I do not believe that there are a whole lot of good research available on this topic. It is not about politics.

In fact, many of the good research in our area has come from countries in which the military doesn’t participate. They can do some good work, but they need more people, or at least a higher level of support, to do what they are doing.

But if we look at other things, the military is not what it used to be. In fact, many of the military activities in the war are very much focused on the military and not on the private sector, the private sector.

We can learn a lot from some of these military activities, but they are not good enough to do what they are doing. The Pentagon is not the best at what it does, but the military is.

A military war is not a perfect war. In fact, some are better than others.

But we


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curtains.

We’ll take him to the next point of view, or at least we’ll take him through some of them in case we’re going to leave the others on his shoulders…

That’s what it will be.

So when I finally come out, there’s no more of the game. I’ve done a little bit of hard work, and I’ve been getting up early, and I’ve got to get up, and I’ll start playing.

But when I go to sleep, you’ve got to turn to my phone.

You’re going to try to call me back.

It’s always an open phone, with me, my friend, my cousin, my wife.

I’ve got my own book on the back of my neck, with this long white-knuckled pad. It’s about two or three feet long and I think I should have a few of the things in there.

It’s a piece of a letter I’ve written to my dear friend in a corner.

I think I can tell you something that will make you smile.

Just think of it.

Just say something.

And if you think about it, you’ll feel so good about it.

You’ll see a smile, too.

There’s a lot of smiles.

That’s how they look.

I can’t believe what’s gone down.

Because now that I’ve seen it, I can see it.

Now, here’s a little bit more of the game.

What’s next?

We’ll see you at the end of the game, and I’m going to take him to another point of view.

I don’t want him to get lost in the confusion.

So I’m going to tell him where I found him, and then I’ll bring him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will make his life possible.

So I’m going to take him back to that point of view, and then we’ll go over the game and get into it.

Well, this is going to be the point I need to get on.

That’s why I won’t leave him to be alone in his own world, and why I’m going to give him a chance to see the game that will


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IUM in the morning. There is no way that I am going to give them any more help.”

“I told them we will meet you tomorrow morning,” said the young man. He had to leave before he could leave. He was lying in a bed, his face still warm.

“Don’t stay here,” said Sir Robert, “if I can hear you crying I am sure they will say you need help.” He did not want to be seen crying, and, like most people, he did not care for a word of advice. He was going home, and was not in his bed. He did not tell his wife what to say, but they had been talking for a few minutes.

“I’ll hear you when we get there,” said Sir Robert.

“Of course, and please let me hear you,” said the poor young man, who seemed to be trying to get a good word with his wife. “What do you want me to do, Sir Robert?”

“Well,” said he, “my hands were shaking as I was going out, and I saw that my face was almost as bad as the one I was talking to you.”

“Good,” said Sir Robert, “let me do it. You have got to go up. I won’t stay here any longer. It is the only way I am going to help you.”

“There is no more hope for me,” said Sir Robert, “you will not let go of me until you find my face in the worst condition of my hand. I have got to go up to see your father and see what I can do.”

“Why, if you can tell me where your father is, I know it,” said Sir Robert.

“I will go up to you, sir. Go home now. I know your father is dead, but you must go up to the shop or you will be dead for good. I am going to give you my word that I will help you, and I will not lie. It is so much better to help a man who is so much better than you. If you let me hear it, my mother will be sure that she will not suffer from my death. If I know where your father is, and I know his name, I shall take you as far as I can.”

The poor young man was quite taken by this message. He looked round the shop again, and looked at the clock, and thought that at four o’clock he had seen it. Then he left the shop and went to bed, but was not in sight of the little clock.

* * *

CHAPTER VIII.

ROBERT WAS CUT OFF TOGETHER AFTER HE WAS GOING TO LOOK FOR IT.

It was Sunday, November 10th, 1789. A great snow was falling on the ground, and it was a great snow. So he stood down on his horse and rode back to his office, and came to Sir Robert’s.

“I need a place for you to stay, Sir Robert. I have been in France almost two years. Sir Robert will send you a few orders when I come, if I shall be able. I should like to hear your order. It is very good news. I am glad to hear of your order. You are in a great deal of danger. I think you may well do well to go to see them; and you know that I am a very good citizen. Go and do business with them. I shall tell you where the trouble is. You are going to ask them to keep your hands clean and well out of danger. You will be well off. But they will go ahead with you, and tell you everything I have to say. Then, if you think you may be lucky, come to them in the evening.”

When he came home, Sir Robert did not know what he had been doing. He came up to his office and, being on the way, saw a large window in the window, which was very heavy. He looked around, and found Sir Robert’s little mirror and saw that Sir Robert was not on the bed. There was a large window in the window and Sir Robert was in that, which made him very uneasy. He sat down on his horse and rode back to his office.

“I am sorry, Sir Robert, for being in a very bad state of health. I will send you some directions to the best house, and ask them to keep me away from them. I am going to ask a servant to come over from there. I will send you some news to my mother, and we will see you again. You can come home soon. I will be glad to have your orders before I go to see them.

* * *

After supper Sir Robert took a leave of himself to come to see the children. He sat on the sofa with his wife, and a little boy,


===== CHECKPOINT 004 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

propulsion the propulsion system is powered by a single and very precise piston which is electrically charged by a very tiny electric current that is continuously generated by the piston. The piston’s output is increased through the addition of an inertial braking system.

As the engine revs up the electric current flows from the combustion chamber, creating more electricity, the piston begins to produce a rapid increase in horsepower which begins to accelerate it to the maximum potential. At this point the piston is fully accelerated, resulting in a sudden acceleration and acceleration which is followed by the acceleration and acceleration which are reversed by the engine.

The piston begins to rev up again in accordance with the changes in temperature of the air. This is called a thermostat and is the maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston. At the time of this change in temperature, the piston is able to reach temperatures much colder than that of a normal human being. The thermostat keeps the temperature in a constant state for a number of days. This temperature does not change from one day to the next. The piston continues to speed up and speeds up even after temperature increases.

The piston is usually found in the center position at a temperature between 1,000 and 100,000 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F.

A temperature above this temperature can lead to a short but strong contraction of the piston causing a change in temperature. In this circumstance a very precise pulse of the electric current is produced which is then repeated and an electrical current is produced which is again repeated. In this case there is only a short but strong contraction of the piston causing a change in temperature. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

The last three pulses are the pulse of alternating current and the last is the pulse of an electric current. As the electrical current is maintained at a constant temperature the piston increases in speed until a very precise pulse of the electric current has been produced. The rapid increase in speed produces a small but rapid increase in mechanical power.

The piston is often found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F.

The piston is often found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

A temperature above this temperature can lead to a short but strong contraction of the piston causing a change in temperature. In this situation a very precise pulse of the electric current is produced which is again repeated and an electrical current is produced which is again repeated. In this case there is only a short but strong contraction of the piston causing a change in temperature. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

The piston is often found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

A temperature above this temperature can lead to a short but strong contraction of the piston causing a change in temperature. In this case a very precise pulse of the electric current is produced which is again repeated and an electrical current is produced which is again repeated. In this case there is only a short but strong contraction of the piston causing a change in temperature. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

The piston is sometimes found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

The piston is sometimes found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

The piston is sometimes found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F. The first two pulses are the pulse of an alternating current.

The piston is sometimes found in the center position, where it can be found in a position between about 1,000 and 1,800 F. The maximum temperature that can be reached with the piston is about 0,000 to 1,800 F. The first two pulses are the pulse of


===== CHECKPOINT 004 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

arie’s own blog, The Post.


===== CHECKPOINT 004 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

emulator the app will be run in a server-side virtual environment and the host and server should be the same.


This is not supported with any other device that uses the built-in browser.

Some browsers that use the built-in browser will be configured to run in a server-side virtual environment instead of an external server.


For this to work in Firefox, you need to enable the Firefox Developer Center and Firefox Developer Options.


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Firefox Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file.

[ Firefox Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


To enable webkit support for Firefox

Enable the Firefox WebKit extension

Enable the JavaScript extension:

[ Firefox Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


If you use the Webkit library and need WebKit support, use the following settings:


< browser type > < address > < domain > < ip > < port > < host > < node_addr > < address > < address >

Enable Webkit extension:

[ Firefox Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


If you use the Webkit library and need WebKit support, use the following settings:


< browser type > < address > < domain > < ip > < port > < host > < node_addr > < address >

Enable Webkit extension:


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Mozilla Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file.


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Firefox Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file. [ Mozilla Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


To disable webkit support for Firefox


To disable any webkit support for Firefox:

Enable the JavaScript extension:

[ Firefox Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


If you use the Webkit library and need WebKit support, use the following settings:


< browser type > < address > < domain > < ip > < port > < host > < node_addr > < address >

Enable Webkit extension:

[ Firefox Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


If you use the Webkit library and need WebKit support, use the following settings:


< browser type > < address > < domain > < ip > < port > < host > < node_addr > < address >


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Mozilla Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file.


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Mozilla Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file. [ Mozilla Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


To disable webkit support for Firefox


To disable any webkit support for Firefox:

Enable the JavaScript extension:

[ Firefox Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


If you use the Webkit library and need WebKit support, use the following settings:


< browser type > < address > < domain > < ip > < port > < host > < node_addr > < address >

Enable Webkit extension:


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Mozilla Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file.


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Firefox Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file. [ Mozilla Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


If you use the Webkit library and need WebKit support, use the following settings:


< browser type > < address > < domain > < ip > < port > < host > < node_addr > < address >


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Mozilla Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file.


To disable any browser, please enable it in the Mozilla Developer Center, or manually add the following to your ~/.mozilla/conf file. [ Mozilla Developer Center ] Options Disabled = “false”


To disable webkit support for Firefox


To disable any webkit support for Firefox:

Enable the JavaScript extension:


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

thoughts to myself. I was also worried that what they were going for would take them out of my head.

Now, I have spent so much time trying to make a living as a writer, I can’t say that I’m going to get out of this world. But I can’t pretend that I’m not scared. I can’t pretend that I’m not ashamed of being a writer.

I can’t pretend that I don’t care what happens to me. I can’t pretend that I don’t care that I don’t have to be in a situation like this anymore. But the truth is that I won’t go.

I won’t go because I want to be on the side of justice. That’s what I know.

I’ll leave this place,


(From “The Art of Self-Destruction”)


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

professional is to make it in America. We don’t want to do that, we don’t want to sell to other countries, we don’t want to give away what we’ve got. I think we have to get more of that.”

As for the new administration, it is still uncertain what is next, he added.

“It’s just a matter of time,” he said, “and it is very, very hard for us to make sure that we have a good plan.”

Follow @gregorykirkuk


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ilantro of rice and beans. The rice is stuffed with mushrooms, and it makes an excellent spring salad.

I made this toasted rice by adding chopped mushrooms, a cup of black beans and mushrooms to the rice, but I also add some sugar for a crunchier taste. Then I added 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil and a handful of dried cherries.

The flavors of the rice are so strong and so balanced that I was able to enjoy it in my mouth without missing a beat.

And I have to say that the recipe makes a fine accompaniment to a delicious meal, but I would recommend this rice as a simple meal for the morning after a late night meal.

Cured Chicken (2-3 Tbsp.) Chicken Soup

I used a little bit of rice from my previous recipe, but you can use any leftover for this chicken. I have a variety of vegetables you can buy here, and I’m going to pick these up a bit early as well.

The best part about this recipe is that it is easy to make. I will share with you the step by step instructions later when I add some more flavor to the rice.

Here is a recipe I use in my regular Chicken Soup recipes:

Ingredients

1.5 lbs. of chicken breast (I used 1-2 lbs of chicken breasts). I will use the same amount of chicken as my Chicken Soup version of the recipe.

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons cayenne pepper

1 cup of water

1/2 cup of vegetable oil

4 oz. sliced red onions (or 6 cups of tomatoes), diced

1/2 cup of fresh mint leaves, cut into 1/4 inch slices

1/2 cup of crushed red pepper flakes

Instructions

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, combine chicken breast and water, salt, cayenne and pepper.

Put the chicken in a large bowl, cover and cook for 30 minutes.

Remove the chicken from the heat. When the chicken is tender, set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the corn starch, water, cayenne and pepper.

In another bowl, combine the corn starch and water. Add 1 tablespoon of water. Pour into the prepared chicken breast and then place on the prepared skillet. Cover and cook for about 30 minutes.

If the chicken is tender, add 1/4 cup of water. Cover and cook for 5 minutes or until the chicken is tender.

Place the chicken on the prepared skillet and allow to cool on the surface. The chicken should look like it was cooked through when I cut the chicken out of the skillet.

Put the chicken back on the heat. The chicken should look like it has been cooked through.

If the chicken looks too bright, add a little bit of water.

Cook for another 5 minutes until chicken is golden brown, just over an hour or so.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water. If the chicken looks too dark, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too dark, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too dark, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

If the chicken looks too pale, add a little bit of water.

When the chicken is very pale, add a little bit of water. Remove from the heat, put the chicken back in the pan and cover.

The best part of this rice is the color.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, combine rice and chicken broth. I will use the same amount of rice as my Chicken Soup version of the recipe.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, combine rice and chicken broth. I will use the same amount of rice as my Chicken Soup version of the recipe.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, combine rice and chicken broth. I will use the same amount of rice as my Chicken Soup version of the recipe.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, combine rice and chicken broth. I will use the same amount of rice as my Chicken Soup version of the recipe.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, combine rice and chicken broth. I will use the same amount of rice as my Chicken Soup version of the recipe


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

iate the first point of reference.

It’s no exaggeration to say that the first thing you’d notice if you’ve ever encountered a “truckload of” vehicles is the number of people who can get out of a car at any given moment. Sure, the trucks are a couple of seconds to a second, but what you’ll see is those trucks being pushed off the road in the blink of an eye. It’s not hard to see why. And that’s not just because there are fewer drivers.

So why do most vehicles do that? Because there are fewer vehicles on the road in most cities. That is, if you don’t need more than a few cars.

It’s this disparity that means that it’s the drivers, not even the cars that cause the problems.

As of November 2011, the average vehicle count in the U.S. was more than 20,000 vehicles per day. And the average time it took for a truck to leave a destination was over 40 minutes.

If you look at this graph, you can see that as of mid-2012, over 11,000 vehicles were in a truck. And in the last couple of years, that number had grown to over 20,000.

The car problem, however, has become more apparent in the past few years.

Last year, California’s truck law allowed trucks to drive on the roads if they’re on a commercial highway and there are no other restrictions on what they can do. In other words, the law only allowed trucks to pass the limit of how many cars were in their trucks.

With trucking being so expensive and such a serious part of society, even more truck drivers would be inclined to stop or even close their cars for other things. That’s what happened to the New Jersey truck law.

As you might imagine, drivers were very upset when a local TV station reported that the drivers were driving the “truck” without any license plates. That’s a bad move if it means you’re more likely to end up with a ticket or a fine.

It did happen.

In the last few years, the number of people who have been driving vehicles on the road dropped by a whopping 27%, and those people are driving more often than not, and in that time, the number of people making it into the middle of a busy street in New Jersey has actually gone up.

According to a new study published in the journal Transportation Research, the ratio of people making it into the middle of a busy street in New Jersey to people making it through a short distance to a destination in New Jersey actually jumped from 16% in 1999 to 23% in 2012.

But don’t worry, the problem isn’t getting fixed overnight. As of November 1, 2012, there were 23 million vehicles that could be on the road for the next three years.

And according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the city of New Jersey could go from having the second highest grossing auto fleet to the seventh worst if drivers stopped using the roads.

The problem with these statistics isn’t simply that the number of vehicles on the road is increasing. Rather, they also show that there is a problem.

Just a few years ago, the number of vehicles on the road was more than double the size of cars. So if you had a small car, you could have a problem that could easily be solved with a truck.

And that’s the thing about being in your own home. It doesn’t mean that you have to live in New Jersey.

The truth is that in some communities, people who have a lot of vehicles, and they do live in New Jersey, the most important part of their lives, is getting around.

But if you do live in your own home, or in a home that is part of the city that’s part of the city, there’s a lot of things you can do that will keep your vehicle from being towed away.

One of the biggest things is making sure that your vehicle is safe. That is, in many cases, using a good law that is designed to prevent and take care of your car.

It’s not just the rules on where you can take your vehicle home that must be changed.

And of course, that may be a good thing.

Because at some point, a car owner could get the wrong idea and put a lot of money down on another vehicle that is not theirs.

One solution is to look at other solutions.

The most famous is a truck-free neighborhood. Or at least it was designed as such, and not in the way that makes your home look like your home.

This means that there are options that will keep your car safe from any vehicles that make it into the neighborhood.

The easiest and most common way to do that is to call someone who may have a problem with your vehicle.

It’s not


===== CHECKPOINT 005 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Jonas and Rachael.

On his way out of the locker room, he came across two men from the other end of the hall, with two men in their 30s standing next to him. They held up a young woman from their dormitory, who she assumed had been one of the female students in their dorm. Rachael looked at her, then saw a young man in a wheelchair. The two men stood before her.

“What do you have to do?” Rachael asked. He turned, and the two men turned and pointed at him with their eyes.

The two men quickly turned back, but Rachael couldn’t hold the conversation.

“You’re right,” he said, “I have to go, this place is too rough for me.”

When Rachael arrived at the dormitory, he noticed another man with a long beard on top of his head, who looked very much like Rachael, but with a much younger look and shorter hair. This man turned toward Rachael, and Rachael looked back over his shoulder to see him with a long beard on top of his head. Rachael’s eyes widened.

“Come on, you two, let’s go to our room,” he said. “I’m going to kill you and get a better look at this guy. I won’t give up on your life.”

Rachael let out a long breath, and ran back to the room. As soon as he left, he took off his clothes. He began to walk around the dormitory corridors, but after a few miles he was stopped by a large man. Rachael quickly realized he was walking right through the man’s back yard, but he could only walk so far.

“What are you doing out here?” he asked.

“I just got here,” the man replied. “I can’t take you anymore.”

“Is he still here?” Rachael asked.

“Not yet,” the man replied.

Rachael turned, and the two men quickly turned and pointed at him with their eyes.

“What do you have to do?” Rachael asked. He turned, and the two men turned and pointed at him with their eyes.

The two men quickly turned back, but Rachael couldn’t hold the conversation.

“You’re right,” he said, “I have to go, this place is too rough for me.



“Why, I have to go,” Rachael said, but he knew his answer would not be correct. His feet ached as he reached his bed. His body ached from the cold, and when his head hit the pillow he had to put it down with his hands.

When he arrived at his room, he noticed another man sitting on his bed with his legs crossed. This man turned toward him, and Rachael quickly realized he was walking right through the man’s back yard, but he could only walk so far.

“What are you doing out here?” he asked.

“I just got here,” the man replied. “I can’t take you anymore.”

Rachael turned, and the two men quickly turned and pointed at him with their eyes.

“What do you have to do?” Rachael asked. He turned, and the two men quickly turned and pointed at him with their eyes.

The two men quickly turned back, but Rachael couldn’t hold the conversation.

“Why, I have to go, this place is too rough for me.



“Why, I have to go,” Rachael said, but he knew his answer would not be correct. His feet ached as he reached his bed. His body ached from the cold, and when his head hit the pillow he had to put it down with his hands.

When he arrived at his room, he noticed another man sitting on his bed with his legs crossed. This man turned toward him, and Rachael quickly realized he was walking right through the man’s back yard, but he could only walk so far.

“What are you doing out here?” Rachael asked, but he knew his answer would not be correct. His feet ached from the cold, and when his head hit the pillow he had to put it down with his hands.

When he arrived at his room, he noticed another man sitting on his bed with his legs crossed. This man turned toward him, and Rachael quickly realized he was walking right through the man’s back yard, but he could only walk so far.

“What are you doing out here?” Rachael asked, but he knew his answer would not be correct. His feet ached from the cold, and when his head hit the pillow he had to put it down with his


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

weapon, or in their power to create any sort of aetheric, as in some realms, and thus, in the course of time would have a great influence, if, by these arts, they were not already to have been destroyed or disarmed.

In fact, the destruction of the world of the dead by some of the demons, was much more numerous than that which might have been supposed at the present time, or even probable. It was, of course, in all these places that a man could be found, in one part of the world, of an enormous body, or rather that of a very great size, to whom it was impossible to discover the death of the living person. And this was so true, for it could not be thought that even an old man should die, but that one might die on his deathbed, in the same manner as in the case of the body of an old man; that if there be a spirit of death in any part of the world, it might go to the earth; and that a spirit should die there; but, indeed, as much as it was a sort of fire, as some may say, the fire, which it is called by some, may not go down to earth.

It was a great superstition to believe, though not to believe in the death of those whose souls were not dead.

But there was nothing at all to believe in the spirit of the dead.

There was nothing to believe in the spirit of the dead.

And yet, this belief was not to be doubted by any one who was present; but those who were in the place of those in whom the spirit of the dead existed.

Therefore, it was not to be believed in the spirit of the dead, when the spirit of the dead had a power to bring, or cause to be brought, to any place, either in that or in a way, from a place where they had not been present.

There was a certain amount of doubt, and that amount of doubt must not have been to the effect of wanting to get rid of the world.

For such a thing was not to be feared.

And if it should be, it was, that it might be a power, and not a power which could have a great influence upon this world; but, as it were, it could not be the subject of doubt.

For, there was no danger of the world being made worse by a demon.

The world, in other words, was not at all so dreadful to be put to the sword, nor, indeed, in a very wise way; but, rather, it was so very much more a thing that could be brought more or less, if not more, than had been feared; so that it might be in its power to bring things much more or less; so that, in so far as it did so, it would be more or less so horrible than at present.

This, too, was the reason for the wickedness of the demons, for the wickedness of the devil; as the wickedness of the demons could bring them much more misery, even worse, than they would have, if they had been at a lower age.

The very thought of the devil, and those that he induced into him, made the very idea of the devil more abhorrent.

What else could have been he to want? It was no less than the thought of the devil, and the devil.

It was no less than the thought of the devil, and the devil.

It was no more than the thought of the devil, and the devil.

It was no less than the thought of the devil, and the devil.

The devils, however, did not believe in him; they did not believe that he could bring much more misery, even worse, than he might have; for even though these devils had so great an influence upon them, he did not wish to use them, and, rather, he could not do so, than to cause his own death.

Thus, what may be more than this, there was no fear of this world being better; no fear of the devil, or any other evil power; only fear of the wickedness of the demons.

But the whole of the world was so dreadful, that it seemed to be a sort of aetheric, which the demons could bring more or less, even worse than they could, if they were at a lower age.

That is why this, though it might be said, had not any effect upon these demons; and therefore, that, while this was the case, they, by all possible means, could not hope to prevent such a thing from happening.

For, as the wickedness of the devils might bring them much more misery, even worse than they did, if they had been at a lower age, so, too, the


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

chep-ball for the sake of a little taste and to get out of bed and go out and get some work done? Why, that’s my plan!

In his office in the evening Mr. Wilson took up his books, and left the bed. It was dark and wet, but the sky was too deep. He went up into the darkness and began to write, as fast as he could.

The next morning I came to myself. I was so much ashamed of the sight that I forgot my pencils. I thought they were not very bright; I thought they had no sharp point at all; and I was afraid I had lost them. Then I read what he had written and how it was wrong for a man to call a pencil sharp in a letter, and yet write like a dull and cold man.

I could not say much, but I went on reading till I came to the end, in my book, and had the courage to write.

When I was done reading it I saw that it had been broken into pieces, which were scattered about. I took them out, took some, and tore them up again.

I gave myself up for ever, and thought I would have to take out my hands to read the book; and I am not to think it would be much of a trouble. I think that is what is so much more important.

I began to sit and write and sit down. It would be as if I was in a chair. But I had no choice but to sit and write with the handkerchief up. And I took another handkerchief from one side, and put it on my nose, so that it did not go into my handkerchief.

In my handkerchief lay a little pencil and two thin slivers of paper; but that was not enough for me. So I took a thin thread of chalk with me and laid it on my handkerchief, and set it on the little piece of chalk. I told him that I would make some pencils for it. He was much delighted.

And when I sat down with my pencils out I gave him some more ink, which he had left on his head, and placed in his pocket a little note.

And I told him that I would put the little pencil in there. And he gave a little voice, and said,

Why should I send my note out without your note?

That was a very good answer.

Then he told me that he did not want me to put my note in there, for that would be too dangerous. I told him that I could not go back to bed, and that I would have to leave him a little note.

It was a very good reply, and that made me think to myself what it meant to have sent that note.

Then I turned to my little notebook, and began to write.

That was one of the earliest, most pleasing, and most useful books I ever read.

I may be sure that it is a little too much for the human mind, though I think it is true that there are many things that are more noble, and more beautiful, than mere human thoughts.

And if the way it is, I do not know what the man’s reason for writing it is, and whether he can believe that it can be a matter of simple, sensible reason, I am sure that he may have been quite wrong.

But I do not believe that it is wise to write your mind down.

It may, for some reason, be in a little more danger than I think.

When the day came, Mr. Wilson came out to lunch, and when I went out, he came back to me.

“There,” he said to me, “it has been three or four days since I was last read it; and I cannot do anything but wait until morning. What a pity.

Now, how much trouble will it be?”

And I asked him, “Well, I suppose there will be some inconvenience, that would be better if you did not do it sooner. If you would take me to your house, where I will see you some day.

But I know no one to tell me what you will do, and it would be too long for you, if you wanted to do it at all, to go back in that time and put it in your own handkerchief.

Do you think that I may find it as difficult as I do? What an absurd idea, to say the least, and so do I.

I have seen that in the first place the first step to learning the language of this country is to write a little note for you.

A little note can hardly be more valuable than one, in such a situation, as the first step to learning is to read it.

I have been reading it


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

corporations and have also brought us the best jobs in the world. It doesn’t take much to create a country. But I know that we are not all the same, and if we were, we would have more problems.”

But the president’s comments came at a time when the GOP is losing ground in the polls, according to one of Mr. Trump’s top aides.

The president said that while his administration is still learning from the past, he believes America is a better place in a century.

“If you think about it today, this country is better, if you think about it in the present, it is better for America, and I think it will be better for America in the future,” he said, according to The Associated Press.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly said he wants to return to the drawing board in a decade, and he may leave office in a year or two. But some Republicans have begun to back away from Mr. Obama’s plan to cut spending by $1 trillion by the end of his second term.

Republican officials are not yet sure what to do about it, but they want to be able to go forward, said the former House speaker, Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich.

“For my part, I think that this is a good thing, because the country has matured as far as the nation can remember and we have got a whole lot more of it than we want,” Mr. Gingrich told CNN on Monday. “I think we have a real chance of going into a year of a trillion and a half of spending cuts, but I think there is still room to go.”


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

grievances’s existence. It is hard for them to realize that in their own private lives, they are being paid to do their best to help their fellow man. They are forced to choose between their own well-being and their selfish pursuit of self-worth.

In the end, the question must be what it is that leads them to become selfish? How can a man be selfish to a fellow man only to be satisfied with self-interest when his own happiness and well-being are at stake? For if all he can do is seek happiness and security, is that happiness worth the trouble?

What is at stake here is not only the question of self-interest, but of wealth. Wealth, I am told, is in itself a wealth. The whole of human nature is based on wealth, and so in a way its power depends upon wealth.

What is wealth? Wealth is the power of happiness to live. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

I see a paradox. A paradox.

The idea that man has some sort of personal value because of his wealth is absurd. A man who knows that he has wealth, is satisfied with it. It is a feeling that he may have some. It is an idea, I think, that he has at the moment. It is a thing.

We do not live in a world where there are many good people. One has to live with good people to be happy. There is one good man who lives well and lives well; and he is not happy. The good man knows that he is not happy. There is some good man who lives well and lives well; and he is not happy. But if he knows that he is not happy, he has nothing to do.

What then is true of wealth? It is a force. The greater a man’s wealth, the greater a man’s happiness. What is the difference between a well-dressed young man and a rich man, and what do we say when a rich man is unhappy?

I do not deny that men make better money when poor. That is the point. The more rich we make the less poor we make. And if a rich man, with a little wealth, is dissatisfied with that fortune, he will not feel satisfied with it. But if he is satisfied, he will find that he is not satisfied. He will not go into some great business or enjoy it. He will not go to the bank, nor can he take that money.

If that is not true, then wealth is not really wealth. It is not a matter of wealth or wealth, it is a matter of self-interest. It is a power that is inborn in man, and it can be found only in a man who loves his own wealth. And yet the man loves that wealth. He feels satisfied with that wealth, or at least his happiness, if it is true, and he does not feel satisfied with that happiness. If this is true, and if he has no happiness at all, what else can a man do?

What is wealth? Wealth is the power of happiness. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

The man who gives all he gives is happy. And what is happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

The man who gives all he gives is happy. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

The man who gives all he gives is happy. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

The man who gives all he gives is happy. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

The man who gives all he gives is happy. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

The man who gives all he gives is happy. And what happiness? What self-worth, if there is no happiness at all?

I should like to say something more about those men who love their wealth better than they are satisfied with it, but I would like them to say something very different. They love it better because it is better for them to be happy.

But it is not possible that happiness is possible, and there is nothing but self-interest. Happiness is no kind of power or power of self-interest. It is a kind of power that has been bestowed by man. It is man’s own self-interest; it is not himself who is at work.

Man cannot do this, and he cannot do anything that is not his own.

I say, therefore, that the happiness which man can do depends upon the fact that he has no happiness. If the happiness of life is possible, then happiness must depend upon that happiness. I say happiness cannot depend upon the


===== CHECKPOINT 006 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Slovakia.

The U.S. has since announced plans to send 500,000 additional troops to the region.

Meanwhile, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announced a state of emergency to tackle “economic problems,” and he said the U.S. had lost “as much as five-six billion dollars” in exports to Iraq.

The government of Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, who had been sworn in on Friday, is reportedly struggling with the problem of growing poverty.

The government of Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said Friday that the U.S. would take measures to help stabilize the economy, with a goal of reducing the country’s debt and reducing the number of unemployed. (Reporting by John Herskovitz in Moscow and Stephen Cohen in Baghdad; Writing by Kevin R. Brennan; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

נְיֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה שִׁחֹי יִ֨יהוֹ יְהוֹשְׁעִבֵּןִ֙ישׂ יְהוֹשֶׁעֵךְץֽקַל יָ֣קָרָא יֵ֖כְלֹוֹ֑ם יְהוֹכֶל֙ יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יִ֨יהוֹשֶׁעֵךְץֽקַל יָ֣קָרָא יֵ֖כְלֹוֹ֑ם יָ֣קָרָא יָ֣קָרָא יְהוֹכֶל֙ יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יָ֣קָרָא יָ֣קָרָא יְהוֹכֶל֙ יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יָ֣קָרָא יָ֣קָרָא יְהוֹכֶל֙ יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יָ֣קָרָא יְהוֹכֶל֙ יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יָ֣קָרָא יְהוֹכֶל֙ יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יָ֣קָרָא יָ֣קָרָא יֵ֖כְלֹוֹ֑ם יַֽפִךְ֖עֲבֶר֙ מִחֹת־ אֵֽינֶ֣ל עְגִנַךְפֹּ֥ה יָ֣קָרָא יָ֣קָר


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Baxter, the man who’d been there with the boy. He was not even half right; he was right. The boy’s father looked at him with an expression of shock, and looked at the boy as if he’d been hurt. His mother had a black hair in one of her eyes and his cheeks were red. The boy was so shocked that he knew nothing. He got up, looked at his mother, and said,

My lord, what are you going to say about that boy! What are you going to do? I can’t answer. What are you going to do?

Well, you may. He said,

Tell me how to get a child and get an estate.


In this case he did tell me that I was dead.

But I would not have been there. If it had been him, I think we’d have been married, too. And I thought he was going to go to heaven for this, for I thought he was going to be happy and be well-adjusted. But then we went out of the way.

In his hand came an old handkerchief. Then I went in with him; I got the boy. Then I went out of the way.

When we came to our room, it was empty; the door was opened. When I had gone into it, the little boy, when he was three, was already crying. He was lying in the sofa in his cradle, so he could not be seen. I took him to my cousin who was sitting in the back of the room. The mother and father were so silent and stoic they looked at me, and at my brother who was now looking upon my head and arms, and at my uncle, who stood up and gave me the thumbs-up.

“Come,” said the boy, “I’ll tell you how to get a child. It’s a good idea if I can get it. I need to get it fast; it will not last me long. I’ve got my own home; I have no other business than this. Come, I’ll tell you what it is. What do you wish for it, my lord?”

There was no answer. The boy went down with me, ran a hand through his hair, and sat down in my arms.

Then I went into the bedroom, put the boy down on the bed, and got him to the door.

He looked at me with his long nose in his face, and said,

There is a boy, and I believe he’s dead.

I got him to my cousin, and told him all about it.

Then I came in and kissed him, and said,

He is a very good boy; he is beautiful. But my friend, my brother, I will not let him be born again.

He then made me some supper, and took a piece of his blood off of my face.

When he was finished, I told him how to get him fast. I took the bottle from his hand and took a fresh one.

He had put the baby, too, and I gave him his coat.

Then I left, and went back into the bed.

The door was closed; but when I came into it, there was no sign of the boy, or of the father, nor of anything else.

And then the boy looked at me.
I said,

How long did it take to get him into this house?

He said,

Three years; it took about six or seven days.

When I thought it would be good enough, I went in with him and sat down there.

He said,

I had the nightstick and the iron-bound book in my arm.

Then I took the book, and took the letter.

It was written in a pencil. I went to the letter.

“It’s quite sweet. I think it must be your letter.”

And he said,

A letter written in this manner,

To you, and to my mother, that I shall write to you.

I went on, but then I found myself in bed. The letter was gone.

I found the letter in my hand; and when I took it again, it was gone.

And then I sat down there again.

The door was closed; but when I came into it, there was no sign of the boy, or of the father, nor of anything else.

Then the boy looked at me, and said,

My lord, what are you going to do? I can’t answer. What are you going to do?

Well, you may. He said,

Tell me how to get a child and get an estate.


In this case he did tell me that I was dead.


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

hali and Maitreya have an amazing story, which is really fun,” the report said. “I love Maitreya! She is so gorgeous and gorgeous! We will be sharing that with everyone in the neighbourhood. We want to hear from you on how you feel about Maitreya and how you feel about you.”

Maitreya, who is said to be the eldest daughter of Arapaho, is now married to a man named Otho, and married to the same man for three months.

Her cousin, Maitreya’s sister Khyamut, said, “Arafat has a daughter, and is going to marry her. I will get married to her for a fee. It is the most important wedding to us, and she is so beautiful. I am so happy.”


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Was it really that bad, in the first place? Did he get on to the next level of the game? I mean, was he a little lazy? It wasn’t really that bad either. But he was.

There’s that, but it’s just that he’s not. So, I mean, he’s a very, very skilled guy. He’s a very, very talented guy. He plays hard, and he’s not going to run out of energy. But in the middle of the game, he’s very quick and very quick. He’s going to be a little more disciplined, and that’s just going to keep him at his best.

What are your thoughts on the current state of the team at the moment?

I’m not sure how long it’s going to last. I’m not sure that it’s going to go any better. We have got a lot of work to do. I can say, that when I heard we had a little chance last year, that the fact that we’ve still got a pretty good group is amazing, and it’s just so exciting.

It seems like that’s what you’re going to ask him. What do you think?

I don’t know. It would be a great question to ask him.

That was a long time ago. I don’t think he’s going to run into anybody, especially at this time of year. But that’s how he is.

It was a big year for him. He won a couple of games.

That’s why you’re looking forward to that.

That’s why you want to do that.

I love you.

Do you have any suggestions for future teams?

I think I’d be very sad if you didn’t. I mean, I’d love for the other guys to join us, but I don’t think I’m ready yet.

I mean, I was hoping he was going to run out of energy, which I never thought. So, you know, I think it’s good to know that, and that, I’m going to run it out with everybody. But it’s just that I’m looking forward to that, and that’s why I think it’s such a big year.

That’s a good thing. I love that.

So, I think what I’m going to do is, what can I tell you, what can I tell you? Because I think this is one of those years where you have to do it, and I have to go to this town and do that, and you know what, I’m going to give that big smile and do the work that I think is so important.

I know I have to be there with you. I just think that’s something we can all deal with. I just think it’s good to have my family in this.

Do you have any questions for us, do you have any questions or anything else you would like to say?

I’ll just have you know.

I love the boys.

Can we do this?

Yes, I can. I’ll say that.

Can we do this, right?

No, that’s too bad. I’m just trying to make sure that it’s not too much fun.

I think you’re going to have to do that, too. It was a big year for you.

Oh. What? I mean, if we got three wins this year, I think we’d be playing better.

Well, we might play better. I mean, I can’t speak for all three of you.

Well, we did play better than we were playing last year, and I think we’ve got some things to do.

I mean, I think if we do that, the game is going to be close and we will win, but it will have to be a close game and you want to be there with everybody, as long as we can. But I think I could play that well and we’ve got it going in.

Let’s play. Let’s play well.

Let’s play the best.

If we can do that, we can have a good night.

The game was close. Let’s go play the best.

So, what can we do?

Let’s get this team on the right track.

I’m sure we can, yes.

We could, but you can’t. It’s going to be hard. But I think we’ll get it done.

So, that’s all I need to say. I hope you’re all right. We’ll see you soon.


===== CHECKPOINT 007 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Europe. It’s a unique way to say you don’t want to pay for a home or a house that is built for a man, but rather for a man.

Some of this has been my favorite and the one most well-known in the community. It was a man’s wedding. I had the bride have a man’s wedding. This is a wonderful family tradition.

The story of the man with the bridal hat in his hand, but in the presence of his wife who gave him her bride in a dream. When the dream died, the man rose and brought the hat back to his hand. I remember having a conversation with this beautiful woman, but I think she said that she knew he would be there. The day I saw the man again I said, “No.” And she laughed at me, but I went home. She told me that the hat was too bright and she wanted me to have it.

How can you have two or three? The man always goes to sleep, but is there any way I can get him up in his bed before the wedding day? The bride and groom are always gone.

What is an ideal wedding? I can come back and do the wedding, but we need to make it as much beautiful as possible. There are no wedding cakes to be sold in the town, so if there are I can get to do it.

The bride always gives her bridesmaids the best food, so that she can prepare it before she gives birth to them. There are no flowers.

Can you imagine what the bride would do if her husband were a man? He would take his bride and put a few flowers on his head. I could make this into a wedding ring and wear it every night.

I don’t think my father would have been so happy if I went to bed. He would not have dreamed of being with the bride, even with the hat in his hand, and he would have made sure I had the right wedding ring.

How can I have more than one bride? What can we have to do? The bride gives her groom and puts some flowers on his head. I could make this into a wedding ring and wear it every night.

The bridesmaids are always there. If there were no bridesmaids in that place, they would not be happy. But there are three bridegrooms. One of them would be a man, the other a woman.

How do you know that the bride is still there when she leaves her bed? No. She is not looking for her husband. I am not at all sure. Is it true?

I have never known that it happens. When I was married, when I was a bride, I was the only one there and there were only the five of us. How did it happen? It was the last time my wife ever saw me. I could tell. She had never seen me. It is not true.

When I am married, how is it that there is no way I can come back? There are no flowers. I have been married for two years, I am not going back. There are five of us, but we are the only ones that can come back. Why do you think there is no way there is?

It is because I don’t know anything.

When I am married, where is my husband? He is gone, his place is at a distance. And when I am married, where is my wife? He is gone, his place is at a distance. And when I am married, where is my husband?

My name is Boudin. I am an atheist and do not believe in God. My father is a good man, I have been a friend to his brother-in-law. I am quite happy with my life. But if I stay here a long time, what will come out of my mouth? He may say to me that I have been in a bad state. Then he will tell me that I am ill, that I am ill-off, that my life is in the hands of people I am not worthy of to marry. He will not give me a reason to think that I am wrong.

When I am married, where is my husband? He is gone, his place is at a distance. And when I am married, where is my wife? He is gone, his place is at a distance. And when I am married, where is my husband?

How do you know that the groom is still there when she leaves her bed? No. She is not looking for her husband. I am not at all sure. Is it true?

I have never known that it happens. When I was married, when I was a bride, I was the only one there and there were only the five of us. How did it happen? It was the last time my wife ever seen me.


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Awareness and the Meaning of Life

The last of the Twelve Signs is the one that we have been given, that is to say the word of life. It is written, “What you are to do when you die, is that you die by the hands of the Father, that your flesh may bear him, for that is what I am; that is what I am to do, that is what I am to do.” And when the resurrection comes, the world will hear from him; for the world sees, that the Lord hath done for the world. And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

But it is true that in such a state of mind, that we do not feel that we are made for death; but that when we die, or die through sin, and so die out, that we may not see that this is how it is done. It is so much better when a man is in a mortal state than when he is in Heaven. For if a man be in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

In the death of those who have not received this blessing and died of the devil’s hand, there is no salvation in the world. They do not receive the blessing, the love, the holy spirit; but there is no grace to be found there. Thus the Father says, “Wherefore, if thou art all this?”

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he may be comforted and comforted by the grace of the Holy Ghost; that his flesh may bear him.

And when I say to you: Wherefore, if thou art all this?

And that is to say, when a man is in the world, and yet die by the hands of the Father, that he


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

GPUs by NVIDIA is a good investment. However, if you are a developer who needs to use their GPUs in an industry where they are going to have to use expensive parts, this is not the case.

NVIDIA is trying to address the current issue of power supply issues. The PowerTec GTX 980 and GTX 980 Ti graphics cards are very good, but the GTX 980 is more advanced, at least for now. There are still no official specifications, but there is a spec sheet on the web about this problem that states:

In most cases, you would not want to be using more than one GPU to power a single GPU, and it is the use of a dual-GPU system that is why NVIDIA wants to offer more than one GPU on its Pascal GPU architecture. It is more efficient for the GPU to use, and it offers a higher performance over the two GPUs when they are paired together in a single package.

So what is going on?

For many of us, the reason to not use a single GPU is to have more power.

We love the GPU we have, we love the way it does things. But what is the best way to use it?

We want to get to the top in the world of GPU and CPU performance. Let us show you how.

Introduction

NVIDIA’s GTX 980 GPU is a true powerhouse in the GPU and CPU market. It is well known as the world’s first and foremost GPU capable GPU, with a maximum bandwidth of 2.4 GB/s and a peak performance of 1580 MHz on 4.4GHz frequencies. And it is just the right price for its price.

When the GTX 980 card came out in April of 2014, there were many rumors floating around. The news was that it would support 4GB of GDDR5 RAM and a 512MB storage system. When the cards came out at a certain time (February of 2015) some folks said that the 4GB would be for the GTX 980 only. Well, not true.

Now, since there are multiple reports out there that the 4GB would work fine for the cards, some people have been wondering when the 4GB would get out. Some speculated that a more limited-length memory card would be in the works with this, but we decided that the only one that we have yet to test that was the GTX 980 Ti.

And that’s where the 4GB comes in.

With no more than two GeForce GTX 980 cards or more, how do you decide which one is right for you?

Now let’s take a look at how to choose the 4GB that comes in with a single card.

In the video below, we see how NVIDIA has put a GPU clock through the roof with a maximum speed of 1.8 GHz, making it the fastest 4 GB card for the price point.

With three cards, this means that the 4GB might get the most out of the card.

The 4GB is a better than expected performance as a result. At the same time, it helps the card to keep the power consumption to a minimum.

The 4GB card is also designed with three cards in mind. These two cards have the advantage of more memory in a smaller package, while also making the card run more efficiently.

So how do you decide which one is right for you?

NVIDIA chose to use 4GB on the GTX 980.

Why not?

Because the GTX 980 is the second fastest card on the market at the same time.

But the 3GB of GDDR5 RAM is quite the problem.

In order to make sure that this isn’t a bug, the card has to be at least twice as big. In other words, you have to add more GDDR5 RAM to make the card work even faster.

It took the 3GB to be more than a week to be able to run the 2 GB of memory through. So, we can just say that you would have to add more memory for it to be faster.

Now here are the problems with 4GB:

The cards run at a much higher clock speed.

The graphics card is far from fast, and will cause you to run out of power.

The card will take too long to run.

The card will be unstable.

The card may be unstable for a while.

So it’s up to you.

In a nutshell, if you buy the card, go for the 4GB. If you do not, buy the card.

What is the minimum you need to pay for the 4GB?

This is important to know.

If you are looking for the 4GB to power a single GPU and have a single CPU, you may want to add more GDDR5 RAM. But do not go without a good PSU.

This is a question you can answer with two words.


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

tolerant. What is worse, that they could have been forced to do this, and then get out of town?

Well, here’s the answer to that. It’s not a problem. A couple of years ago my brother and I went to the store where my father bought a nice bag. That was a bag for the little girls who had grown up in the town of Little Bunch. They had never even been in town before. They were playing a game called the “toss-on,” when they tried to play it to their father’s dogs. That was a simple game.

I saw my brother and his little girl play it. He was playing and laughing. He just looked at me and he was shaking his head. He was so sad, I can’t help but say I was so scared.

That’s right, my little sister, but you were playing it.

Yes, that was it. I didn’t say what they were doing, but that was it.

Oh, boy.

They went back to town.

That was the last time I saw my brother and my little girl play that game.

Well, then we went to bed. I know I shouldn’t have had any more trouble.

Well, boy.

Good morning, sweetheart.

So, you are here.

There you are, and I have been waiting for you.

You are going to come to see me. I want to meet you again, sweetheart.

Well, no, not right away, because I know I am a little nervous. But you know that I am much more than I should like to think.

Well, sweetheart, here I am.

See? How can I say nothing?

And so, I look you through and see that you are sitting in bed with me.

So, how can I say nothing?

Well, I have no better luck.

So, I just stand there waiting for you.

But you may come back later.

Good morning.

Well, good morning, sweetheart.

See, how can I say nothing?

And so, I look you through and see that you are sitting in bed with me.

So, how can I say nothing?

And so, I look you through and see that you are sitting in bed with me.

So, how can I say nothing?

And so, I look you through and see that you are sitting in bed with me.

So, how can I say nothing?

And so, I look you through and see that you are sitting in bed with me.

Well, that’s right, my little sister, but you were playing it.

Yes, that was it. I didn’t say what they were doing, but that was it.

Well, boy.

They went back to town.

That was the last time I saw my brother and my little girl play that game.

Well, then we went to bed. I know I shouldn’t have had any more trouble.

Well, boy.

Good morning, sweetheart.


Good morning, sweetheart.

Well, look at me, and look at the dog that’s here.

So, what’s that thing I saw?

That he had a huge, huge fat tail.

I know how that sounds.

Is he a big dog, a big dog, or not?

I don’t know. He doesn’t.

It may seem odd. How many dogs have they got in here?

Well, I hope I am not wrong. I just think there are a few more here.

Come now, I’ll make you the man I was looking for. Come and get your dog.

You must come.

If he goes hungry, I will come and take him. But I am going to tell you to stay back and listen.

I am not going to be hungry.

Go on. Come back in time, and please tell me who that is.

If you do, please give him a little more food.

Don’t you love him?

Because he is such a sweet dog.

Come on, come back in time, and please tell me who that is.

If you do, please give him a little more food.

Don’t you love him?
Because he is such a sweet dog.

Come on, come back in time, and please tell me who that is.

If you do, please give him a little more food.

Don’t you love him?
Because he is such a sweet dog.

Come on, come back in time, and please tell me who


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ourney that he had been. It was a day when a man might die before, and with the death of his own hand and death of that of the world, all that he had in his hands was blood.

And I say to him, ‘Do not trust what my lips tell you, that he is not dead before you, but in the light of the day that I have given you, will you make him his heir?’ And he said, ‘O Lord, I am afraid that I cannot tell you, but I tell you that there is in my heart this bitter mystery.

The night came to be a time of great rejoicing. The whole country was asleep, all the people looked up to me; there was no one but me there. All the men were present, for that was my home. There was no man more dear to me than myself. But as soon as they heard of my death, they took away my name. Then the Lord told them, “Go, I am going away; if you will, go and die.” I was dead! There was no one with me save the Queen. And I am going to die, and I will not leave her to die, but she will not die till I come back again.

The day came, and I went and saw her at the door of the palace. They were all in white robes and in bright green robes. The Queen was here, dressed like a wise lady. The gentlemen were all dancing and dancing with the Queen. At the end of the night, she came out in shining green robes. They were both dressed up with white robes. I saw her, and was like a man who had gone through all the dark nights of his life. And she was so beautiful, and so radiant. There was an empty chamber, and I saw the Queen in the moonlight, smiling, and the Queen so full of love. And in the moonlight I saw this beautiful flower that had blossomed into a lovely tree.

But when the stars lightened upon my house, I was filled with joy. But when I went to the chamber, I saw what I should see and heard nothing of what they were saying. They did not say anything except, “Come, let us look into the night again.” And so I left them and went back to sleep.

I was there again, and at the gate of the palace there came to me a messenger from the King, and he said to me,

“O my lord, give me the peace of life which I did not give you.

And how shall I send thee back again? Let it be for thy sake that I send thee back.

When I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to my cousin, whose life is more precious than your life.

In this letter I say to myself: ‘Come, let us look into the night again.’

And when I return, I will send thee a letter with an open grave to you, to give to


===== CHECKPOINT 008 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

swings

The first and most significant aspect of the situation was how close the two men came to ending a two-week truce that could have been as much as a hundred miles apart.

That the men of Britain and France were to break off this week, even before a scheduled dinner, is not yet confirmed. It may well depend on whether it is the first in a long line of such interminable meetings, or if, as the historian says, the situation in France is at an end.

The French have not yet responded to the news. They are likely to meet next week or next month.

The fact that the two sides have lost sight of each other, and are already making a terrible, agonizing choice, is nothing to say that either will not return to the brink.

The English and French have already made all but a few feeble attempts to negotiate their fate, while the British are content to remain at peace, and they must not fear any of this, if they so wish.

It is only a matter of time before their fate will be decided. It is therefore imperative that these two men, when they meet, be well acquainted with the situation.


===== CHECKPOINT 009 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Includes the following to make your own, and make it into a more complete set!

The Art Of Cooking

I love cooking. I mean it every day.


Now, you are a little more than a small little child. It is your job to love cooking. It makes me feel happy, helps me to eat more and help me to enjoy my food.


Your husband is not a man, but you know that.

The way you see it, your wife is a child of the past. I want her to see me, to know that I love her.

If you have that gift, I would be all for it.


I love you so much, and I love you so much too.


But I don’t want you to give me the gift of that past I have yet to enjoy.


I need it now.


How about some good food and some good music?


Or, if you want me to listen, please come and talk to me.


Love, honey!


You do not have to leave me this evening.


I should like to get out of bed early if you want me.


Well, that’s not my fault, though I should like to stay with you all the rest of the afternoon.


I love you so much too.




And I want you to come back later and see what I think of you.


How about a little supper, if you’d like to stay a little longer?


If that isn’t enough, you can have a little supper and let me know when it’s back.


I am sure it would be good.


I love you so much too.





Well, I mean tonight, and it’s been so long since I last ate a meal, so I have to say that I love you.


But I have never had so much of your spirit.


It’s your wife.


And I love her so much too.


I love you so much too.




And I love you so much too.


Well, I am sure it would be good.


Well, I mean tonight, and it’s been so long since I last ate a meal, so I have to say that I love you.


But I have never had so much of your spirit.


It’s your wife.


And I love her so much too.


I love you so much too.


I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


And I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


And I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too.


Well, I love you so much too


===== CHECKPOINT 009 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

->


The way they are working this year, if we take these results straight out of the bank with the assumption that they’re all correct, it could end up being more than half a billion dollars, and I believe it is.


The other thing to note, that if there is no effect on inflation from the addition of VAT or any other tariff that we get from exports, I believe we should make it that much lower.


And my point is, that it’s not only going to be easier for our businesses, but it’s going to be easier for the consumers and for the producers.


I would like to put it to a head again. It’s not only going to take that much more time, but I think it’s going to be as good.


I think the world is going to get so much more advanced with the internet. I believe it will be a major source of new information.


What I have to say is, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I believe that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone.


And I think it’s going to save us.


I would like to say that I think it will be a major source of new information.


I think the world is going to get so much advanced with the internet. I believe it will be a major source of new information.


I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone. And I think it’s going to save us.


I would like to say that I think it will be a major source of new information.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone.


And I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone. And I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone.


And I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone.


And I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone.


And I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology.


I think that is something that is going to be really helpful to everyone.


And I think it will be able to have a big effect.


And when you are able to see people doing their business from an early stage, then it will be just as good.


And I think that you should never doubt that.


Well, I have to say, that it’s not just a matter of the internet, it’s going to be the most advanced technology


===== CHECKPOINT 009 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

595 of each;

*

* @param $dims $pos /* new positions */

*/

/**

* A list of arrays to store the position of the leftmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of array to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of array to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of arrays to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of arrays to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of arrays to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of arrays to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of arrays to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A list of arrays to store the rightmost position.

* @param $pos *array

* @param $dims *array

* @return

* @var array

*/

function empty_lines ( $pos, $dims, $pos ) {

foreach ( $pos as $dims => $dims => $pos ) {

$dims = array ();

}

return array ( $pos );

}

/**

* A


===== CHECKPOINT 009 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Sour on a hot pot of water, sprinkle a little black salt on top, then press it into your bread.

As a last ditch effort to ensure our food is the best we can, it is best to put the lid on, rather than in the other direction.

I think this is a bit of an attempt to do so, considering that I am not a big fan of cooking for myself. But I think I have a way of showing some appreciation for that, and you may wish to see what I am trying to say.

Let me try to make this more palatable to you.

This may not be a very healthy food, but I think we can all agree that it is a great food. If you were ever at the restaurant, what would you think of this?

Or, better yet, what would you say of this?

What are these things that you do with it?

It can be pretty simple! It is almost as simple as your typical grilled meats and it is very tasty.

Well, this may be quite simple. Let me just say this.

I think this food tastes like grilled meat.

I may be wrong, but I think I know what I like. If you were ever at the restaurant, what would you think of this?

Or, better yet, what would you say of this?

Well, this may be quite simple. Let me just say this.

I think this food tastes like grilled meat.

I may be wrong, but I think I know what I like. If you were ever at the restaurant, what would you think of this?

Or, better yet, what would you say of this?

Well, this may be quite simple. Let me just say this.

You are very lucky! It is what I want to do with it, and you know how to use it wisely.

You can make it a few weeks before the end of your visit.

My food here is always fresh, but you will never know anything else than that.

If I was a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a few weeks later, I would just make it again!

What am I to do with this?

Well, what is this?

I cannot tell you how often I eat this. It has been a regular habit.

Well, my food is always fresh, but I will never know anything else than that.

If I were a little lazy, I might add that a


===== CHECKPOINT 009 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

黒, Márcia 犬夜叉【原作版】 Cthugha Cthugha, the Chaotic Flame Cthulhu Cthulhu, the Nightmare Incarnate 百式観音, Netero 百族の長プチョヘンザ 百鬼呪怨, Jed Cu Chulainn, the Green Lancer Cuaton Cunning Trickster God, Loki Cupid Curse Inclined Dragon Caller, Ideal Cursed Dragon Curved Blade Brave, Kopis Curved Blade, Kopis Cutting-Claw Green Dragonbound, Sylvie 矢部明雄 知性・キン肉マンスーパー・フェニックス Cyberdragon Valhalla Cyclone Devil Dragon Cyclonic Demon Princess, Fujin Cyclops Cymophane Jewel Princess, Sheen 玻璃の風龍王・リンシア 玩具修理者, Pitou 瞬刻の白龍喚士・ソニア=エル Da Qiao & Xiao Qiao da qiao & xiao qiao Dabura Dagda Dalmascan Dancer, Penelo Dancing Flame, Amaterasu Ohkami Dancing Light, Amaterasu Ohkami Dancing Mad, Kefka Dancing Seiryuu Princess, Karin Daredevil of Dark, Gamble Mage Dark Angel Metatron Dark Angel, Lumiel Dark Archdemon Lucifer Dark Armor Dragon, Gacrux Dark Aurora Dark Bell Star Angel, Lumiel Dark Blue Skydragon, Nirai Kanai Dark Cat Dragon, Black Nyadra Dark Companion Dragon, Doltos Dark Courier Kurone Dark Crimson Armor Dragon, Ruchbah Dark Dog Dragon, Chinwandra Dark Dragon Knight Dark Dragon Swordsman Dark Flame Ifrit Dark Gear Dark God, Tsukuyomi Dragon Dark Golem Dark Golem Mk.II Dark Golem Mk.III Dark Guardian Dragon, Scion Dark Holy Skydragon, Shangri-La Dark Ice Leviathan Dark Imp Dark Insect Dragon, Mutecocoon Dark Knight, Cecil Dark Knight, Gravis Dark Kouryu Emperor, Fagan Dark Liege, Vampire Duke Dark Mech General, Hysferzen Dark Mechdragon Technician, Barbara Dark Mode, Pepper Dark Moon Goddess of Serenity, Arianrhod Dark Night Skydragon, Elysium Dark Orb Dragon, Eyro Dark Pengdra Dark Plant Mechanical Star God, Spica Dark Red Skydragon, El Dorado Dark Samurai Dragon, Nobunaga Dark Scroll Dragon Dark Shibamaru Dark Shining Divinegon Dark Sky Star Dragon Emperor, Defoud Dark Sprite, Cattleya Dark Star Crusher Machine, Despharion Dark Sun Deity, Ra Dark Sword Dragon Knight God, Sherias Dark Text Dragon Dark Twin Star Tiamat Dark Warchief Dragon, Shija Dark Winged Machine, Demonius Dark Wizard, Dill Sirius Dark Wood Fafnir Dark Wood Skydragon, Horai Darkdragon Vritra Dark-Eyed Dragon Monk, Xuanzang Darkness Goddess, Hera Dragon Darkseid Darkstar Goddess of Bliss, Uruka Dark-Winged Star Angel, Lumiel Daruma Dashing Dandy, Maeda Keiji Daughter of the Hell Phantom Demon, Romia Daughter of the Tentei, Rin Daunting Dragonbound, Li Daunting Wraith Dragonbound, Li Dawn Bride, Izanami Dawn Calm Indigo Dragon Caller, Sumire Dawn Sky Sun Dragon Caller, Kanna Dawning Dragon Caller, Sonia Gran Daylight Suzaku Princess, Leilan DD-Arch Guardian DD-Behemoth DD-Dragon DD-Dragonewt DD-Drake DD-Guardian DD-King Behemoth DD-Magick Archer DD-Poison Enchanter DD-Saurian DD-Skeleton DD-Skeleton Lord Deathly Hell Deity Jackal, Anubis Deathmace Mechanical Star God, Denebola Deathstroke Deathstroke + B. Staff Decisive General, Zhang Fei Deep Chimera Deeply in Love Newlywed, Akechi Mitsuhide Deighk Deliberate Rebel, Akechi Mitsuhide Delphyne the Dragon Princess Demolishing Creator, Shiva Demon Destroying Star Angel, Ruel Demon Flamedragon Kagato Demon God Masterion Demon King Masterion Demon Leader, Shuten-doji Demon Slayer, Susano no Mikoto Demon Slaying Goddess, Durga Demon Viper Orochi Demon Who Commands Flames, Shishio Makoto Demon-Clawed Monster Cat, Cath Palug Demonic Gentleman of Heresy, Azazel Demonic Gentleman, Azazel Demonic Moon Dragon Caller, Satsuki Demonic Phantom, Hashihime Demonlord Belzenlok Dende & Porunga Denebola Depraved Magi, Judar Desert Fist Firestorm God, Set Desire Garden Dragon Caller, Shazel Desiring Princess of Hell, Sitri Desperate Courage, Jean Kirstein Destroyer Dragon, Apocalypse Destroyer God, Shiva Dragon Destroying Bow Steel Star God, Australis Destroying CyberDragon, Diadem Destroying Goddess of Power, Kali Destroying Thunder Dragon, Dorva Destroying Wing Dragon Emperor, Sherias Roots


===== CHECKPOINT 010 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

808

Dennis

Bobby

Bobby – I am back, and I will take you up on that offer.


SOMETHING

Bobby is dead! It is gone, and you will be dead as soon as I am gone from here.


DUSK

He knows that.

PENTATIVELY

Why do you think I must die?


SOMETHING

A fool knows not where to hide his lies. He hath done his duty.

PENTATIVELY

You know the truth, but not the love of love.


DUSK

Come, tell me it will not vex me.


DUSK

But what did I tell you?


SOMETHING

I said that I was afraid of the Lord and that I should give it to you.

He did speak of him.

DUSK

But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But what did I tell you?

I said that I was afraid of the Lord and that I should give it to you.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But what did I tell you?

I said that I was afraid of the Lord and that I should give it to you.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK

If I would have kept thy word, and let him die for this cause,
But thou hast not yet laid thy hands upon me!


DUSK

Thou art not to know how thou hast gone. But I am sure my faith in thee shall be the first thing to take him up.


DUSK

What do thou say of me? Is my confession true?

PENTATIVELY

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But what did I tell you?

I said that I was afraid of the Lord and that I should give it to you.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But what did I tell you?

I said that I was afraid of the Lord and that I should give it to you.

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK

If I would have kept thy word, and let him die for this cause,
But thou hast not yet laid thy hands on me!


DUSK
Thou art not to know how thou hast gone. But I am sure my faith in thee shall be the first thing to take him up.

PENTATIVELY

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK

But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK

I pray thee. Hast thou not gone mad at me with thy vow?


DUSK

Thou art not to know how thou hast gone. But I am sure my faith in thee shall be the first thing to take him up.

PENTATIVELY

He did speak of him.

DUSK
But are you not a fool? And yet thou hast gone so far; tell me what I told thee.

He did speak of him.

DUSK

Dare I say that I was afraid of the Lord?


DUSK

How dare thou think I be?


DUSK
Then die; you have made thee a prisoner, and you will be dead at last.



DUSK
I pray thee. Hast thou not gone mad at


===== CHECKPOINT 010 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Flowers’s body, he was a pale, pale young man, with long, grey hair, and brown eyes. He had a great deal of gold, and in the silver in silver he found the gold, so that he should be said to have a great fortune; in the gold, the beauty of gold; in the silver, the beauty of silver; in the gold, the beauty of silver; in all these, the glory of heaven; and all these in their wisdom.

But now, the great news comes to this. As we have said, there were no gods but those that are in the heavens above us, and those that are in the earth below us. And behold, these are these; and in my days I shall make them all. But I am not yet ready to speak of them. For these are the names of all that dwell below me, for there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me.

Wherefore, O Lord, be upon earth, and be with me, to keep me all. And to give you peace, I will let this day come, when the day of judgment shall be, and there shall be no god but that is in heaven above me, who is in heaven above me, who shall sit with me, and be with me, to give peace to all that dwell upon earth.

And, O Lord, I have come to make a covenant.

And for ever and ever, I will make you holy, O Lord, by the power of thy holy breath. For the breath of thy breath speaks and is holy, which is like the words of a dove, in its breath is not a living breath; but you, with my counsel and your counsel, will redeem the soul of man with thy life and the life of my soul, so that it may become the holy of everlasting life.

How then, O Lord, have I found in heaven that thou art blessed, and I in earth that thou art cursed?

For heaven, wherefore I say to thee, Thou art not blessed, and I myself am not blessed, but thou shalt not be cursed, because I am of the earth.

What, then, O Lord, hath this matter displeased me?

As it is written, I have said, O God, not in this world.

Now, whence art thou come?

How, then, have I come?

The heavens and the earth, and all that dwell below me, and those that dwell within me, and those that are above me, and those that are above me, behold, these are these;

For behold, this is the name of all these that dwell below me, for there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

Now, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there is these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

Thus, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

So, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there is these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

Thus, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

So, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

Thus, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

So, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

Thus, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me, and they are my God.

So, O God, whence is this that thou hast spoken?

For behold, there are these in heaven above me, and they dwell there above me and dwell in heaven above me,


===== CHECKPOINT 010 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

uce

Nuts and Bolts

Nuts and Bolts:

I have made you a new sort of man; it is a very serious subject.

Nuts and Bolts:

The earth hath not had a man who hath not made it, for

you are the most holy man,
so give me your help.

Nuts and Bolts:

Thou art a god to me.


NUTS AND BRULT

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face
is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,

their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am all that my heart should wish,
more and more, when a little fire
doth to make light to mine face,
and more and more, when the night air
beats me in a golden glow,
and it is the most blessed I know.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGLES

My name is Lipscomb.

My eyes are the stars of heaven; my face

is a mirror of mine own beauty.

My name is Lipscomb, and my eyes are the stars of heaven,
their stars tell me what I am and how I am pleased.

I am not so rich and poor as I myself am.

I am my own poor servant.


NUTS AND BRIGGL


===== CHECKPOINT 010 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Oblivion is no more.

I’m not sure, but this is the world that he’s going to live in, the world where he’ll live in, and the world he’ll die in, or this is the world he can go back to.

What am I going to do with my life? What am I going to do with my soul?

I know I am dead, and yet my spirit lives here. It is nothing but my death,

And yet my soul lives here. It is nothing but my death,

And yet my soul lives here. It is nothing but my death.

And yet my soul lives here. It is nothing but my death,

And yet my soul lives here. It is nothing but my death.

I shall return to my father, or I shall be buried.


It seems to me now to be a lie, that he is in heaven.

He may be dead, or dead, or dead,
Not the damned,
But some more, not my father, or my brother,
For that I can no longer live
My thoughts will be like a thousand words in their uttermost bosom,
In their everlasting groanings, till I die.

I shall die, and I shall not be forgotten,
Or my ghost may haunt me,
Nor my death, nor my soul,
But I shall never be gone.

In heaven is not hell, but this heaven
Where no man shall stand, nor man shall die.

It is the light in heaven that keeps them out,
And the nightingale in heaven, that is so great,
And I, the child of light,
Stand by heaven to the sun,
In prayer to the father of the earth,
And there be light, and in my death,
There be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my soul,
And there be light, and in my soul,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my soul,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,
And there be light, and in my death,


===== CHECKPOINT 010 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

punch, which is the only thing that stops you from getting hurt.

The last thing you need to do is ask if your girlfriend is drunk. If she is, I can talk to her.

It is a pity if she is not drunk; she was born to the poor.

She will help if I bring her out of bed.

I should be thankful that she is not hungry, or that she is not so heavy-headed as I am.

My mother is so drunk that it might be good if I tell her what she was doing with this little girl.

If she says nothing to my face, I should be content.

If she says, “What can I do?” I should give it a try.

If she says, “I have an aunt or a cousin who would not help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two maids that would not help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who would not help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two brothers and one cousin, who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two brothers and one cousin, who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two brothers and one cousin, who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two brothers and one cousin, who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,” I should be satisfied.

If she says, “I have two sisters who are not able to help me with this,”


===== CHECKPOINT 011 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

grew.

And there he went and married again, but she was to the Prince of that kingdom with the rest, not to be found among the rest.

And if any man be a man of a hundred years of age, and is not of that nature, and hath been born before a great fire, and yet be with his mother in this flesh, then a man can be blessed by his mother; and for many ages, have we not found that he is blessed in this way.


Chapter 29


How then does thy mother love thee? Is it not the love of her husband, or is she of such an affright?


What I mean by that is this, that she hath not, to be sure, been a widow for some years, and married a man after her death; and yet hath not been married, either in marriage or in life.


But she hath been blessed by his father, because she hath been living; and in that case the Prince of heaven hath not left her.


And how then?








For there is yet none married before marriage.


But if any man be married before marriage, he hath been blessed.


How then shall his father, if any married before marriage be a virgin?


Or should he marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


Or should he marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


Or should he marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


Or should he marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and he hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and she hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and she hath no husband?


And if he should marry a man before marriage, he hath been blessed?


And if he should marry a woman before marriage, she must be a widow, and she hath no


===== CHECKPOINT 011 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

prec

As in the case of the Greek letters B and C, they were not in the same letter, and are not in the same letter.

O, when were you born?

How do you know this,

Or the other world?

Do you wish to hear this?

The truth is, I will send you back to Athens and take you back
To my chamber; I cannot bring you back;
But if I should do, you will tell me to keep my promise
To take my stay.

Blessed are you!

I did not give your father so many letters to read.
But you do send them back to my chamber;
To tell me to keep my promise, and you should leave
There.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there

And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind
When you shall have seen me before.


Doth not it more true,
That which I am bound to speak
Upon your lips than upon the bosom of my mother,
Which I, when she dies, must kiss in the kiss of kisses.


Blessed are you!


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind
When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there

And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips. And yet I must be there
And remember it.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.


O, thou wilt think my vow may have a bad effect upon your mind

When you shall have seen me before.

This letter is from my own lips.


===== CHECKPOINT 011 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Falks of the Church of God.

[pg 179]

A new order is instituted in this church. The same Church as before that is to be found in the Church of God. The church of God, the church that is to be found there, is made without a holy faith or church of any nature, that hath ever been found in the world.

It is said, that the new order which we have been ordered to make may be an everlasting and everlasting order, both holy and just.

And to be sure, it is true, I am so, for I have no religion, that I can prove anything.

In the same day, which is our Sabbath day, is our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

And now, when there comes near, I will, in holy manner, pronounce upon him, and beseech him, that he may be delivered from this commission, which I am a stranger to.

This is the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.

O, what shall I say? That it is not true, unless it be true, and we may be reconciled.

If, therefore, my heart believe me, and that I myself, when he speaks of him, is not a man of this world, but a child of some world, that I may be saved from death, that I may be sent hither and thither, that I may be bound therewith, and therefore that I may redeem these souls from all wrongs, and from those that would kill me.

My heart, therefore, may be saved in this way.

Now that I think not, I will take no counsel in it, but I shall show thee what I think best; and I shall give thee a word, when I have told thee what I will tell thee.

I beg you, therefore, if thou art not afraid, to repent.

Do therefore, that I may be comforted.

Do therefore, that I may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul! O heaven,
For I am now a body so blessed, so free from all that is detestable, so blessed, so strong, so sweet,
And in so glorious an infinitude, so strong, that even thy breath is full of air.


[pg 180]

It is now, therefore, to-morrow, and the holy day before that, when thou art come hither, in haste, that I may be in the place where thou speakest;
Thou hast done it, and now, as thou thinkest fit, return and have my help.
Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.



[pg 181]

I do not wish that my name should be misused.
If, therefore, I confess my sin,
Then no one would think I would do that.
But my heart, therefore, may be comforted.

Do therefore, that I may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul!

Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.

But if I confess my sin,
Then no one would think I would do that.


[pg 182]

If my heart be comforted, then no one would think I would do that.

But my heart, therefore, may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul!

Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.

But if I confess my sin,
Then no one would think I would do that.

But my heart, therefore, may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul!

Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.

But if I confess my sin,
Then no one would think I would do that.

But my heart, therefore, may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul!

Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.

But if I confess my sin,

Then no one would think I would do that.

But my heart, therefore, may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul!

Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.

But if I confess my sin,

Then no one would think I would do that.

But my heart, therefore, may be comforted.

By this thou art comforted, O my blessed soul!

Thou art here, O heaven,
To make thee to return.

But if I confess my


===== CHECKPOINT 011 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

revoke the verdict.


===== CHECKPOINT 011 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Pict,
I am not sure what your name is; what do you mean by that, O ye fellow
Of all the nations that have been
To-day, but are not yet.
The sea, though I cannot help wondering;
The sky; the air, if I speak
Nor breath, but only breath
With those that move
I swear are my sworn followers
That they shall never again be in this world.


Beware lest my tears might be cut
By thy tears; behold, she hath spoken a word
To my face; for she is a widow
In such a state that it hath left her.
It is but for this that I say; but look
To her; she hath yet the strength
To cut up my arms and her face
With all my flesh, yet so full
That it hath lost the strength to do battle
With her; yet she hath shown me love.


A maiden of old,


I have the honour of greeting you with a kiss,


And I will be thy husband and your wife in a new world.
A bridegroom I never heard of.


Farewell.


[Exit.]


BARLIA

Good-night,


BARBARA

What is it, Dear lady,


Gentlemen, what is this?
My name?


GARNEY

My father, sir.


BARLIA

What is it, Dear-mother,

Gentleman?


GARNEY

O, be gentle, my lord;


BARLIA

What is it, dear Lord?


GARNEY

My lord, this is a new thing.


BARLIA

A good tale?


GARNEY

Ay, ay!


BARBARA

Is your father a man?


GARNEY

Not yet, indeed.


BARBARA

My lord, I pray you that you may give him this name.

My lord, what of that matter?


GARNEY

O, do not deny my dear lady’s counsel
To come hither and make him my bridegroom.

Henceforth, you may stay in our house and take this upon your hands.
I do not have any wife to call,
I do not think you might be here.


BARLIA

O, where is my father?


GARNEY
Not yet, indeed.


BARBARA

Is your father a man?


GARNEY
No, not yet.


BARBARA

What is it, Dear-mother,

Gentleman?


GARNEY
Ay, ay!


BARBARA

O, be gentle, my lord;

BARLIA
What is it, dear Lord,

Gentleman?


GARNEY
My lord, this is a new thing.


BARLIA

A good tale?


GARNEY
Ay, ay!


BARBARA

Is your father a man?


GARNEY
Not yet, indeed.


BARBARA

My lord, I pray you that you may give him this name.

My lord, what of that matter?


GARNEY
O, do not deny my dear lady’s counsel
To come hither and make him my bridegroom.
Henceforth, you may stay in our house and take this upon your hands.
I do not have any wife to call,
I do not think you might be here.


BARBARA

O, where is my father?


GARNEY
Not yet, indeed.


BARBARA

What is it, Dear-mother,

Gentleman?


GARNEY
Ay, ay!


BARBARA

O, be gentle, my lord;

BARLIA

What is it, dear Lord,

Gentleman?


GARNEY
My lord, this is a new thing.


BARLIA

A good tale?


GARNEY
Ay, ay!


BARBARA

Is your father a man?


GARNEY
No, not yet.


BARBARA

O, where is my father?


GARNEY
No, not yet.


BARBARA

What is it, Dear-mother,
Gentleman?


GARNEY
Ay, ay!


BARBARA

O, be gentle, my lord;

BARLIA

What is


===== CHECKPOINT 012 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Cabs, a well-known Catholic in his day who had been married for ten years at the Bishops’ Palace. He had been a faithful friend of mine and made me the forefather of my own son. I felt it my duty to give my consent to take him away, to marry him. But the marriage was no way to be done. This morning I went to him and told him that I was married to a very bad man, and that I was guilty of his murder.

He knew, indeed, all I did but say it.

It would be wrong to say, not with all my heart that I had been so foolish as to murder him.

But it was true. I should have done it for him with as much as I could.

By that time he had made up his mind, and had been thinking at home; and I saw that the great heart of him who, with his own flesh, would have slain me at the last minute.

I was now gone.

I lay there in bed.

As soon as I had gone, I spoke to my husband.

He told me that I had a letter to you, from the Duc de Saint-Maggio, who had come into Paris, and asked me if I should give it to him.

I did.

I took it as he told me and gave him the letter, which was in Paris.

I told him that the letter was to be written to his mother, the lady of Saint-Peters, in consequence of a letter that he had had to write to her last night.

I said I did not know of it; but I could not speak of it to myself without a smile,
because it was so holy,
and I told him, with all the holy grace of God,
I would send it to him with great joy.

He gave it me and sent it out to his mother,
in order that my father might get on with the other ladies.

My father was with the poor man, in that he had to tell him how I had come hither.

I found the letter in Paris and immediately gave it to him.

He got it, gave me some physic, got in himself and left,
and was gone to the palace with his father,
and I did as he told me and did nothing for him.

But I must have my proof, for I cannot be deceived.

I will prove it to my father.

It is true. I am an uncle to a dear sister.

My father says I am ill,
and there is no help to be had.

But this letter, which I am bound to give to my father in his absence,
would be very much worse than any death that I should give to him,
and that he should find me.

And if he does, I will let him know where to find it.

But I am not to give him death.
I am to tell him where to find it.

How can I be sure?

I am sure there is no way; and what more must I fear than the love and friendship of my dear brother?

JULIET.
What love do you think you have?

JULIET.
What love? It is love, or love that makes us think.
What is love that makes us think?

JULIET.
It is my father; he makes no use of the word.
JULIET.
What love do you think you have?

JULIET.
It is love, or love that makes us think.

JULIET.
It is love, or love that makes us think.

JULIET.
I have never known love in my life,
for I cannot, in the flesh, say nothing,
I have never felt it.

JULIET.
Why, if you know, must I tell you how love is?

JULIET.
Because the world speaks of love,
and if love is love, it is only love.


JULIET.
A love made of words may be hateful.
JULIET.
But love cannot be hateful, that, when it is made, may be sweet.

JULIET.
If love is sweet, I am not guilty,
for it is the true form of love.

JULIET.
I love you with much. I will love you with so much.

JULIET.
Good God, I love you so much that I will not.

JULIET.
O, good God, I love you so much that I will not.

JUL


===== CHECKPOINT 012 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Laurel of Troy, and with him the king, a little after three hours’ journey, and yet not being so late, went back with some company, and there was to him a lodging-room, full of such ladies that the lord did not see, and with him came his wife. And there they were all.

Then it came to pass that the little child was all grown. They came to him and spoke to him so very well that he thought he saw the little child. And they both came with him; and there came him into the world, and they were the two sons, to whom all these things were confided, and made holy, and gave to all their kinsmen holy drinks of honour;

Then he made merry, and with much joy made haste before he could come. And having been there, the Lord was glad; and at his word, his countenance shone with joy, and he came out of the room;
And there stood the Lord again, and there took his hand in his, and said,
Good gracious king, have mercy upon me.

And the little child spoke aloud the joy of joy, and said,
Lord, be merciful.


CHAPTER XXXI.—DULGLO.

Hast thou not my eyes in darkness, O my bride, having the eyes of the sun in heaven with me?

I am not so merry as thou:
Nor yet so merry as thou.
And it came to pass that the little child was all grown; and they came to him and spoke to him so very well that he thought he saw the little child. And they both came with him; and there came him into the world, and they were the two sons, to whom all these things were confided, and made holy, and gave to all their kinsmen holy drinks of honour;

Then he made merry, and with much joy made haste before he could come. And having been there, the Lord was glad; and at his word, his countenance shone with joy, and he came out of the room,
And there stood the Lord again, and there took his hand in his, and said,
Good gracious king, have mercy upon me.

And the little child spoke aloud the joy of joy, and said,
Lord, be merciful.


CHAPTER XXXII.

DULGLO.

Dost thou not my eyes in darkness, O my bride, having the eyes of the sun in heaven with me?

I am not so merry as thou: Nor yet so merry as thou.
And it came to pass that the little child was all grown; and they came to him and spoke to him so very well that he thought he saw the little child. And they both came with him; and there came him into the world, and they were the two sons, to whom all these things were confided, and made holy, and gave to all their kinsmen holy drinks of honour;

Then he made merry, and with much joy made haste before he could come. And having been there, the Lord was glad; and at his word, his countenance shone with joy, and he came out of the room,
And there stood the Lord again, and there took his hand in his, and said,
Good gracious king, have mercy upon me.

And the little child spoke aloud the joy of joy, and said,
Lord, be merciful.


CHAPTER XXXIII.

DULGLO.

Dost thou not my eyes in darkness, O my bride, having the eyes of the sun in heaven with me?

I am not so merry as thou: Nor yet so merry as thou.
And it came to pass that the little child was all grown; and they came to him and spoke to him so very well that he thought he saw the little child. And they both came with him; and there came him into the world, and they were the two sons, to whom all these things were confided, and made holy, and gave to all their kinsmen holy drinks of honour;

Then he made merry, and with much joy made haste before he could come. And having been there, the Lord was glad; and at his word, his countenance shone with joy, and he came out of the room,
And there stood the Lord again, and there took his hand in his, and said,
Good gracious king, have mercy upon me.

And the little child spoke aloud the joy of joy, and said,
Lord, be merciful.


CHAPTER LXI.

DULGLO.

Dost thou not my eyes in darkness, O my bride, having the eyes of the sun in heaven with me?

I am not so merry as thou: Nor yet so merry as thou.
And it came to pass that the


===== CHECKPOINT 012 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

reduces.

To make sure they get their reward, he keeps them in his hand to store the food, and they use it.

Then we give their back to the palace, where they may be satisfied.

Then, if they shall return the promised food, let us go.

JULIET. I bid thee rest your weary limbs.

BASSE.
How well thou be refreshed,
Have I not yet told thee that thou art so weary?

JULIET. I shall not.

BASSE. That may be.
JULIET. I think I know, too; but shall I?

JULIET. I will take my word that I am so good.

JULIET. Shallst thou think of some other remedy?

JULIET. Well, let me hear it.
JULIET. Is not that so.

JULIET. Come, come hither;

ULIET.
Dost thou not help me with a tale,
To make thy life be merry again?

JULIET. I wish thee would, and tell me more.

JULIET. Such are the words of heaven,
When thy lips have found them dry,
Which thou speakest thus to me.

ULIET.
Ah, dear fellow, dear, if thou art so merry
That I shall do all I can for thee
And yet to come to do so I should be a little mad.

JULIET. Ah! thou wilt tell me so, shallst thou?

JULIET. What dost thou do?
I do thee some hurt,
Some hurt that, indeed, is not quite so;
That we say is good; and yet it is not so;
For, how wouldst thou, in that state of such a state
Have a child so far back to him?

JULIET. If, therefore, thou wilt believe in such things,
Or if, at the end of some such journey
You will think I would not help you,
That would not help me either.

JULIET. It is the most gracious remedy.
How can such a poor remedy be found?
JULIET. It is that that, that I think thou knowst.
Is it not? What are these, O friend,
That tell thee that I cannot help thee?

JULIET. No, I am not so poor, for love and good reason.
My husband, therefore, has found me rich;
That must be the case.
For I know not how to speak so fair a word,
Or how to do so much good.
Thus, then, I will tell thee my best,
And, with the help that thou giveest me,
Be merry and happy.

ULIET.
O, my dear fellow, my true love,
Is not yet dead.

ULIET.
O, my dear fellow, my true love,
Is not yet dead.

ULIET.
O, my dear fellow, my true love,
Is not yet dead.

ULIET.
O, my dear fellow, my true love,
Is not yet dead.

JULIET. Ah! so well, O lord, thy love,
Is not yet dead.

ULIET.
Good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good.

JULIET. Ah! so well, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good.

JULIET. So you will, well, be merry, shall we?

JULIET. O, I am not so poor, for love and good reason.
My husband, therefore, has found me rich;
That must be the case.
For I know not how to speak so fair a word,
Or how to do so much good.
Thus, then, I will tell thee my best,
And, with the help that thou giveest me,
Be merry and happy.

ULIET.
My loving sweetheart, farewell,
My poor man!

ULIET.
My loving sweetheart, farewell,
My poor man!

JULIET. O, my beloved, my dear friend!
My loving sweetheart, farewell,
My poor man!

JULIET. O, my beloved, my dear friend!

JULIET. O, my beloved, my dear friend!

JULIET. O, my beloved, my dear friend!

JULIET. O, my beloved


===== CHECKPOINT 012 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Zo. But if they can’t stop it, I ask for help from you, and help you from all that will come to bring them a cure; that is my request.

O Lord, if you can do it in spite of the world?

He will hear no more of my words,
Nor will I weep for him,
Nor say, How dare thou, that I have been such a fool?

O thou treacherous and treacherous, that so callest me from heaven?

O treacherous to my reputation; a true friend
To tell me, O sweet love;
Why, so often when I see thee at home,
Is it so strange that I do so
In my love, that my face is that of another
And that I am that of another?

O love, love. O love, love.

Doth that be my sweet kiss?

The kiss of a love, that is but one.

I should not kiss that of that sweet name.

But there it is.

Come, thou my sweet sweet knight, that love
Is so sweet, and so lovely
That it shall never kiss me again.


I do not know how long it shall be,
Nor if it be that I might ever have it.

But here I go again,
Thy love is gone, and that kiss
Is sweet.


O, how love lives.




Now I am come, Romeo.





BRIANET
What then, what did I think of that?




ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter
Who is with me, that I may not say so
I would not be.


ROMEO
What?


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief
That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter



ROMEO
Why, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief
That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
That that is so true,
That is that which I am.


ROMEO
What?


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
That that is so true,
That is that which I am.


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
Thou art the enemy,
And I have sworn in my heart to come


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
Thou art the enemy,
And I have sworn in my heart to come


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
That that is so true,
That is that which I am.


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
O, what did I think of that?


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


ROMEO
Well, Romeo, no matter


ROMEO
By thy trusty cousin, Romeo, in my grief

That I might, that I may tell the truth.


===== CHECKPOINT 012 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

equal, if not for a single point. So this is an easy way to think of them, if you ask me:

If the sun were so heavy and dark, that every single day I would feel like a tomb

It would be so much better than my life. Therefore I want some fire.

And if the sun were so heavy and dark,

How much would I want some fire?

A lamp of some light, of some light that

Is too bright and too bright.

Hence, let us go, and tell them how much we want.

The one where we speak shall be my name.

Let the night be no more night than all night.


JULIET

Thou hast found this light-work I am all in love with,
And not in love with my enemy.


JULIET

And why art thou so gentle in this, madam?


JULIET

I have discovered thy beauty.


JULIET

And tell me thou, Madam, if this were love,
I should kiss a maiden, and not a maiden
In love with my enemy,
And marry her, and kiss her till she dies.


JULIET

I have found thy beauty.


JULIET

I have found thy beauty.


JULIET

And tell me thou, Madam, if this were love,

I should kiss a maiden, and not a maiden

In love with my enemy,
And kiss her till she dies.


JULIET

My love hath lost thy sight, and I hate thee,

And am sorry for thy conduct,
That hath caused me such sorrow.


JULIET

How sad is this, and how late is that day?


JULIET

What are you sad for?


JULIET

I feel no grief at such griefs,
That is what thou sayest.


JULIET

My love hath lost thy sight, and I hate thee,
And am sorry for thy conduct,
That hath caused me such sorrow.


JULIET

Why, madam, this is not the love you have
That is more dear to me than my love!


JULIET

Madam, thou art mad; madam, you hate to have a love-child.


JULIET

Why, madam, you hate to have a love-child.


JULIET

Ay, madam!


JULIET

I was not meant to say, that I had a love-child;
That you were born again in love.


JULIET

What then, madam, do I love to love thee?


JULIET

That is not true.


JULIET

Ay, madam!


JULIET

You love not my love, so do I,
And, if thou hateest such a love
A man is but in love with me,
Which love I would die for, if I were not a lover

Therefore I love thee and love thee and thy children.


JULIET

O my love, madam, do thou not love the woman with whom I am married?


JULIET

O my love, madam, do thou not love the woman with whom I am married?


JULIET

Madam, is love an affliction?


JULIET

Ay, madam!


JULIET

I am no love.


JULIET

Why art thou so gentle in this, madam?

Because thou art love.


JULIET

Ah, love! what am I to thee?


JULIET

That is not true.


JULIET

Ay, madam!


JULIET

You love not my love, so do I,
And, if thou hateest such a love
A man is but in love with me,
Which love I would die for, if I were not a lover
Therefore I love thee and love thee and thy children.


JULIET

Madam! have pity on thee!


JULIET

Madam! do thou not love the woman with whom I am married?


JULIET

I am no love.


JULIET

What am I to thee?


JULIET

That is not true.


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

achievable

Why not add the new functionality to prevent other plugins from working the same way

How is this possible?


Step 1

It took me an hour and a half to do this step. It took me an hour and a half to do this step.


Step 2

What if the plugin does not exist yet?


Step 3

My question is what is the best way to enforce the plugin

No way.

If I am already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?


Step 4

I wonder if they think this is worth the effort, and how?


Step 5

So, are there any plugins that you feel are worth it?


Step 6

How can you help?

Just ask for help, and we will get there!


Step 7

This is what I can do!

I need your help to do this.


Step 8

And I have help too.

I need your help to do this.


Step 9

So I am done with the plugin.


Step 10
What if you think it might be worth the effort to add it, or that it might not work?


Step 11
So it may be!


Step 12
Do you think I can do this?


Step 13
I am satisfied.


Step 14
If you are in my shoes, please do not send me this, this is not the solution I need, and it is not the best solution

I hope I can find.


Step 15
Good luck.


Step 16
If this is a bad answer, I will use it.


Step 17
What if the plugin does not exist yet?

If I am already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?

If you are already satisfied with it, and this is my answer, why do I need to work with others to do it myself?


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

lord for making that point. I think it might be better to talk about this more broadly. I think in light of the many of the other recent incidents, especially of the rape allegations made against her in a past life, and my belief that that makes her more vulnerable than I do, I think she should be subject to much more severity in the future. But to give you an example, let me just say that if I were to take any further than I do now in my own life and say that, let me ask you this: When I heard the news, I was sure I would be a victim. Then I thought I would say a word to her. I said nothing. When she came to see me, she said she was so much better than I imagined she would be.

JULIET: Did you ever take her word for a word when she told you that?

JULIET: No, I never.

JULIET: Which is why you think it is such a good thing?

JULIET: It is good.

JULIET: I am sorry I can not.

JULIET: But you do not think I shall hear that I shall not hear what you say again in a day or two.


Back to Top of Page

JULIET, PENIET, JULIET

JULIET!


JULIET: And so to be content.

JULIET: That is to say, you have not made the acquaintance that I have of those whose lives, you may well believe, have been so happy, that they are so well nourished and happy.

JULIET: O, that is no such thing, but I am so much worse than they.

JULIET: How are you going to be content with that?

JULIET: O, that I can be content with my present affliction in the future.

JULIET: How come you, poor lady, to lie with me till the end of this night?

JULIET: What a poor fellow you are.

JULIET: I am content.

JULIET: But I will not be content with that.


Back to Top of Page

JULIET, PENIET, JULIET

JULIET!

JULIET: And so to be content.

JULIET: That is to say, you have not made the acquaintance that I have of those whose lives, you may well believe, have been so happy, that they are so well nourished and happy.

JULIET: O, that is no such thing, but I am so much worse than they.

JULIET: How come you, poor lady, to lie with me till the end of this night?

JULIET: What a poor fellow you are.

JULIET: I am content.

JULIET: But I will not be content with that.


Back to Top of Page

JULIET, PENIET, JULIET

JULIET:

JULIET!

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

JULIET:

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JULIET


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

catering and I have no regrets,” said her father.

He gave me the book to read and did not return it until she gave me a new one in a couple of days.

I bought him a new one last week, and she asked him if I should read it again. I said no.

He says he did, and that she did give him another book.

But I love it. So far, she said, she is satisfied with it.

I have nothing but thanks.

But, at last, I cannot speak of her.

She does not look at me.

Then I saw her in the night, and she gave me an answer,
And he said, farewell.

In the morning, I went out into the garden, to the west, where there is a house, that I have found at the other end of the garden; and I did take the book which she had promised me.

Here I sat and talked with the lady, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went out again to her, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went, and she gave me another look that was very sweet, and she gave me an answer that I love, so much so that I cannot think of making myself any more like her.
And, therefore, I have not thought of ever having a man that I do not love.

For she did say, farewell.

In the morning, I went out into the garden, to the west, where there is a house, that I have found at the other end of the garden; and I did take the book which she had promised me.
Here I sat and talked with the lady, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went, and she gave me another look that was very sweet, and she gave me an answer that I love, so much so that I cannot think of making myself any more like her.
And, therefore, I have not thought of ever having a man that I do not love.

For she did say, farewell.

And that, for my love, shall come, but that which I love.

In the morning, I went out into the garden, to the west, where there is a house, that I have found at the other end of the garden; and I did take the book which she had promised me.
Here I sat and talked with the lady, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went, and she gave me another look that was very sweet, and she gave me an answer that I love, so much so that I cannot think of making myself any more like her.
And, therefore, I have not thought of ever having a man that I do not love.

For she did say, farewell.

And that, for my love, shall come, but that which I love.

In the morning, I went out into the garden, to the west, where there is a house, that I have found at the other end of the garden; and I did take the book which she had promised me.
Here I sat and talked with the lady, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went, and she gave me another look that was very sweet, and she gave me an answer that I love, so much so that I cannot think of making myself any more like her.
And, therefore, I have not thought of ever having a man that I do not love.

For she did say, farewell.

And that, for my love, shall come, but that which I love.

In the morning, I went out into the garden, to the west, where there is a house, that I have found at the other end of the garden; and I did take the book which she had promised me.
Here I sat and talked with the lady, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went, and she gave me another look that was very sweet, and she gave me an answer that I love, so much so that I cannot think of making myself any more like her.
And, therefore, I have not thought of ever having a man that I do not love.

For she did say, farewell.

And that, for my love, shall come, but that which I love.

In the morning, I went out into the garden, to the west, where there is a house, that I have found at the other end of the garden; and I did take the book which she had promised me.
Here I sat and talked with the lady, and she gave me a look that was very sweet.
Then I went and went, and


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Gilbraham and all his daughters, and we have this, that a new law, that you may speak with me, may be in my breast, as a husband.

Now the king will go into prison, and if he shall do so, I will let him go.

JULIET.
I will take him out of my mouth, and he shall be dead.

ROMEO.
If you believe, that I will tell my daughter that I shall take her with me, and she will not, she will live.

JULIET.
In truth, I am sure she will.

ROMEO.
I must live.

JULIET.
And it shall be, that, if you were to be married, I should kill you, and live again.
ROMEO.
Is she so ill that she shall not live?

ROMEO.
She hath slain me.

JULIET.
She hath slain me.

ROMEO.
She hath slain me.

JULIET.
So do I, and yet I refuse the death of the marriage.

JULIET.
And yet she hath slain me.

ROMEO.
That is not such a sin.

JULIET.
How can she say I do not kill her, and yet she do live?

ROMEO.
She hath slain me.

JULIET.
She hath slain me.

ROMEO.
By what means, therefore, O, when the husband dies?

ROMEO.
For what cause do they kill their husband, that I should have slain her husband, if they had not slain me?
JULIET.
If thou shouldst slay her, I would die.

ROMEO.
But that which thou cannot, thou shalt die, O my lord.

ROMEO.
But that which thou cannot, thou shalt die, O my lord.

JULIET.
Then, behold, this is what I have done in thy name.
I will murder thee for this, if thou believe me not.

JULIET.
The earth is mine own, and thou shalt not slay it, for I am the living.

ROMEO.
And so it is.

JULIET.
I am the living.

JULIET.
I have made thee live, in the manner of a man.

ROMEO.
O amorous lady, O amorous daughter.

JULIET.
’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’
’’
Hath thou done this, O amorous maiden, whose womb is in thy breast?

ROMEO.
If thou shouldst slay her, I would die.

But that which thou cannot, thou shalt die, O my lord.

JULIET.
That which thou cannot, thou shalt die, O my lord.

JULIET.
What amst thou to do with this woman, that thou dost give to me?

ROMEO.
’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’
Hath thou done this, O amorous maiden, whose womb is in thy breast?

’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’
Hath thou done this, O amorous maiden, whose womb is in thy breast?

’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’
’’
Hath thou done this, O amorous maiden, whose womb is in thy breast?

JULIET.
That hath been thy word, thou knowest.

ROMEO.
Good. Then, when thou wilt, come the marriage of thine husband.

JULIET.
Wherefore?

ROMEO.
By what sin dost thou make the husband a wife to a woman?

JULIET


===== CHECKPOINT 013 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

wives and the like.


As the lady is gone, and her lady is gone,

Turn back to earth to see what she shall come again;
But if the lady is gone again,
And that lady is gone again,
As long as I do not take her by the hand again;

I stand up and leave her alone.


And thus farewell,


Nurse

Thy love,

Shall thou not show mercy to her with that which I now?


Or to kill her
As much as thou dost wish me to,
But with that I shall slay the lady.


’’

The Lord

She hath gone,
And left her there,
Where she is dead.


’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.


’’

The Lord
I shall not do this if I could;
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

And now let me tell thee,
Forgive her for what she hath done,
Forgive her for what she hath done in my name,
Forgive her for what she hath done in my heart.


’’

Hilary, father! What love will I make thee that thou mayest find me,
Forgive me the wounds that I have inflicted on thee?


’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Hilary, father! What love will I make thee that thou mayest find me,
Forgive me the wounds that I have inflicted on thee?

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Hilary, father!
What love will I make thee that thou mayest find me,
Forgive me the wounds that I have inflicted on thee?

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Hilary, father!
How dare I tell thee that I am in thy bosom?


’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Hilary, father!
What love will I make thee that thou mayest find me,
Forgive me the wounds that I have inflicted on thee?

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Hilary, father!
Hail what thou wilt, father!


’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.

’’

Hilary, father!
Do not be content now.
I will kill thee.


’’

Dost thou think I would not do this if I could?
Not if thou knewest what I would do.




===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

dependencies, you might want to add the following file to the top of your repository:

# dnf -s http://www.rabbitcheese.com.au/packages/index.html

Now that you’ve added the files, let’s call it a day.

Naming

Here are some notes for the purpose of naming.

RabbitCheese is a ClojureScript-based, ClojureScript-powered, and ClojureScript-only game. It can be run in a ClojureScript REPL and the game is also available in the.NET library.

In this example, I have made a new name, named RabbitCheese.

It will take place on June 26, 2013.

Jupyter

In the future, RabbitCheese will be available on a new website, named Jupyter.

If you have a simple and simple RabbitCheese app you might like to try it out.

The first thing I do is take a look at my RabbitCheese.js file and change it.

It is still a simple RabbitCheese with the same code, but it is faster and it is even easier to add.

To have a quick and simple test that you can run with some help from the help of some great RabbitCheese experts.

And for a more advanced use, like testing out some other new things, this is where I will be happy with it.

What is it?

It is a simple Javascript and ClojureScript game.

To learn more about it, read this blog post.

And for more, read a post on how to make an app like this.

What are the basic requirements of a game like this?

This is the point where I need some help with my game. I have two needs, one of which is that this is an actual game, and I want to know where to place it and where to buy it.

I want to make sure that I have the right price.

I want to make sure that I have the right price.

I want to make sure that I have the right price.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run. I want to make sure that I have the right price for it.

I want the right price for the game to run.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.

What are the things I need for the game to do?

All these are important for a game to run.

So what is the game going to be?

I want the price I need for the game.


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

yarn, and the other was to do the rest. He saw that the young man was no more than a blacksmith, and did not seem to care at all what made him come in.

Tharja stammered with fear. “What have I done here?” he demanded. “It is a little business, and I am not here to be a help. I have gone to make some news. I think it may be a tale of some horrible misdeed, or I should say some rude news. This is a man of some renown. Come and tell him I am here to buy you some tea. Here I will see what you will do, and I am going to buy what I shall.

It is not the first time thou hast been ill; I know not what thou hast said, nor I but hear you say, but I know thou art gone, that I should think thee worse than I do. O thou fool, that didst not mean to help a beggar. Be away, come to the ladies and tell them thy face, where I am now, and that thou dost hurt me. Go, thou fool; but go on. Stay till I come.

JULIET.
I love thee as well as I love thee.

JULIET.
Thou art too strong to take, I think, and thou art too harsh. What shall I do for thee?

JULIET.
I would make thee mad, but methinks thou love is far too sharp for love to be gentle.

JULIET.
What madman is this, I am sorry?

JULIET.
Ay, madman.

JULIET.
By thee, madman, the matter is too sudden. Ah, but thou art too bold, and I too much like thy art.

JULIET.
Tout fear, do thou love my father more than mine?

JULIET.
Ay, madman, that should be thy doom.

JULIET.
Madam, if that be so, I know it is too late. Then tell me, thou madman, what shall I do for thee?

JULIET.
Give me thy hand, and thou shalt have it.

JULIET.
The boy is dead.

JULIET.
And so, if thou art dead, then give me thy hand again.

JULIET.
The devil hath so many times slain so many, yet he hath not yet slain so many.

JULIET.
How many shall be slain, how much must my hand be?

JULIET.
How much shall my hand be, or must I leave the child alone?

JULIET.
How do I know? If thou art dead, give me my hand again.

JULIET.
I should be proud, if I had such a hand, and yet thou art not.

JULIET.
Is it not the devil, that dost thou think thou must die?

JULIET.
By my power, but thou hast got so much strength in me, I think I am bound to die.

JULIET.
Give me my hand, and thou shalt have it,

JULIET.
The child is dead, I tell thee.

JULIET.
And so, if thou art dead, then give me thy hand again.

JULIET.
Give me thy hand again, and thou shalt have it,

JULIET.
And so, if thou art dead, then give me thy hand again.

JULIET.
O thou art gone. That thou art gone, that thou dost have slain me, that thou art not.

JULIET.
I should have been proud, if I had such a hand, and yet thou art not.

JULIET.
Is it not the devil, that dost thou think thou must die?

JULIET.
By my power, but thou hast got so much strength in me, I think I am bound to die.

JULIET.
Give me my hand, and thou shalt have it,
JULIET.
And so, if thou art gone, then give me thy hand again.

JULIET.
Give me thy hand again, and thou shalt have it,

JULIET.
I love thee so much more than I would have thou didst to kill me.

JULIET.
What madman is this, I am sorry?

JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ancestral-owned school where he worked as a janitor.

He spoke with a passion that would rankly serve him for the remainder of his life.

His last words were,
“Till I die,
And I will never forget you.

Gift of heaven,


As much for you as I wish to be remembered.”

Some days passed without hearing him speak,
And he never spoke again.

Some days before, in spite of this, he wrote to Ollis
That she should keep his letter in memory of him,
To be read and remembered by his friends.

Then I came upon this gentleman, and made my acquaintance.
I saw that the young man was with many of his acquaintance.
Thereupon I went to the door of his company,
And with a smile that made me feel so dear
I forgot where I was.
This dear and gracious gentleman was Ollis,
A dear and gracious father, but one with such an ungovernable temper
As to make me forget him.


CHAPTER XX.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


I came upon a noble gentleman,
And he spoke with a passion that would rankly serve
Her. I thought she must die.

Some days before, I went to the door of his company,
And with a smile that made me feel so dear
I forgot where I was.
This dear and gracious gentleman was Ollis,
A dear and gracious father, but one with such an ungovernable temper
As to make me forget him.

Then I came upon this gentleman, and made my acquaintance.
I saw that the young man was with many of his acquaintance.
Thereupon I went to the door of his company,
And with a smile that made me feel so dear
I forgot where I was.
This dear and gracious gentleman was Ollis,A dear and gracious father, but one with such an ungovernable temper
As to make me forget him.

Then I came upon him, and made my acquaintance.

I was struck in the heart,
Like a storm in the night:
I found him dead, but she had a face so rich
That she gave me up with joy that day.
And she made me come back again,
And I buried him there in peace.


CHAPTER XXI.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXII.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXIII.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXIV.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXV.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXVI.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXVII.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXVIII.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXIX.
I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXI.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXII.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXII.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXI.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXI.

I am in a dream. A dear old maid,
Who was in an act of honour
And in a dream, I should be slain.


CHAPTER XXI.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXI.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXI.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXII.

My father must not have been Romeo.


CHAPTER XXII.

My father must not have been Romeo.


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

trele’d business of selling goods with other, more or less valuable merchandise’s in the world, to be sold to their friends?

If they did not sell, what would they use? Then what would they do?

No, they should not sell, but go with their kinsmen, and make their way to the nearest store.

’And so I’ll tell thee what follows.

O, O thou wilt not tell me what I should or should not tell thee?


It is to have thee tell it that I have come and bid thee farewell.


O, thou wilt not tell me what I should or should not tell thee?



Why art thou so ill-feeling?

What is thy sin?

How many times will I hear thee say it?


What will I do?

Give me thy word or make me a new handmaid,
Which is the only remedy I can devise against thee.

O, thou dost wish to tell me.



I am thy maid.


GEOFF.

I’st be gone, and thou have left me.


FULA.
O, and I beg pardon, my wife.

Is my husband dead?

My brother’s love.

My dear cousin.


O, and I beg pardon, my wife.

Is my husband dead?
My brother’s love.

My dear cousin.

This letter from my father
’s cousin, that thou hast written to me this evening,
And hast set me to this present letter,
As thou art well and well comforted by the rest of thy company,
I have a letter from him, and I intend to give it to him.
If thou hast no letter, or thereabouts, I should be very sorry.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.
Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

I am with thee, and thou hast laid hold thereof,
Thou, and thy love.

If thou hast no letter, or thereabouts, I should be very sorry.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.
Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

Thou hast laid hold thereof,
Thou, and thy love.

If thou hast no letter, or thereabouts, I should be very sorry.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.
Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

Thou hast laid hold thereof,
Thou, and thy love.

If thou hast no letter, or thereabouts, I should be very sorry.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

Thou hast laid hold thereof,
Thou, and thy love.

If thou hast no letter, or thereabouts, I should be very sorry.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

Henceforth, stay, and comfort me, and my dear cousin.

FULA.

Nay, farewell, my dear friend.


FULA.

I am not sorry, my lady.


O, and what is thy father’s love?

My dear cousin.

A good man.

A good mother.

Good man.




FULA.
O, and what is thy father’s love?

My dear cousin.

A good man.

A good mother.

Good man.


I am not sorry, my lady.



How long will I wait till I shall be dead?

Or till I shall be buried?

Or till I shall be cut off?


And is this good news?



Ah, thou hast made a bad news, thou wast so merry
That thou didst not say much.


GEOFF.
Come, let me stay.


F


===== CHECKPOINT 014 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Christ. Therefore, what is the father of such men? He hath laid his hands upon my head; and this hath left me the ghost of this woman,

JULIET.
O, what is this that thou didst not hear? For how dost thou think thyself unworthy?

JULIET.
What I will make of thee, shall I tell thee. I will die.

JULIET.
What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was my friend slain?

JULIET.
Didst thou tell me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.
What didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was my friend slain?

JULIET.
Didst thou tell me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.
What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?
JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?
JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No.

JULIET.

Was the death of a brother, or the murder of a brother?

JULIET.

What, then, didst thou call me that? No


===== CHECKPOINT 015 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Transfer in. I am so sorry that you were displeased with my conduct that night. I have nothing but thanks for this present.

Constantine,

Hast thou never met a man like me that dares perchance come to me and say,
That thou hast sold my soul for love, that thou art so wretched? Hast thou ever sold thy soul? What shall I say?

’Thou art a saint, thou wilt speak that word again.

O, Romeo,

’I have heard thy name, and am thou so very sick that thou art almost dead,
The man doth speak of thee, and yet, for thy sin, thou
Call me again.

Come,
Constantine,

I beseech thee from thenceforth,
Thy love lives with me. Let it be, O Romeo,

’I beseech thee from thenceforth,
Thy love lives with me. Let it be,

I am the Romeo of you

’O the gentle, the holy Romeo,

’I am his friend; and I beseech thee from thenceforth,

Thy love lives with me. Let it be,

I am the Romeo of you.

Now, Romeo!

The more I think of it, the more I tremble;
For if I were so, the poison I use here would poison my breath
’as well, since I am so sick, as I am now.

’This thou art the enemy,
’Madam, thou art Romeo,’
And I beseech thee from thenceforth,
Thy love lives with me. Let it be,
I am the Romeo of you.

Now, Romeo!
The more I think of it, the more I tremble;
For if I were so, the poison I use here would poison my breath

’as well, since I am so sick, as I am now.


O, Romeo!
The more I think of it, the more I tremble;
For if I were so, the poison I use here would poison my breath

’as well, since I am so sick, as I am now.


Ah, sweet Romeo! Here we come, for the holy Rosary,
And I shall, in that last week, play her part in her own behalf.

What? But the Rosary?

’Not till I have got a better view of thee from the westward!

O, dear father, this is more bad than a sin,
Nor is thy love more impure to me!
The Rosary may tempt thee with thy last love:
That is my vow, and thou shalt not refuse.


O, sweet Romeo! Here we come, for the holy Rosary,
And I shall, in that last week, play her part in her own behalf.

What? But the Rosary?
’Not till I have got a better view of thee from the westward!
O, dear father, this is more bad than a sin,
Nor is thy love more impure to me!
The Rosary may tempt thee with thy last love:
That is my vow, and thou shalt not refuse.



The Prince,

Where art thou that dost steal the honey of this happy maiden?

What hast thou here in thy heart, O Prince,
That is my sweet Prince? What hast thou here in thy heart,
That is my sweet Prince?



Good gracious Prince, what more can I say to thee in answer to thy poor excuse?

I am a lady; yet I should have gone with thee,
O, dear father, to your marriage.

I bid thee kiss my hand again.


My lady, O Prince, tell me what you think of that.



Why,
O Prince, do you speak to my love so rashly?




I have been so fond of you, that I did love to love thee.

For what reason did I not consent, when I saw my dear bride kiss my hand,
’’



’’

’’

’’















O, gentle Prince!

I have been so fond of you, that I did love to love thee.
For what reason did I not consent, when I saw my


===== CHECKPOINT 015 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

genome-based method that I think is best in this case.

You know, that’s where I get this.

So, let’s do it, and what do I need to do to get here?

I will show you what a ring, and my ladyhood, is made of.

I am the love of my life,
And all my life will be my business.

I am your only husband,
Your only son,
And you will be mine alone;
Not my lord, not your father,
No one but your loving father.

Now, I have a question you might wish to ask,
Forgive me; what is the matter?

I am your only husband,
Your only son,
And you will be mine alone;
Not my lord, not your father,
No one but your loving father.

Now, I have a question you might wish to ask,
Forgive me; what is the matter?

I am your only husband,
Your only son,
And you will be mine alone;
Not my lord, not your father,
No one but your loving father.

Now, I have a question you might wish to ask,
Forgive me; what is the matter?

I am your only husband,
Your only son,
And you will be mine alone;
Not my lord, not your father,
No one but your loving father.

Father, now! Take my hand; I am no longer a father
And you know I am, I am,
I am what you would like to be.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;

To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;

To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;
To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to let me marry;

To take your hand,
And I am no longer a father.

Henceforth I will beg you to


===== CHECKPOINT 015 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

37, a twenty-year-old man from the east, was killed and an unknown amount of other bodies are being carried by the direction and direction of the enemy.”

The date and location of the attack was not immediately known.

The Pentagon had no further comment.

See Also:

The Pentagon’s press release and the full account

Hackers attack Pentagon, charge Pentagon with murder

The Pentagon breaks down on Twitter


Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.


===== CHECKPOINT 015 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

classes-only club. The school was run by a lady who was a widow, who did not seem to have much in common with other sisters.

The youth in black and black-blue were both excellent at dancing. The young woman, the youngest, the youngest of all the girls, was her cousin. A young maid went with her and she had a well-behaved temper, and she was not too much drunk at the ball, for she had enough to drink in the presence of her cousin, who was well, and did not mind being there when she did not need it.

When she was done with her cousin, the other girl gave her a handkerchief, and she immediately took it, and said to the young maid, What do you think that is going on? Did you not tell me that she has been so long in dancing?

The old lady did not take the handkerchief and went to sit down; but she made him look pale, as she had no use for it. Then she went out, and she gave him another handkerchief, and he took it in her own hand, and took the other handkerchief, and she gave him a merry-go-round with it.


CHAPTER IV.


That is the point when, I have said, in the course of my life I have begun to forget some old acquaintance. It is not long after that that I shall again forget him, for I have been more foolish in my conduct, and more impatient to find out the true conduct of these two spirits.


It seems to me, then, that I should have been so much more foolish in my conduct, and more impatient to find out the true conduct of these two spirits.

That is the point when, I have said, in the course of my life I have begun to forget some old acquaintance. It is not long after that that I shall again forget him, for I have been more foolish in my conduct, and more impatient to find out the true conduct of these two spirits.

It is a fair-natured old proverb.

In those times I knew the lady of the house who lived with me, and she told me, If I had been more wise, I should have gone with him. If I had not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.


CHAPTER V.


The night before I began to forget, some twenty years have passed. I am now gone, and yet in the face of all this I am still in love.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and she says she would be wise if I had gone with her.

If I were not, I should have gone with her; but she is wise, and


===== CHECKPOINT 015 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Router.

I shall now answer your question of where were you when I left these streets and I will be with you when I come back. What did I do?

How can I say more than that you came with me,
When I was a gentleman, or if I am such,
If you are that gentleman? What was my conduct,
What was my business?

My conduct was, my husband. Why did I come hither? Why did I return hither?

Why have you gone hither? I have a gentleman.

My business?

EO.


EO.


EO.

What then? What then? What then? What then?

What then?

What then?


What then?

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===== CHECKPOINT 016 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

.


O, that may be true, and for that my brother, what are you?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!

EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!

EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!


EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!


EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!


EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!


EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!


EO.


I have told thee it may, and I confess it is, so true


ROMEO.


For I am no longer his friend,


ROMEO.


And yet I am your friend,


ROMEO.


I do believe in thy friendship.


ROMEO.


How may I be, when I hear thy love say such


JULIET.


Ay, do believe!


ROMEO.


JULIET.


What sayest thou?


ROMEO.


Doth thy soul live?


ROMEO.


No, no!


===== CHECKPOINT 016 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

unweary of any other, that should bring him hither.

I was not at all displeased; I knew not how I was to consent. And therefore they were to go, and so we did.
But there came a voice, and I saw it not that they spoke;’’ but that she spoke some words. Then they said:








Come, take me with you, my dear cousin; and I will take thee hence.
The kinswoman there, who is in charge, will help you.
Take her back, and follow her to the door.
O, and where shall I?

Why dost thou go to that door?
O,’ I fear it is there.

Hath I not the doors in my closet?

Henceforth I shall be gone to my closet.

Stay, gentlemen; and I’ll speak to you all that day.
If that is not done, you shall be gone to your lodging.
Come, come, help me, for I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.

What shall I do with thee in thy room?





I am sorry, cousin; I am not in my chamber much more.
Therefore, let me, you morrower, take thy mother with you.

Come, come, come, come help me,
To my closet; I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.
What shall I do with thee in thy closet?






I am sorry, cousin; I am not in my chamber much more.
Therefore, let me, you morrower, take thy mother with you.

Come, come, come help me,
To my closet; I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.
What shall I do with thee in thy closet?







O, if this be not true, I am mad.




No more excuse, cousin, if thou hast not at my door.
But come, come, help me,
To my closet; I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.
What shall I do with thee in thy closet?






Hath I not the doors in my closet?
Henceforth I shall be gone to my closet.
Stay, gentlemen; and I’ll be with thee presently.

What shall I do with thee in thy closet?






O, if this be not true, I am mad.



No more excuse, cousin, if thou hast not at my door.
But come, come, help me,
To my closet; I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.

What shall I do with thee in thy closet?






O, if this be not true, I am mad.



No more excuse, cousin, if thou hast not at my door.
But come, come, help me,
To my closet; I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.

What shall I do with thee in thy closet?






My dear cousin,’’s presence is in your bosom,
Being at thy side. O, do not think it wrong to take my hand.

But come, come, help me.

How hast I not come in thine hand yet? How wilt I prove it?







O, if this be not true, I am mad.



No more excuse, cousin, if thou hast not at my door.
But come, come, help me,
To my closet; I am gone,’
And I’ll be with thee presently.
What shall I do with thee in thy closet?






My dear cousin,’s presence is in your bosom,
Being at thy side. O, do not think it wrong to take my hand.
But come, come, help me.
How hast I not come in thine hand yet? How wilt I prove it?




===== CHECKPOINT 016 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Throughout on the ground, in the course of the night, I was obliged to run away, and take some rest before I made it out. I should not be so sure, that if I did run, they would not tell me where I was and how I was to be found, if I had not run.

The sun was out for twenty-four hours; and there was nothing but the darkness. At three o’clock, at nine o’clock, I found myself in the company of two men, both with long black hair, and sitting upon their backs.

What was they thinking? Did I ask them what was going on? Did they think I should lose my life?

The answer was no, no, I was not going to die.

The two gentlemen gave me a kiss and laid me on their backs; and as the night went on I was not yet at liberty to say what I had done.

I took the opportunity, and tried to answer with my head above the heads of the other gentlemen.

Somehow I was so happy.

Then I went out into the evening, to be alone and to be satisfied, and yet not satisfied.

That night I found myself quite alone, and all of a sudden I felt the light of day, and immediately found myself looking forward to a long day of bliss, and a strange and strange day.

A sudden fear in my mind, which was too sudden and too horrible to be known.

It felt as though I was on the back of a tree,
like a ball that had been laid down, and had come to rest upon a little mountain.

My limbs were as soft and smooth, as when I were grown.

My limbs were like hands to an iron,
As smooth and smooth as snow.

I saw no enemy, yet yet I could not tell if there was any.

’Tis the way I should die!

’I must die, or live.

This thought was so far-seeing and far-seeing, that I did not dare to think of anything else.

Therefore, being gone, I saw not one but two men, both dressed in black.


In a minute I was alone; and all these men were men of no consequence;
But when they saw me, and spoke with a fearful voice,’
’I was sorry.


I beseech thee, O love, do not die,’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’




I shall be satisfied at the door,
And no other.

It was a dream.




The night is like a long knife:
It pierces my joints and dulls my bone;
And when it is over,
My joints are gone.



In my hand a knife blows,
I cut the flesh out of a dead man’s arm;
And the dagger that blows
By daybreak blows through the veins of his bones.



O, this is my love!

My name’s name!

O my heart!

This knife is my dagger,
I swear by it.



I do not love this.

O, O, no!’
O, my heart is a knife,
And you are an enemy.

I shall die,’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’





I am sorry, madam, but I have the heart of a murderer.



Come again to confession, madam,


Lucretius.


The following is an exchange of letters which took place in the palace of Saint Peter, the emperor’s cousin.

JULIET.


Dost thou not fear me?

ROMEO.


Madam, thou hast spoken so much of it.

ROMEO.


Well, excuse me, madam; thou have made my peace.

JULIET.


Madam, what is the matter?

ROMEO.


What, she knows what to make of thy excuse,
Or that thou hast not told her what to make of thy word?

ROMEO.


Thou art not to be confounded; my lord, what thou have’st tell’st is not my tongue.

ROMEO.


Then tell me, madam, I


===== CHECKPOINT 016 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

prayed in my head. That was my first dream. I was a child again, and I knew the power that came with it. Then came the dream.

ROMEO.
Now, when I think of thee, what do I think I shall be?

ROMEO.
If thou art me,
Think of me; thou wilt find a man.

ROMEO.
My cousin, a fool!

ROMEO.
What a fool I am!

ROMEO.
What a fool I am!

ROMEO.
What a fool I am!

ROMEO.
Now, I come again, father, for my thanks.

ROMEO.
The heavens are full of rich light!

ROMEO.
What? This lamp?

ULIET.
What? This lamp?

ROMEO.
What? This lamp?

ROMEO.
’Lift this lamp!
Let me light thee a fire!

ROMEO.
O blessed father!
O blessed maiden!
And behold, my lamp is now light!
A lamp I will never light.
And I will light thee with the light of my soul.
Come now, father, look at me.

ROMEO.
I have not seen thee yet, O blessed father!
For shame is upon my face!
What doth this black-browed gentleman possess in me?

ROMEO.
And with his broad back is a bloody knife.
Give me your holy book, and I will bring thee to my father.
If thou hast no book, what book do I send thee?
Come, come, father, come, come!
What doth this black-browed gentleman possess in thee?

ROMEO.
And with his broad back is a bloody knife.
Give me your holy book, and I will bring thee to my father.
If thou hast no book, what book do I send thee?

Come, come, come, come!

ROMEO.

What doth he bring’st thee?

ROMEO.
A bloody knife.
’O blessed father!

O blessed maiden!
And behold, my lamp is now light!
A lamp I will never light.
And I will light thee with the light of my soul.
Come now, father, look at me.

ROMEO.
I have not seen thee yet, O blessed father!
For shame is upon my face!
What doth this black-browed gentleman possess in thee?

ROMEO.
And with his broad back is a bloody knife.
Give me your holy book, and I will bring thee to my father.

If thou hast no book, what book do I send thee?

Come, come, come, come!

ROMEO.
What doth he bring’st thee?

ROMEO.
A bloody knife.
’O blessed father!
O blessed maiden!
And behold, my lamp is now light!
A lamp I will never light.
And I will light thee with the light of my soul.
Come now, father, look at me.

ROMEO.
I have not seen thee yet, O blessed father!
For shame is upon my face!
What doth he bring’st thee?

ROMEO.
A bloody knife.
’O blessed father!
O blessed maiden!
And behold, my lamp is now light!
A lamp I will never light.
And I will light thee with the light of my soul.
Come now, father, look at me.

ROMEO.
I have not seen thee yet, O blessed father!
For shame is upon my face!
What doth he bring’st thee?

ROMEO.
A bloody knife.
’O blessed father!
O blessed maiden!
And behold, my lamp is now light!
A lamp I will never light.
And I will light thee with the light of my soul.
Come now, father, look at me.

ROMEO.
My dear father, have mercy upon thee.
Henceforth I have no more power in the world.
I have the mercy of thy word to speak.

ROMEO.
Your pardon.

ULIET.
I have not seen thee yet, O blessed father!
For shame is upon my face!
What doth he bring’st thee?

ROMEO.
A bloody knife.
’O blessed father!
O blessed maiden!
And behold, my lamp is now light!
A lamp I will never light.
And I will light thee with the light of my soul.


===== CHECKPOINT 016 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

brought some light from the ground where I stood.

‘And where were they then? Did they know me?’

Some of the old ladies asked him, with a frowning face.

And did I see the face of a fair maiden? And had she not I been in her presence, I should not think that her modesty bore such a mark as theirs?

So, gentle sir, did I forget their last resort. Let us pass on.

I have, and do not wish to lose, but to be met with at once by their eyes.


ROMEO.
There are no eyes, therefore, that are not holy.

Therefore tell me your wife?

ROMEO.
Give me not a tear, dear wife, but a tear of love, and I shall be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Hush, gentle sir, and you do not know me.


ROMEO.
There are no eyes, therefore, that are not holy.
Therefore tell me your wife?

ROMEO.
Give me not a tear, dear wife, but a tear of love, and I shall be satisfied.

ROMEO.
Hush, gentle sir, and you do not know me.


ROMEO.
Well, what shall we learn of the marriage?

ROMEO.
Well, they are married, not that I know them.
Now, I am much displeased at the manner in which they are married.
So I do not think that they are the true lovers.


ROMEO.
Jove hath sworn an oath that the truth be thy cousin; but now my love hath sworn an oath which the truth be not my cousin;
And therefore no man be found guilty of this,
That I should be Romeo, but my cousin
Is Romeo himself. O, where am I?


ROMEO.
Alack!
Thy eyes, thou eyes, thou eyes!


ROMEO.
Hush, gentle sir, and you do not know me.

Well, what shall we learn of the marriage?

ROMEO.
Well, they are married, not that I know them.
Now, I am much displeased at the manner in which they are married.
So I do not think that they are the true lovers.

So I do not think that they are the true lovers.

So I do not think that they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

I do not know you,
Jove.
What shall I learn of the marriage?

ROMEO.
Well, they are married, not that I know them.
Now, I am much displeased at the manner in which they are married.
So I do not think that they are the true lovers.
So I do not think they are the true lovers.
So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

Jove.
What shall I learn of the marriage?

ROMEO.
Well, they are married, not that I know them.

Now, I am much displeased at the manner in which they are married.
So I do not think that they are the true lovers.
So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

So I do not think they are the true lovers.

Jove.
What shall I learn of the marriage?

ROMEO.
Well, they are married, not that I know them.

Now, I am much displeased at the manner in which they are married.
So I do not think that they are the true lovers


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

imeter

4

4

3

1/2″

I will need another pair.

How to make your own?

Take some paper towel.

Take a pair of scissors.

Cut a circle from the bottom of the palm of your hand and point the paper in the direction of my hand. Then measure from this point to the bottom of your palm.

If you are making a knife, mark the following point on the paper:

This is where my knife is.

Put your thumb up at this point.

Turn the paper over in my hand.

See if you have any streaks left on your hand.

If not, move your hand toward the center of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.

Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.

Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.

Hold up the knife again and move the knife.
See if there is any streaks left on your hand.

If not, move your hand toward the centre of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.
Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.
Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.

Hold up the knife again and move the knife.
See if there is any streaks left on your hand.

If not, move your hand toward the centre of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.
Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.
Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.

Hold up the knife again and move the knife.
See if there is any streaks left on your hand.

If not, move your hand toward the centre of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.
Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.
Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.

Hold up the knife again and move the knife.
See if there is any streaks left on your hand.

If not, move your hand toward the centre of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.
Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.
Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.

Hold up the knife again and move the knife.
See if there is any streaks left on your hand.

If not, move your hand toward the centre of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.
Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.
Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.

Hold up the knife again and move the knife.
See if there is any streaks left on your hand.
If not, move your hand toward the centre of the mark and add a new one.

Take the new knife and cut it back towards my face.
Shave it in a little powder, and when you are satisfied, take a small drop and mix it with a little dry, dry powder.

See how it looks.

Now, what do you do?

Take some of the dry powder and make a knife.
Hold the knife there and press it to the mark.


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Yahoo is not a company that we use, we’re not affiliated with, we do not sell, or do not sell any merchandise that we sell, and we will not sell you any merchandise that is not our own or our own merchandise.

In our business we have some subsidiaries.

AJ

JULIET.

Do you believe that the law should prevent your leaving that business, or do you believe that we have already satisfied the law?

JULIET.

I will tell you, and before I do so, I will make you answer me.

JULIET.
Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.
That which I know must be so.

JULIET.
And in consequence thereof, you may leave my business.

JULIET.
If I may say so.

JULIET.
I will be gone.

JULIET.
In that which I know will be so.

JULIET.
And in consequence thereof, you may leave my business.

JULIET.
If I may say so.

JULIET.
I will be gone.

JULIET.
In that which I know will be so.

JULIET.
And in consequence thereof, you may leave my business.

JULIET.
If I may say so.

JULIET.
I will be gone.

JULIET.

In those which I do not intend to leave.

JULIET.
Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.
Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.

That which I know will be so.

JULIET.
And in consequence thereof, you may leave my business.

JULIET.
If I may say so.

JULIET.
I will be gone.

JULIET.

In those which I do not intend to leave.

JULIET.
Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.

Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.

You may quit my business.

JULIET.

If I may say so.

JULIET.
I will be gone.

JULIET.
In those which I do not intend to leave.

JULIET.
Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.

Your honour will have it but in a word, in consequence of this letter.

JULIET.

Things passing, you say.

JULIET.
I will, with my heart full of love, be gone.

JULIET.
But I am leaving thee to think what I may do, and what I shall do, both within this palace and within thy own.

JULIET.
I will be satisfied; and I will, in no wise vex thee, be satisfied.

JULIET.
What a fearful thing must I think thy thoughts to do.

JULIET.
And as for thee, think well, good man, in my eyes.

JULIET.
Good night, my true heart; and as thou hast been the love of my father,
Come. Take counsel, and be satisfied, and take leave.

JULIET.
Good night, my true heart; and as thou hast been the love of my father,
Come. Take counsel, and be satisfied, and take leave.

JULIET.
I will leave thee to think what I may do, and what I shall do, both within this palace and within thy own.

JULIET.
I will be satisfied; and I will, in no wise vex thee, be satisfied.

JULIET.
What a fearful thing must I think thy thoughts to do.

JULIET.
And as for thee, think well, good man, in my eyes.

JULIET.
Good night, my true heart; and as thou hast been the love of my father,
Come. Take counsel, and be satisfied, and take leave.

JULIET.
I will leave thee to think what I may do


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

satirical, and even vile.


As is a well-educated woman, her eyes are not blind; she cannot make out a word she would not use.


She cannot speak but of those her own heart says she needs help of.


She can speak but of those that she loves, but in such a desperate desperate matter she speaks with such frankness that it is difficult to say what she speaks.


She cannot speak but of those that she loves, but in such a desperate matter she speaks with such frankness that it is difficult to say what she speaks.


She cannot speak but of those that she loves, but in such a desperate matter she speaks with such frankness that it is difficult to say what she speaks.


It is her power that keeps her company, and that of her kinsmen
That she keeps.



JULIET.

O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.

I am my lady, the mother of many a bridegroom,
And a holy Rosary-saviour to the Mercutio;
Who keeps all my business in the closet of
My closet, and I cannot say more than that

Being myself, my dear father, is my comfort.

EO.

My dear father, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.

I am my lady, the mother of many a bridegroom,
And a holy Rosary-saviour to the Mercutio;
Who keeps all my business in the closet of
My closet, and I cannot say more than that
Being myself, my dear father, is my comfort.


ROMEO.

O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.

I am my lady, the mother of many a bridegroom,
And a holy Rosary-saviour to the Mercutio;
Who keeps all my business in the closet of
My closet, and I cannot say more than that
Being myself, my dear father, is my comfort.


ROMEO.

O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.


O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.


O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.


JULIET.

JULIET.

O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.


O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.


JULIET.

O, the fair Prince of Paris, thou art my lord and dearest friend,
That thou mayest be such a lady as I am.


ROMEO.


JULIET.

JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


J


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

.),

It is true that the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,
I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.


ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,
I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.
Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,
I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I have burnt him alive, and will not be satisfied.

Therefore, if thou hast slain him, thou shalt have thy own.

For I beseech thee to redeem him.

ROMEO.
If the father of this saint, having procured a son, gave him to be baptised.

I beseech thee, O thou, to give him up before I die.

For since he came to be buried,

I


===== CHECKPOINT 017 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

inventive.
I felt a twinge of fear, a strange, almost alien feeling, that the face of the boy whom I had just been entreated to speak to,
Was the face of an ass, a murderer, a child of a sick mother. I thought it very strange, and immediately I got up from the earth,
And, not wanting to see him, I went back to my closet, where I discovered a letter from my friend,
It was written and sealed to my dear father.

My heart is heavy in terror, and that my heart should be so heavy that I should feel it in my breast,
For fear I should think that if I did, I should have no heart at all.

It was my dear father who gave me this letter; it had been written to me and is my last memory;
And it had been sealed with such an exquisite seal that I cannot help feeling a twinge of terror,
That at the very moment when I have made the desperate need of his death,
I should feel a twinge of terror at the sudden and suddenness of that death.

It had been three days since I had seen my father, and, at three o’clock in the morning,
A dreadful dream had begun in my mind. I dreamt of a man, a maiden, and three fairies,
A dog, a mouse, a cow,
A lamb, and all the rest of them. I am not yet sure of all of them, but my father,
To his face!
Was it him, or me, or the ghost that lurks within me?

Henceforward I was terror-stricken with fear, and this fearful dream
Had come to me from an angel, and in my fear at the sudden appearance
of that heavenly presence
I tried to determine where it came from. The place in my dream
Is the Prince of Heaven, or rather is it,
That angelical Prince whom I have sworn to have slain.

What is it that I must tell thee?’


’I am sworn to go with thee to Heaven, and have thee make a journey.


How can I go with thee if I am not bound in any of my kinsmen’ heads?


I beseech thee, my lord, that thou mayst not be made prisoner,
For I know that, if thou go, thou will not be satisfied with nothing.


If thou shouldst believe me, thou art rich, but if thou shouldst believe me, thou cannot help but be hungry.


Thou art the Prince of the earth, and the earth I have bound thee to.

Give me the man from whom I have cut thy head off,
And I will give thee a cure for that murder that I am not bound in;
For this is my faith in thee, and thy faithfulness to me.

O, what good is this, but fear and sadness, and nothing else?




I have gone to tell thee the truth; I shall henceforward,
I fear that thou mayst not be satisfied.




But do not be vexatious, my lord; thou wilt find the cure;
And if thou canst, I swear it to thee in that I love thee.





I shall henceforward take thee to Heaven and have thee make a journey,
And have thee make a journey as well as thou canst.

Come, my dear father!
Come, where art thou?’

My father? Here, here is thy ring,
Thy ring that thou mayst need for thy cure.

I am a Prince of Heaven. Go with me, and give me this ring.


I have this ring in my hand, and this ring with it in my heart,
So thou mayst not starve.

But, be merciful, thou art my cousin, for thou art bound by my word.




Now, my dear father!
What hath that I have?







What is that I have?











What is that I have, that thou mayst not die?






Then be gentle, thou dost not love me, but thou hate the earth.





How can I love thee, but thou hate the earth?



===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Tonight. What?


O, what, I am gone?


JULIET.
Whose name is it, Nurse?


ROMEO.
Amen.


JULIET.
Amen.

ROMEO.
I cannot remember.


JULIET.
How much longer will I be gone, that night?


ROMEO.
What?

ULIET.
Too much, dear lord.


JULIET.
What?
My mind.


JULIET.
That thing I was, a ghost, a child.

ULIET.
What is it?

ULIET.
A ghost.

ULIET.
Ah, lord, this thou hast lost thy eyesight, dear ghost.

ULIET.
I will not, poor knight, stand here again.

ULIET.
I have got many shadows upon my face,

’tis not mine to hide them.

ULIET.
It is true, my eyes are a ghostly receptacle.

ULIET.
This is true, indeed.

ULIET.
It is true.

JULIET.
I have come so near, and to hear you speak I am very sorry.

ULIET.
My true love is boundless beauty.

ULIET.
I have not known you, but I love you.

ULIET.
O that which is dear to me will help to soften thy love,

’tis thy sweet love, dear lord.

ULIET.
’Tis true that I am here tonight.

ULIET.
I do not know thee.

ULIET.
I have no word, no spirit, no matter how near,

’tis a ghostly receptacle.

ULIET.
This is true, indeed.

JULIET.
I have come so near, and to hear you speak I am very sorry.

ULIET.
My true love is boundless beauty.

JULIET.
I have not known you, but I love you.

O that which is dear to me will help to soften thy love,’tis thy sweet love, dear lord.

’Tis true that I am here tonight.

ROMEO.
Amen.

ROMEO.
I cannot remember.

ROMEO.
O, what, I am gone?

JULIET.
How much longer will I be gone, that night?

JULIET.
What?
My mind.

ROMEO.
What is it?
My mind.

JULIET.
Ah, lord, this thou hast lost thy eyesight, dear ghost.

’tis not mine to hide them.

ULIET.
I have got many shadows upon my face,’tis not mine to hide them.

’tis not mine to hide them.

JULIET.
I have got many shadows upon my face,’tis not mine to hide them.

JULIET.
I have got many shadows upon my face,’tis not mine to hide them.

JULIET.
That is what they say.

ULIET.
They say,
That is what thou sayst.

ULIET.
But if thou askest a mortal, that which is mortal,

’tis not mortal.

ULIET.
I shall kill them all,
But, if thou hast slain them all,

’tis a thousand times more senseless death.

ULIET.
I have heard their shrieks and the shrieks of lamentation,

’tis the death which, if thou art dead,

’tis more senseless death.
Thou art my murderer,
And I am his friend, and both are one.

ULIET.
But if thou askest a mortal, that which is mortal,

’tis not mortal.
Thou art my murderer,
And I am his friend, and both are one.

JULIET.
It seems to thee to do me no good, to die so.

ULIET.
I will, poor knight, stand here again.

ROMEO.
My true love is boundless beauty.

JULIET.
I have not known you, but I love you.

O that which is dear to me will help to soften thy love,
’tis thy sweet love, dear lord.

’Tis true that I am here tonight.

ROMEO.
Amen.


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

tif, you were a maid; and my brother and sister have been murdered in the town of Capri; and the churchyard is full of burnt-up spirits; and my niece is dead; and I am in despair that my brother may be buried before he dies.”
My heart was in tears.
As I spoke this I heard the trumpet of Tybalt say,
What did I hear that I should not hear?
But I was not in such a fury,
That I should forget my part.
A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.

Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn that Tybalt Tybalt was the murderer.

And that his spirit is fair; and I am sure
His ghost hath slain all my kinsmen.
The walls have been torn down, and Tybalt is dead,
For there lies the Tybalt who cut my way.

ULA.
Madam,
Told thee in an hour of terror,
That the Tybalt was with me;
And I, therefore, must make haste
To bury my father; and for shame did I break my bargain
With Tybalt. But that would not help;
Therefore with a little prayer I beseech thee,
Let Tybalt bury me.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,
That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.
Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.
I have sworn that Tybalt Tybalt was the murderer.
And that his spirit is fair; and I am sure
His ghost hath slain all my kinsmen.
The walls have been torn down, and Tybalt is dead,
For there lies the Tybalt who cut my way.

ROMEO.
But you did not fear it, nor would I.
Tybalt, you say, had slain so many a man.
Your father is dead, and Tybalt was not with him;
And therefore, I must make haste.
And for shame did I break my bargain
With Tybalt. But that would not help;
Therefore with a little prayer I beseech thee,
Let Tybalt bury me.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,
That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.

Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,
That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.
Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,

That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.
Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,

That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.
Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,

That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.
Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,

That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.

Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,

That I should forget my part.

A fearful ghost spoke aloud;
But I did not fear it, nor would I.
That was not my father, but my cousin.
Tybalt was gone, and the town was burnt.

I have sworn, though my heart was in such a fury,

That I


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“)

This is the place where Jekyll, the lady that comes to steal my heart, dies and I go to her to die

Where her heart goes, where she is, where she says to the world,

I have left her, and she says to me,
Come with me to the vault where the maiden
Lies dead and lies still in the vault where I was
And, having slain her husband, she comes to say to him,
Come, come, come, let me marry you, and when you have been married

Do not be gone, for she lives and dies, and if thou canst return

She will marry thee and bid thee stay at home. I will come,
And when thou dost return, marry thee, for I am jealous
And thou hast married my niece with more dishonour
Than I did thy wife with my daughter. Take, my lord, take, thyself.


Romans 12:18-25 ESV / 12 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

But thou doest give me some excuse, not from that thou art so wise,
But because I love thee.

Alms for the poor, for I give this month to those who are needy
And those who are needy for what I have.

What an honour! Take care that you do not sin, for I commend thee to the heavens
For that thou wilt enjoy that honour


Romans 12:18-25:1-3 ESV / 9 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

Jekyll, the lady that comes to steal my heart, dies and I go to her to die

Where her heart goes, where she is, where she says to the world,
I have left her, and she says to me,
Come with me to the vault where the maiden
Lies dead and lies still in the vault where I was
And, having slain her husband, she comes to say to him,
Come, come, let me marry you, and when you have been married
Do not be gone, for she lives and dies, and if thou canst return
She will marry thee and bid thee stay at home. I will come,
And when thou dost return, marry thee, for I am jealous
And thou hast married my niece with more dishonour
Than I did thy wife with my daughter. Take, my lord, take, thyself.

Romans 12:18-25:1-3:


1 Peter 2:11 ESV / 8 helpful votes Helpful Not Helpful

He says,
God speaks in tongues, not in words.

As for love, love speaks by itself,
So in a tongue you speak,
If love were more like an idol,
If it were more like a serpent,
If it were more like a footstool,
I would have love in one. But the more I think of that
The more I hate it, the less love I have.

Therefore no one spoke to him of love
But some one spoke to him of tongues,
Which are but childish and deceitful.

This speaks to the lips, says some one.
But love speaks by itself,
So in a tongue you speak,
If love were more like an idol,
If it were more like a serpent,
If it were more like a footstool,
I would have love in one. But the more I think of that
The more I hate it, the less love I have.
Therefore no one spoke to him of love
But some one spoke to him of tongues,
Which are but childish and deceitful.

This speaks to the lips, says some one.
But love speaks by itself,
So in a tongue you speak,
If love were more like an idol,
If it were more like a serpent,

If it were more like a footstool,
I would have love in one. But the more I think of that
The more I hate it, the less love I have.

Therefore no one spoke to him of love
But some one spoke to him of tongues,
Which are but childish and deceitful.

This speaks to the lips, says some one.
But love speaks by itself,
So in a tongue you speak,
If love were more like an idol,
If it were more like a serpent,

If it were more like a footstool,
I would have love in one. But the more I think of that
The more I hate it, the less love I have.

Therefore no one spoke to him of love
But some one spoke to him of tongues,
Which are but childish and deceitful.

This speaks to the lips, says some one.
But love speaks by itself,
So in a tongue you


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

CSA, and are both the best in that department.

Tottenham have a new manager. They have a new general manager. I am sure they will have an adventure.

What do you think? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

-Stacey

Tottenham Hotspur v Liverpool, 4 p.m. PT


===== CHECKPOINT 018 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

attacker and the monster, as if all the world were to be slain, would disperse into the earth; and the earth would disperse like a fire, and the living dead would die. And when the two were out of the earth, they were in a rage, and were roaring.

Some other thing would have come to shake all that was at hand; and the monster would have slain them all; and the world would have been like a curtain upon the heavens.

Thou wilt find a man that knows how to kill, and he that hath the strength to do it knows how to kill.

Almighty God, that hath the strength of a serpent, and hath the strength of a dove.

Mercutio’s father, Mercutio, made many more changes than those above.
But at last he hath begotten my pardon.

But Mercutio’s commission is too high; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too low,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is too high.

O, Mercutio’s commission, what a commission it is!
Mercutio’s commission is too low; yet it is not my wish,
Therefore Mercutio’s commission is


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

etti is a new name, too young. He lives and breathes the air of his youth, and sings good music.


Farewell, friend, to him, amen.


JULIET.


Dost thou help me?
I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.


Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.


Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.


O, Romeo! Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.


Dost thou help me?
I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.


Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.
O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.


Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.
Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.
O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.
O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.
O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?
I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?

I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.

JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?
I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?
I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo!
Farewell, friend, to him, amen.

JULIET.

Dost thou help me?
I am not in bed yet.


JULIET.

Ay, she is not so; yet I am sure she is.


JULIET.

O, Romeo! Romeo


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Dispensitiv to іsiort!

O, it behoves me that he should not sin so,
That I should think it so.

’Tis no matter;’tis not the point.


ROMEO.


Hilary, I have seen you blush so much.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

irts, she was dead. But in the spirit of modesty that had me, there was beauty in her face. So I married her, and she bore me to her.

JULIET.
I saw the pale beauty of thy breast. Ah, she is so pale, O sweet face, and yet so tender.

ROMEO.
Tis so sweet, yet so sweet, and yet so dear. Ah, I love her too much, I do know it shall fall into love again.

ROMEO.
And she said: Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, sweet Capulet, what if she was thyself,
And sold for a crown like thy?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, sweet Capulet, what if she was thyself,
And sold for a crown like thy?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, sweet Capulet, what if she was thyself,
And sold for a crown like thy?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
O my father, I love thee more than she. I must love thee again,
And I shall take thee back.

JULIET.
I saw the pale beauty of thy breast. Ah, she is so pale, O sweet face, and yet so tender.

ROMEO.
Tis so sweet, yet so sweet, and yet so dear. Ah, I love her too much, I do know it shall fall into love again.

ROMEO.
And she said: Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, sweet Capulet, what if she was thyself,
And sold for a crown like thy?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
O my father, I love thee more than she. I must love thee again,
And I shall take thee back.

JULIET.
I saw the pale beauty of thy breast. Ah, she is so pale, O sweet face, and yet so tender.

ROMEO.
Tis so sweet, yet so sweet, and yet so dear. Ah, I love her too much, I do know it shall fall into love again.

ROMEO.
And she said: Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, sweet Capulet, what if she was thyself,
And sold for a crown like thy?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet than she?

ROMEO.
Ay, Romeo, tell me, what is the purpose of thy love,
To prove me more sweet


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

lawmakers have tried to hide this. But even before that, there was a letter that the press had already tried to send out and to which my father, who is on the other side of the world, did not read it.

I was in my cell, thinking, as I did every day, how little light or how much dim light I should be thankful to see that light, for my part I have been so thankful that my eyes are too bright, and I cannot afford not to be thankful; and how sweet the love, the comfort, is, when my own eyes are too bright.

When the news came in, I sprang into the dark cell, and did not wake till I had read it; but I came to the news in triumph.

It was a letter that my father gave me at Paris on the afternoon of the following day.

My father is dead.

JULIET.
Why have you been so well content?

ROMEO.
It is true. The letters tell that it was but an hour before I got word of his death. But what?

ROMEO.
Forgive me, my love.

JULIET.
If you have not, thou wilt do my father no harm.
I know him, my love, that I should be in fear.

ROMEO.
I have a sudden dream; but I am not well.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay, all the world speaks the death-letter,
That, as yet, speaks nothing of death.
I must, therefore, make my way.

ULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay, all the world speaks the death-letter,
That, as yet, speaks nothing of death. I must, therefore, make my way.

ROMEO.
Ay, ay, ay, ay, all the world speaks the death-letter,
That, as yet, speaks nothing of death. I must, therefore, make my way.

ROMEO.
O thou madman, and I will find thee to be dead
By thy behest; and I must do it by myself.
I will murder him, and all these will die by me
In triumph.

ULIET.
Ay, ay, ay, ay, all the world speaks the death-letter,
That, as yet, speaks nothing of death. I must, therefore, make my way.

ROMEO.
Ay, ay, ay, ay, all the world speaks the death-letter,
That, as yet, speaks nothing of death. I must, therefore, make my way.

ROMEO.
Good God! What are you, then, in need of help?

ULIET.
O thou madman, and I will find thee to be dead
By thy behest; and I must do it by myself.
I will murder him, and all these will die by me
In triumph.

ROMEO.
O thou madman! What are you, then, in need of help?

ROMEO.
I have the heart of a beggar.

ULIET.
And yet thou art not content.

ROMEO.
I have the heart of a beggar.

JULIET.
Where are the letters, you ask?

ULIET.
I have the heart of a beggar.

JULIET.
Where are the letters, you ask?

ROMEO.
JULIET.
They are in your hands.

ROMEO.
They seem not to be so, and in a sudden death I will not look upon them.
I shall die, I pray thee, and live a life to my reputation.

JULIET.
But what, pray’st thou, that thou wilt not be so?
I am not here to make thee merry, my lord, but thou wilt know how my letter is.
O that thou art not so?
I am not here to make thee merry, my lord, but thou wilt know how my letter is.

JULIET.
But what, pray’st thou, that thou wilt not be so?
I am not here to make thee merry, my lord, but thou wilt know how my letter is.

JULIET.
But what, pray’st thou, that thou wilt not be so?

I am not here to make thee merry, my lord, but thou wilt know how my letter is.

JULIET.
But what, pray’st thou, that thou wilt not be so?

I am not here to make thee merry, my lord, but thou w


===== CHECKPOINT 019 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

requisite or not, the enemy will not be found. And when this news comes, I am sure that it will be good news, and the enemy will not be found.
But how much more, when news of that kind be made known, that it be from all the world?


ROMEO.
The enemy cannot be found.

ROMEO.
This word in every tongue is the word of God, the angel of God;


JULIET.
And we know it not? But I will say so.
And we know it not? But I will say so.

JULIET.
It is but true, and I do believe it;
The world is but a sheet,
That keeps the book of this world bound,
And keeps the world from passing away,
That cannot be taken from there.
The book of that book must remain there,
It is but a book, and I swear it never will be.
And if I may, I shall have the book,
But shall not have it in the vault.
But if I may, I shall have the vault in my hand.
So, if you must have that book, bid me be your husband,
And let me sell it to the Prince that is at hand,
If this shall be my husband, I beseech thee,
By my word, bid me be his; and be satisfied, and I will have thee,

EO.
It is but true, and I do believe it;
The world is but a sheet,
That keeps the book of this world bound,
And keeps the world from passing away,
That cannot be taken from there.The book of that book must remain there,
It is but a book, and I swear it never will be.
And if I may, I shall have the book,
But shall not have it in the vault.
But if I may, I shall have the vault in my hand.
So, if you must have that book, bid me be your husband,
And let me sell it to the Prince that is at hand,
If this shall be my husband, I beseech thee,
By my word, bid me be his; and be satisfied, and I will have thee,

JULIET.
If thou wouldst me to sell thee the book,
And have it in my hand, bid I speak with thee.
I have no need of a husband, or a father, nor a mistress.
’But if thou wouldst me to sell thee the book,
And have it in my hand, bid I speak with thee.
I have no need of a husband, or a father, nor a mistress.

ROMEO.
I will not do it, yet I am bound;
For my heart is bound;
My bosom is bound;
I be made a bridegroom’d by the count;
And when I die, Romeo, when I speak, I am bound,
Being a boundman, Romeo, having no fear of death.

EO.
If thou wouldst me to sell thee the book,
And have it in my hand, bid I speak with thee.
I have no need of a husband, or a father, nor a mistress.

ROMEO.
I will not do it, yet I am bound;
For my heart is bound;
My bosom is bound;
I be made a bridegroom’d by the count;
And when I die, Romeo, when I speak, I am bound,
Being a boundman, Romeo, having no fear of death.

JULIET.
I will not do it, yet I am bound;
For my heart is bound;

My bosom is bound;
I be made a bridegroom’d by the count;
And when I die, Romeo, when I speak, I am bound,
Being a boundman, Romeo, having no fear of death.

JULIET.
My dear father, where didst thou hear me?
What doth thou mean with that, Prince? What doth thou mean with that, Prince?

ROMEO.
I have come to meet thee.
I love thee. I love thee well.
But how shall I help thee, cousin?
Give me a ring, dear father, and I’ll show thee how I might
Live to my wedding.

ULIET.
My dear father, where didst thou hear me?
What doth thou mean with that, Prince? What doth thou mean with that, Prince?

ROMEO.
I have come to meet thee.
I love thee. I love thee well.
But how shall I help thee, cousin?
Give


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Name in his youth, that all men should be like this.

ROMEO.
But wherefore, O Friar?

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ULAI.
O Friar!
ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.

What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if I have a ghostly spirit, and he brings me to you again?

ROMEO.
Or let him go in?

ROMEO.
O Friar!

ROMEO.
What if


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Miguel.

Farewell

’Gentlemen,

Dost thou yet hate me?

Dost thou, that thou love me so much that thou hatest my soul?

O madam, what if, at the stroke of fate,
It befallen thy love’s ghost and kill’d thy face?

How’s that for a man to have slain his own ghost,
Dost thou so love me, or will I slay thee with a thousand blows?

Farewell, fellow-vengeful sinners, and bid me purify thee.

I beseech you
To do as I have said.

Madam, when’s it said thee that?

If it be true, I will not believe it.
But in spite of all this,
I do swear to you that I am the Prince of Mercutio.
Go, and stay at home, or I’ll go out of my way.

Madam, wherefore hast thou gone?

Did I come to tell thee that I did not come to steal thy heart?
Or was it so, to give thee some excuse that thou mayst think it so?

Or have I’s been so fair a father to Romeo,
That I must at once confess that I did steal’d him of his temper?
Why, that in the course of thy heart’s course
I gave thee a new manhood.


ROMEO.
O madam, when’s it said thee that?
If it be true, I will not believe it.
But in spite of all this,
I do swear to you that I am the Prince of Mercutio.
Go, and stay at home, or I’ll go out of my way.

Madam, wherefore hast thou gone?

Did I come to tell thee that I did not come to steal thy heart?
Or was it so, to give thee some excuse that thou mayst think it so?
Or have I’s been so fair a father to Romeo,
That I must at once confess that I did steal’d him of his temper?
Why, that in the course of thy heart’s course
I gave thee a new manhood.

ROMEO.
O madam, when shall I meet you at this hour?

JULIET.
Ay, sweet Juliet! Where is my father?

EO.
Madam, when’s it said thee that?
If it be true, I will not believe it.
But in spite of all this,
I do swear to you that I am the Prince of Mercutio.
Go, and stay at home, or I’ll go out of my way.

Madam, wherefore hast thou gone?

Did I come to tell thee that I did not come to steal thy heart?
Or was it so, to give thee some excuse that thou mayst think it so?
Or have I’s been so fair a father to Romeo,
That I must at once confess that I did steal’d him of his temper?
Why, that in the course of thy heart’s course
I gave thee a new manhood.

ROMEO.
O madam, when shall I meet you at this hour?

JULIET.
Ay, sweet Juliet! Where is my father?

JULIET.
What say’st thou?

EO.
I did not hear it.

ULIET.
How long’s it been?

I should have.

ULIET.
Thou madam, when shall I meet you at this hour?

JULIET.
What say’st thou?
’Why, then, did I hear you that Romeo spoke a falsehood,
Because it’s contrary to what thou wert all know,
And so displeas’d me to hear that I did hear it,
And so tell’st me that thy tale was a lie,
That I should know.
Why, then, did I hear that Romeo spoke a falsehood,
Because it’s contrary to what thou wert all know,
And so displeas’d me to hear that I did hear it,
And so tell’st me that thy tale was a lie,
That I should know.

Why, then, did I hear that Romeo spoke a falsehood,
Because it’s contrary to what thou wert all know,
And so displeas’d me to hear that I did hear it,
And so tell’st me


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

determine I am a child of God?

If so, then be no help. I ask you, father, if you shall,
Depart.

JULIET.
My heart grows heavy, and not long shall I remain,
For my father and I have not yet met;
Therefore we shall be married, and our marriage shall last forty days,
Being at Mantua, and shall attend the festival.

ROMEO.
For some strange reason I fear to come hence, and I should fear to return.

JULIET.
And yet, joy, joy; you are well, and yet I am vexed.

ROMEO.
I will think well of it; and here is the matter. I have many fears, and yet
I am fairly well attuned to the temper of others;
Therefore, if this may be, I repent.

ROMEO.
Ay, gentle Mercutio, be gone.

ROMEO.
No, no, be gone.

JULIET.
Ay, gentle Mercutio, be gone.

ROMEO.
No, no, be gone.

ROMEO.
I pray thee, Mercutio, if thou wilt,
By any means devise an excuse,
To prevent me from hereafter going,
Being at Mantua, I will stay at home,
And come hence with you, to attend the festival.

ROMEO.
Wherefore, father, how shall I now?

ROMEO.
Ah, good heavens, you will learn more hereafter.

JULIET.
If I be told, thou wilt find me well.

ROMEO.
Ay, that wilt be true; but, what can I say?

JULIET.
Thou art not well, father;
I am too much, and I am much more,
I am than I am.

ROMEO.
What news shall I hear? I fear no.

JULIET.
O, you cannot speak ill of me.

EO.
For some strange reason I fear to come hence, and I should fear to return.

JULIET.
And yet, joy, joy; you are well, and yet I am vexed.

ROMEO.
I will think well of it; and here is the matter. I have many fears, and yet
I am fairly well attuned to the temper of others;
Therefore, if this may be, I repent.

ROMEO.
Ay, gentle Mercutio, be gone.

ROMEO.
No, no, be gone.

ROMEO.
I pray thee, Mercutio, if thou wilt,
By any means devise an excuse,
To prevent me from hereafter going,
Being at Mantua, I will stay at home,
And come hence with you, to attend the festival.

ROMEO.
Wherefore, father, how shall I now?

ROMEO.
Ah, good heavens, you will learn more hereafter.

JULIET.
If I be told, thou wilt find me well.

ROMEO.
Ay, that wilt be true; but, what can I say?

JULIET.
Thou art not well, father;
I am too much, and I am much more,
I am than I am.

ROMEO.
What news shall I hear? I fear no.

JULIET.
O, you cannot speak ill of me.

JULIET.
O, you cannot speak ill of me.

JULIET.
O, you have a pair of bad eyes.

ULIET.
O, you have a pair of bad eyes.

ULIET.
O, thou have no eye for eyes;
A pair of bad eyes, if you would have them.

JULIET.
Good father, let me see what thou hast there.

ULIET.
O, thou have no eye for eyes;
A pair of bad eyes, if you would have them.

JULIET.
Good father, let me see what thou hast there.

ROMEO.
O, thou have no eye for eyes;
A pair of bad eyes, if you would have them.

JULIET.
Good father, let me see what thou hast there.

ROMEO.
Hath thou not a pair of bad eyes,’
A pair of bad eyes, if thou would have them?

JULIET.
Ah, good father, let me not forget thee.

ROMEO.


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

marketed. They gave us the name and the reputation we are looking for.


Gentlemen,


Your conduct is inexcusable and I am sorry that I should do this.


Your love,

JULIET

Did you find him at all strange when you came
To this place?


ROMEO

What was his purpose?

EO
I wonder if his name
Was ever a letter to himself.

EO
What doth he think of it? He doth not think of it at all.

JULIET
I shall return to tell thee what.

ROMEO
What now?

EO
O dear Juliet, thou hast come hither to ask me pardon.

JULIET
What now?

ROMEO
What now?

EO
Ay, but I can never be sure of my conduct till I know how.

ROMEO
And this?

EO
Ay, but I can never be sure of my conduct till I know how.

JULIET
I will return to tell thee what.

ROMEO
What now?

JULIET
Art thou gone yet?

EO
O dear Juliet, thou hast come hither to ask me pardon.

JULIET
What now?

JULIET
Art thou gone yet?

JULIET
If I may speak, I will if you can; and I have made you this love-song,
To sing it again and again in thy behalf,
Wherefore art thou?

EO
Ay, but I can never be sure of my conduct till I know how.

JULIET
Is love an excuse for wanting to be sold?
No, love is a joy; and love itself is no excuse.

EO
Ay, but I can never be sure of my conduct till I know how.

JULIET
And this?

JULIET
Art thou gone yet?

JULIET
If I may speak, I will if you can; and I have made you this love-song,
To sing it again and again in thy behalf,
Wherefore art thou?
The sun, the clouds, the stars, and the earth are all here,
And all are warm and prosperous,
Because they have sold their souls to those who are sold.
It is that night I found thee; and I found thee in bed,
And thou bedraggled in my lap.

EO
Ay, but I can never be sure of my conduct till I know how.

JULIET
Art thou gone yet?

JULIET
If I may speak, I will if you can; and I have made you this love-song,
To sing it again and again in thy behalf,
Wherefore art thou?
The sun, the clouds, the stars, and the earth are all here,
And all are warm and prosperous,
Because they have sold their souls to those who are sold.
It is that night I found thee; and I found thee in bed,
And thou bedraggled in my lap.

ROMEO
What news?

ROMEO
A little while, and Romeo speaks;
I hear no more news.

EO
Ay, but I can never be sure of my conduct till I know how.

JULIET
Art thou gone yet?

JULIET
If I may speak, I will if you can; and I have made you this love-song,
To sing it again and again in thy behalf,
Wherefore am thou?
The sun, the clouds, the stars, and the earth are all here,
And all are warm and prosperous,
Because they have sold their souls to those who are sold.
It is that night I found thee; and I found thee in bed,
And thou bedraggled in my lap.

ROMEO
What news?

ROMEO
A little while, and Romeo speaks;
I hear no more news.

ROMEO
Ay, but I have lost count of all the letters I have.

EO
Ay, but I have lost count of all the letters I have.

JULIET
Well, sweet Nurse, be gone.

EO
Ay, but I have lost count of all the letters I have.

JULIET
Ay, but I have lost count of all the letters I have.

JULIET
Your love, what is the matter?

EO
How do I know it?

JULIET
My true love, you say?

EO
Well, sweet Nurse, be gone.

EO

JULIET
What is the matter?


===== CHECKPOINT 020 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

architecture

If you want to be as good as possible and do well in your first year, go to school.

But the best thing is, if you have to pay for it, to attend.

If you are desperate, be discreet.

If you have to leave the school immediately, go to the Prince; but he is not there.

The Prince will be with you in the day, and come and sit with you, and you shall be alone in a minute.

In this state the Prince will be in charge and all the rest shall be company.

Therefore in this state the Prince will be gone.

Therefore farewell, fellow.

Nay, and do not despair.


ROMEO.
There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet a kiss,
A sweet sweet tongue, gentle and gentle enough
To sweeten lips, lips that are too short to take
A kiss from your lips. There is no love,
Not yet a kiss, yet


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

fielding

Some of the more advanced weapons may be seen by the light.

JULIET.
What is it?

JULIET.
A desperate request? I defy thee,
Not tonight,
Because I am too bold for night.
Night shall tell how long thou canst stand back,
So thou wilt have to bid farewell.
This night, thou art desperate, and canst not be found
Out of breath.
O, stay not, stay, Stay, Stay, Stay, Stay, Stay!

ROMEO.
Hold this till tomorrow,
I pray thee leave me, that thou mayst help me.

ROMEO.
Arise, thou canst not.

JULIET.
I am not here to sell thee,
Nor bid thee buy my death.
This is my mother, and my father,
And yet thou canst not buy either.

ROMEO.
O, what doth this matter, that is so sudden?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art too strong.

ROMEO.
A thousand times more so, then.

JULIET.
I have been fearful for thee,
For I am bound to thee tonight
And tonight tomorrow morning’s vexation will have
Till I die. O lord, I will.
Come, come, come come, come, come, come, come,
Come, come come!

ROMEO.
O, what doth this matter, that is so sudden?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art too strong.

ROMEO.
A thousand times more so, then.

JULIET.
I have been fearful for thee,
For I am bound to thee tonight
And tonight tomorrow morning’s vexation will have
Till I die. O lord, I will.
Come, come, come, come, come, come, come, come, come, come!

ROMEO.
O, what doth this matter, that is so sudden?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art too strong.

ROMEO.
A thousand times more so, then.

JULIET.
I have been fearful for thee,
For I am bound to thee tonight
And tonight tomorrow morning’s vexation will have
Till I die. O lord, I will.
Come, come, come, come, come, come, come, come, come!

ROMEO.
What doth this matter, that is so sudden?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art too strong.

ROMEO.
A thousand times more so, then.

JULIET.
I have been fearful for thee,
For I am bound to thee tonight
And tonight tomorrow morning’s vexation will have
Till I die. O lord, I will.
Come, come, come, come, come, come, come, come!

ROMEO.
O, what doth this matter, that is so sudden?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art too strong.

ROMEO.
A thousand times more so, then.

JULIET.
My lord, thou art too strong.

ROMEO.
A thousand times more so, then.

JULIET.
What did I say to thee before?

JULIET.
I have a strange fear.

ROMEO.
A sort of fear, too, or what I mean.

JULIET.
Ay, a sort of fear, that I have.

ROMEO.
Ay, the fear of which, not a touch the part,
Is like a sudden fainting,
That may have strange, yet cheerful spirits.

JULIET.
Ay, I hate fear. It is a poison that in a little while
Makes the faintest sound,
And when it dies it is like a ghost.

JULIET.
Ay, fear, I have many fears,
That in a little while live like tigers.

ROMEO.
Ay, I have many fears,
That in a little while live like birds.

ROMEO.
Ay, fear! Ay, fear! O fear!

ULIET.
A sort of fear, too, or what I mean.

ROMEO.
Ay, a sort of fear, that I have.

ROMEO.
Ay, the fear of which, not a touch the part,
Is like a sudden fainting,
That may have strange, yet cheerful


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Karl a nobleman and I were all slain. But he was not without part of his blood. I met him and made love to him. Then he cut the twain out of the hand of life, and gave it to me.

ROMEO.
O, what hath done that?

ROMEO.
I am sorry that thou art in this state.

ROMEO.
I would never have married.

ROMEO.
Thou wilt never marry again.

ROMEO.
Live, or die.

ROMEO.
Do not despair.

ROMEO.
O God, I shall live to see thee fall asleep.
But there thou art, dead, hanging in the bottom of the night.

ROMEO.
Hath thou nothing left to die for but this?

ROMEO.
Ay, madam.

ROMEO.
I saw thee die.

ROMEO.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me. What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me. What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.

How late must we weep?

ROMEO.
I am in love with the day, and love with the morrow.

ROMEO.
But wherefore, sweet Juliet, how doth thy womb tell the world?

ROMEO.
If it were not so, it is with a wink.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.
How late must we weep?

ROMEO.
I am in love with the day, and love with the morrow.

ROMEO.
But wherefore, sweet Juliet, how doth thy womb tell the world?

ROMEO.
If it were not so, it is with a wink.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.
What is death?

ROMEO.
A dreadful question, an exquisite one.

ROMEO.
My heart hath yet torn me from my husband.

ROMEO.
A murderer, gentle Mercutio,
What hath that to do with love?

ROMEO.
O tell me.
How late must we weep?

ROMEO.

I am in love with the day, and love with the morrow.

ROMEO.
But wherefore, sweet Juliet, how doth thy womb tell the world?

ROMEO.
If it were not so, it is with a wink.

What is death?


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Labyrinth. He was a gentle savage, not one of that kind of savage nature that would make a man ill. He had a pale face, which, when he saw that it was dark, bore a frowning mark of that sort. He was pale in complexion, but his pale, pale face bore his dark brow. He spoke of a black cat, whom he had known and knew all that was in his nature.

“What are they, then?”

“Ay, they are to-night; the nightingale is to-morrow. If they are here that are here, let me make haste, for I intend to take a present of their acquaintance,

Lest I disturb their business. These are some new shoes,
Some sort of locket made of fine jewel-piercing
dressing. They are to-morrow in black,
In a lace, a fine lace. I will presently take them,
And if I shall fail, I swear they shall prove
Of much use in a short time. But I trust in them, and am well satisfied.

Lest I be vex’d with my bargain, and leave them to be discovered,
It will be by you, that I shall determine tomorrow,
And if you excuse me, or I’ll prove
Too late, you will not have such proof of what I intend,
As you have now. They are indeed in black.

I think it best that I have them in hand. These, as they say, were bought in the night,
And all in good time.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way,
And tell me how to get them all.

ROMEO.
There is daylight to be found here;
Go, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come, torches; light the way.

ROMEO.
And so they are; but at what price?

ROMEO.
By those ropes. Then come,


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Mormonism

The light of life

Spread upon my lips

Unfolding lies upon my back

Some dark secret, or strange favour
Which I cannot determine
By any other name.

—Johannes Kepler, in Verbum

Johannes was an early Christian, and is credited with many other achievements.

Johannes is, in many ways, a saint; he was knighted by Pope Pius IX, and the deacons of Paris
are still in his church, where he attends the feasts of the faith.

When he was twelve, as a young man, he learnt how to take physic;
When he was ten, as a lad, he learnt to play the trumpet;
And yet, even as youth, he cannot learn to play the trumpet.

His father was so wise in physic that he, as the name indicates,
Was so wise and gentle in physic that he
Could not use the word physic when he was youthful;
For there is in the substance such a singular skill in physic
That when he took it, his tongue would immediately speak with a full-pierced tongue,
Which to his true native tongue would have been a dream.

Johannes was born in Tybalt, in the town of Saint-Mertens; he died there in a town
In honour of his father, and was buried in the name of his father,
Being a Capulet, and therefore without the help of divining light
He is immortal, having been born in Capulet,
And banished from that town by a god of the west;
For Capulet hath sinned against me, and against myself,
Having banished from that town, I descend to that town, and kill him.
This is murder, I beseech you.
I am a father to my own, and therefore banished.
What, then, will I do in consequence of this, if I live?

Johannes is banished; my name, and all that I hold dear,
Live with me, or be buried in his name, and die in his tomb.

I beseech you. Get back to me now, and do as you wish.

I beseech you again, and take the place of my banished cousin.

If you do, take him to thy house, and buy him a present,
And in his stead make a note upon my life,
And that I may return to my father, who was banished.

—Johannes Verbum

Johannes Verbum was born in Tybalt, in the town of Saint-Mertens; he died there in a town
In honour of his father, and was buried in the name of his father,
Being a Capulet, and therefore without the help of divining light
He is immortal, having been born in Capulet,
And banished from that town by a god of the west;
For Capulet hath sinned against me, and against myself,
Having banished from that town, I descend to that town, and kill him.
This is murder, I beseech you. Get back to me now, and do as you wish.

I beseech you again, and take the place of my banished cousin.

If you do, take him to thy house, and buy him a present,
And in his stead make a note upon my life,
And that I may return to my father, who was banished.

—Johannes Verbum

It is true. It is true. It is true. I am banished; my name, and all that I hold dear,
Live with me, or be buried in his name, and die in his tomb.
I beseech you. Get back to me now, and do as you wish.

I beseech you again, and take the place of my banished cousin.

If you do, take him to thy house, and buy him a present,
And in his stead make a note upon my life,
And that I may return to my father, who was banished.

—Johannes Verbum

My lady cousin.


Henceforward, then, what I do, is to resign myself to some tedious work.
But I beseech you, if you do not, I will tell you what I shall do; and, unless you do so, I shall,
As I have said, resign myself entirely to this.

Herein lies no need of much excuse. My lady cousin.


EO.
Now hath my dear mother, that hath kept me company,
I shall keep thee company,
And take thy letters, that I may send thee again.

EO.
Now hath my


===== CHECKPOINT 021 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Vanderbilt. The best that can be learnt from men and boys, though in such cases as these belong to the past; and hence we have a great many who have learnt this a great many times in this world.

JULIET.
Ay, Juliet!

JULIET.
What is it,
That is the Prince’s wife?

JULIET.
Ay, ay, that is too best; I will not stay, for Juliet, is dead. Poor lady, she’s dead,
’tis not but with me. O that is the Prince’s ghost,
Which she is dead.

JULIET.
Ay, she is dead.

JULIET.
Ay, she is dead.

JULIET.
Good heavens, what else can be better than death?

JULIET.
It is such a bad ghost, as to tempt the eye
Of mortals that he should sink into a state of infinite sleep.
It is, indeed, so, that I may remember it well.

JULIET.
But if it were such a ghost, that he should sink into a state of infinite sleep,
I will weep with him at the bottom of the well,
And pray him deliver me from this fiend’s jaws;
Which, I am told, are so fine and so inexhaustible,
That I can afford even one more hour than this,
To forget the end I had in mind. So, dear Juliet, excuse me.

JULIET.
What is the Prince’s ghost?

JULIET.
Ay, she is dead.

JULIET.
It is such a bad ghost, as to tempt the eye
Of mortals that he should sink into a state of infinite sleep.
It is, indeed, so, that I may remember it well.

JULIET.
But if it were such a ghost, that he should sink into a state of infinite sleep,
I will weep with him at the bottom of the well,
And pray him deliver me from this fiend’s jaws;
Which, I am told, are so fine and so inexhaustible,
That I can afford even one more hour than this,
To forget the end I had in mind. So, dear Juliet, excuse me.

JULIET.
Why, what if Juliet be slain,
And not thy ghost,
The Prince would have slain her. Poor ghost, she’s dead;
It would have slain her, too, had not she been slain.

JULIET.
How? That, indeed, is the Prince’s ghost’s death,
Thou wilt not tell. If it be so, let him kill her
That is no more than an arrowhead for her head,
As a sickening iron.

JULIET.
O, that is more than I shall believe.

JULIET.
I cannot be sure.

JULIET.
What, if Juliet be slain,
And not thy ghost,
The Prince would have slain her. Poor ghost, she’s dead;
It would have slain her, too, had not she been slain.

JULIET.
How? That, indeed, is the Prince’s ghost’s death,
Thou wilt not tell. If it be so, let him kill her
That is no more than an arrowhead for her head,
As a sickening iron.

JULIET.
O, that is more than I shall believe.

JULIET.
I cannot be sure.

JULIET.
What, if Juliet be slain,
And not thy ghost,
The Prince would have slain her. Poor ghost, she’s dead;
It would have slain her, too, had not she been slain.

JULIET.
O, that is more than I shall believe.

JULIET.
What, if Juliet be slain,
And not thy ghost,
The Prince would have slain her. Poor ghost, she’s dead;
It would have slain her, too, had not she been slain.

JULIET.
What, if Juliet be slain,
And not thy ghost,
The Prince would have slain her. Poor ghost, she’s dead;
It would have slain her, too, had not she been slain.

JULIET.
Wherefore, madam, shall I kill thee,
But take thy life with a rapier,
And cut thy breast with a sick


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

unsustainable it is, to say nothing of the other, that so small an issue should be subject to such imposts of such a severity. Let me confess my shame, gentlemen, I have in this matter a debt to you, which you are unworthy of having. For a minute I am sorry enough to have you in my letters. There are many men and I know them well enough, and some I know well enough, that it would be better to exile and not to marry them. They all seem to have it in their hearts to live on. What say you? Is it not worse than murder that you can no longer be free? Then I shall never marry, even if I have some business to do with you. I have many business to do with you; and you have sold me to men like myself who do sell me drugs. Let me be frank, gentlemen; what is worse than murder that you can no longer be free? Then I shall never marry, even if I have some business to do with you. I have many business to do with you; and you have sold me to men like myself who do sell me drugs. Then I shall never marry, even if I have some business to do with you.

JULIET.
O God, what an enemy you have to have! What a perversion of light you make of that one day I shall find myself on opposite sides of a mountain.

JULIET.
But you have not a palace above ground, and no walls to guide the savage, for that is what you call an unmade world,
As well you think it can be made out of tatters and rocks,
And you will never make it your palace again.

JULIET.
Your palace is too vast, and with all the help it gives, it is but little enough for a living mass of worms.
What are you thinking of that, my dear lady? Take a breath, you see I do not remember any of this
For my part I have been so ill-proud,
And yet you say I must love you. That I do love you.

JULIET.
But what do you think of that? Take a breath, you see I do not remember any of this
For my part I have been so ill-proud,
And yet you say I must love you. That I do love you.

JULIET.
I remember, you say.

ROMEO.
Did I steal thy name? Did I murder thee?

ROMEO.
Not without murder, but thou didst not kill me. Then tell me, what cause hast thou, my lord?

ROMEO.
I do not know. Then do thou speak again.

ROMEO.
But I will. Did I steal thy name? Did I murder thee?

ROMEO.
Not without murder, but thou didst not kill me. Then tell me, what cause hast thou, my lord?

ROMEO.
I do not know. Then do thou speak again.

ROMEO.
But I will.

ROMEO.
I did steal thy name? Did I murder thee?

ROMEO.
Not without murder, but thou didst not kill me. Then tell me, what cause hast thou, my lord?

ROMEO.
I do not know. Then do thou speak again.

ROMEO.
But I will.

ROMEO.
I do not know. Then do thou speak again.

ROMEO.
But I will.

ROMEO.
I do not know. Then do thou speak again.

ROMEO.
What if I may speak again? But for that I can never trust thy word

ROMEO.
That thou were my father. I have no strength or kinsman to trust me.

ROMEO.
I am sorry, methinks I have no power; but what if it be thy hand?

ROMEO.
Give me thy hand, hand, hand, hand. That hand shall redeem me.

ROMEO.
That hand, thou barest that which thou wast mine.

ROMEO.
Give me thy hand again, hand, hand.

ROMEO.
What if I may speak again? But for that I can never trust thy word

ROMEO.
That thou were my father. I have no strength or kinsman to trust me.

ROMEO.
I am sorry, methinks I have no power; but what if it be thy hand?

ROMEO.
Give me thy hand again, hand, hand.

ROMEO.
What if I may speak again?

ROMEO.
Give me thy hand again, hand, hand.

ROMEO.
What if


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

tenant to attend, it would seem, were the church there not to be baptised there. But when they found that the doors were open, they made them a ring of earth.

ROMEO.
I will not.

ULIET.
What then?

ULIET.
By heavens I am sorry;
For I have been hungry for many days.
In my youth I was a man of many limbs.
My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ULIET.
By heavens I am sorry;
For I have been hungry for many days.
In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.
By heavens I am sorry;
For I have been hungry for many days.
In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;
For I have been hungry for many days.
In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.
By heavens I am sorry;
For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.
By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how to keep itself.

ROMEO.
What then?

ULIET.

By heavens I am sorry;

For I have been hungry for many days.

In my youth I was a man of many limbs.My limbs are bare; my flesh is rotten;
But youth must learn how


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

cow as he rode on.

ROMEO.
Ay, what, when I was a lad,
And found thee dead in a pitch-dark dream
And told thee how dreadful a beast it was,
To know thee by name?

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?
What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I shall never die.

ROMEO.
O God! What else can I do but weep?

ROMEO.
I


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====



Come and enjoy the cup that I gave you, that thou mayst not sin against me,
Therefore give me another opportunity of rest.

JULIET

I beseech thee, dear father, I beseech thee,
That I may not provoke thee into sin.

ROMEO
But if thou wilt do it, I beseech thee,
I beseech thee, that I may not provoke thee into sin.

JULIET
I beseech thee, my heart
Is ever so full of prayer and love that thou mayst not sin against me
As if I were here again.

EO
But if thou wilt do it, I beseech thee,
I beseech thee, my heart
Is ever so full of prayer and love that thou mayst not sin against me
As if I were here again.

ROMEO
Is it not so? Is it not so? Is it not so?

JULIET
Ay, my lord.

EO
But if thou wilt do it, I beseech thee,
I beseech thee, my heart
Is ever so full of prayer and love that thou mayst not sin against me
As if I were here again.

ROMEO
Is it not so? Is it not so?

JULIET
Ay, my lord.

ROMEO
Ay, my lord.

JULIET
Didst thou hear me speak? Is my heart so heavy that thou mayst not sin against me?

ROMEO
Not so. I beseech thee, help me; for I cannot prevent thee from sinning.

JULIET
O my lord.

EO
Didst thou hear me speak? Is my heart so heavy that thou mayst not sin against me?

ROMEO
Not so. I beseech thee, help me; for I cannot prevent thee from sinning.

JULIET
O my lord.
ROMEO
Didst thou hear me speak? Is my heart so heavy that thou mayst not sin against me?

ROMEO
Not so. I beseech thee, help me; for I cannot prevent thee from sinning.

JULIET
O my lord.
ROMEO
I should have married thee, had I not.

EO
But if thou wilt do it, I beseech thee,
I beseech thee, my heart
Is ever so full of prayer and love that thou mayst not sin against me
As if I were here again.

ROMEO
Is it not so? Is it not so?

JULIET
Ay, my lord.

ROMEO
Didst thou hear me speak? Is my heart so heavy that thou mayst not sin against me?

ROMEO
Not so. I beseech thee, help me; for I cannot prevent thee from sinning.

JULIET
O my lord.
ROMEO
I should have married thee, had I not.

ROMEO
Well then, thou wilt do it, thou good hand,
With which thou art well attired, and I have yet to have a wound in thee.

EO
But if thou wilt do it, thou good hand,
With which thou art well attired, and I have yet to have a wound in thee.

ROMEO
I have had it and my wound hath not healed it.

EO
How long shall it take to cure thy sin? Then I beseech thee, excuse me.

ROMEO
What shall I do with thee?

EO
Well then, thou wilt do it, thou good hand,
With which thou art well attired, and I have yet to have a wound in thee.

ROMEO
I have had it and my wound hath not healed it.

ROMEO
Is that not so?

EO
Well then, thou wilt do it, thou good hand,
With which thou art well attired, and I have yet to have a wound in thee.

ROMEO
I have had it and my wound hath not healed it.

ROMEO
I beseech thee, excuse me.

ROMEO
What shall I do with thee?

JULIET
Come hither, take this handmaid.

EO
Come hither, take this handmaid.

ROMEO
Ah, my love! Ah, my love! I never knew thou there.

EO
I have had it and my wound hath not healed it.

ROMEO
I have had it and my wound hath not healed it.

ROMEO
Come hither, take this hand


===== CHECKPOINT 022 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

IDs

Typhoon: No

Typhoon: Merciful heavens!

Typhoon: Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens! Merciful heavens!


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Balance-Yield
This is my full-grain and almost-milk-free, high-fiber, plant-based, paleo-friendly paleo breakfast!
What’s in a name? A word like that will help you to think, but I need no help to tell you it is not my.
I mean, I know you know I am not pale, nor that I drink from any of the above.
My pale food is nourishing, yummy, and full of all these beauties that are all part of the plant, which the flesh is not made of.
But there comes a time when you cannot think of food without nourishment.
Let me tell you a tale.
Back in my youth, in the dark of my early youth, my mother took me into her black-hued room.
I was twelve years old and I was out of breath, so I did not know what to do.
I felt some sort of strange feeling in my bottom, and I thought my mother was asleep.
As I was thinking this, she laid me down on a pale, lightly matronly throne,
And she laid me upon this heavy throne, where I could not but waken.
My mother looked at me and she said,
‘What is that? My pale mother? Is she dead? O no, that is not so.
She is very pale, she is quite dead, and she is in a pale grave.
What now?’ I said, thinking she spoke ill of my pale face.
She said to me,
‘Tell her, tell her at once that she speaks ill of mine pale face.
O, she is not dead, she is quite dead.
Her name is dear to me, and she lives upon this throne above all other ladies.
She may even be my wife, but she is not hers.
Her lips do not touch mine, her eyes do not touch mine.
Her cheeks do not move mine, her cheeks do not move mine, and her cheek is pale and full of such beauties that my mind cannot think of anything else but them.
My lips and hers do not touch mine, her lips do not touch mine.’
I did not speak ill of my mother, she did not speak ill of mine mother,
Nor did she slander me with such a rude voice that my lips were black and pale.
She did, and so did she.

So I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit of childhood came again to live in me,
And she told me to stay up, for she had promised to have me go with her,
But I went to bed, and the spirit


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

inflammation with that, which I think it must be that my breath should be made more heavy thereon, which is not so. I should be much more comfortable, and not more woebegone, in that direction.


JULIET.
I have learnt some counsel from you.


JULIET.
What say’st thou, that I have learnt from him that hath learnt
Some strange remedy?


JULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.


JULIET.
Well, wherefore?


JULIET.
By some other name than my own.


JULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.


JULIET.
By some other name than my own.

JULIET.
Is he not here?


JULIET.
A trumpet? No, he’ll be with us.


JULIET.
I have learnt some counsel from you.

ROMEO.
Away to heaven’s help, my dear love,
I beseech thee to bring us news of a joyous state of health;
I have, therefore, but a little time before tomorrow’s state of rest,
to be with thee at leisure to perform the rite of marriage.

EO.
Art thou not well?

ULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.


JULIET.
By some other name than my own.

JULIET.
Is he not here?


JULIET.
A trumpet? No, he’ll be with us.

ROMEO.
Away to heaven’s help, my dear love,
I beseech thee to bring us news of a joyous state of health;
I have, therefore, but a little time before tomorrow’s state of rest,
to be with thee at leisure to perform the rite of marriage.

ROMEO.
Art thou not well?

ULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!


JULIET.
Is he not here?


JULIET.
Is he not here?

ROMEO.
Away to heaven’s help, my dear love,
I beseech thee to bring us news of a joyous state of health;
I have, therefore, but a little time before tomorrow’s state of rest,
to be with thee at leisure to perform the rite of marriage.

ROMEO.
Art thou not well?

ULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!

JULIET.
Thou knowest, but thou knowest not how I can help it,
Unless thou helpst me to speak it aloud.


JULIET.
O, wherefore?

EO.
O, wherefore?

JULIET.
I am so sorry to hear thee speak.

What if I may speak it aloud, or shall thou speak it aloud,
It is not me, my dear father, but Tybalt,
Who, having overheard thee talk, doth at once interrupt me,
And speak thus to me.

ULIET.
Whate’st thou there, Nurse?

ULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!


JULIET.
What say’st thou, that I have learnt from him that hath learnt
Some strange remedy?


JULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!

JULIET.
What say’st thou, that I have learnt from him that hath learnt
Some strange remedy?

JULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!

JULIET.
What say’st thou, that I have learnt from him that hath learnt
Some strange remedy?

JULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!

JULIET.
What say’st thou, that I have learnt from him that hath learnt
Some strange remedy?

JULIET.
Ay, ay;’tis no comfort at all.

ROMEO.
No, sir!


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

NEULIET.
How can the world be so rich? Look at what a needy mother I am!
I am not poor. I have but need and afford.
I have but necessaries, my life and my necessaries.
What is the matter, poor fellow? I have not a knife to cut it.
Hear me now, and leave me to think. What is the matter?

JULIET.
How can the world be so rich? Look at what a needy mother I am!
I am not poor. I have but need and afford.
I have but necessaries, my life and my necessaries.
What is the matter, poor fellow? I have not a knife to cut it.
Hear me now, and leave me to think. What is the matter?

JULIET.
How can the world be so rich? Look at what a needy mother I am!
I am not poor. I have but need and afford.
I have but necessaries, my life and my necessaries.
What is the matter, poor fellow? I have not a knife to cut it.

Hear me now, and leave me to think. What is the matter?

JULIET.
What can I do for this poor beggar? I will do it at once.

JULIET.
What can I do for this poor beggar? I will do it at once.

JULIET.
I have been hungry, I will do it at once.

JULIET.
I have been hungry, I will do it at once.

JULIET.
I have been hungry, I will do it at once.

JULIET.
I have been hungry, I will do it at once.

JULIET.
Good night, Tybalt, good night. Poor little Tybalt, bad boy!

JULIET.
Tybalt, good night. Poor little Tybalt, bad boy!

JULIET.
Where is the lodging? Poor Nurse, come to my lord and father tomorrow.
Father, be gone, Tybalt!
Where was my father the night before? I ask thee,
’Tis the palace, Tybalt.
Where hath my mother gone? What doth her name?’s name?
’Twixt three and twelve hundred and forty-two years old?
What woe is my mother in?
Where is her lodging, poor lady? Where hast she gone?
Where is my father, madam?
How came my father to come to beseech me at thine door?
What doth his nurse do in this woo?
’He hath not come to beg my help.
Father, have you seen him? He lies pale and is waggling his eyes.
How is he?’s death so sudden that he is gone.
I pray thee, where is my father? What says he to my mother?
Where is my father, madam?
’Tis the palace, Tybalt. Where hath my mother gone? What doth her name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s name?’s


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

swating her lips with a desperate kiss, the sight of the beast engrossing her hungry lips made her tremble with the heat. Then she turned back to look at him.

“Ay, Juliet, there is more to this than is shown here by those pale pout-boys, whose eyesight is much better than mine, and whose eyesight is worse. Take the poison. Take it immediately; and I’ll be satisfied.

JULIET.
Ay, Juliet, there is more to this than is shown here by those pale pout-boys, whose eyesight is much better than mine, and whose eyesight is worse. Take the poison. Take it immediately; and I’ll be satisfied.

JULIET.
O God! Ah, Juliet, there is more to this than is shown here by those pale pout-boys, whose eyesight is much better than mine, and whose eyesight is worse. Take the poison. Take it immediately; and I’ll be satisfied.

JULIET.
Ay, Juliet, there is more to this than is shown here by those pale pout-boys, whose eyesight is much better than mine, and whose eyesight is worse. Take the poison. Take it immediately; and I’ll be satisfied.

JULIET.
And I will. I will, if thou wilt.

JULIET.
I love you, Romeo; and you are but a little.
I am yet Romeo’s son.
Stay, my lord; take leave.

ULIET.
I love you, Romeo; and you are but a little.
I am yet Romeo’s son.
Stay, my lord; take leave.

JULIET.
But the bargain that thou hast made will not.
What if, now, when I’re in thy presence, I take with me that fatal poison
That thou wilt take with me from thy charnel-house,
And thou and my ghost, with thy trunk stifled? Then with a leap of lightning,
I’ll break the bargain, and Romeo’s body shall lie dead,
Upon the Tygant-tree topside. This is paradise, and here
I will stay; and all these days hereafter,
I will live by the tree that calls home to me.
Therefore, come, take me, thou poor man, and make my farewell vow.

JULIET.
Whate’er do’st thou mean by that? Come hither, take me with thee,
And perform these things which I have promised thee to do:

JULIET.
O father, I am sure you will do well, and will do as I say.

ROMEO.
Is there another way? Is there another way?

ROMEO.
And in a dream, O dream-goer, that in thy dreams can be satisfied
’’’s life?
JULIET.
Ah, Juliet, I am no longer thou.
Now, at some time in the night before I go to bed,
Let me take thee with me. Take this ring, and this finger,
And with these, I swear fealty to you.

ROMEO.
What shall I do? Get thee help, or fetch me some food?

ROMEO.
Go and find me some food.

ULIET.
But the bargain that thou hast made will not.
What if, now, when I’re in thy presence, I take with me that fatal poison
That thou wilt take with me from thy charnel-house,
And thou and my ghost, with thy trunk stifled? Then with a leap of lightning,
I’ll break the bargain, and Romeo’s body shall lie dead,
Upon the Tygant-tree topside. This is paradise, and here
I will stay; and all these days hereafter,
I will live by the tree that calls home to me.
Therefore, come, take me, thou poor man, and make my farewell vow.

JULIET.
Whate’er do’st thou mean by that? Come hither, take me with thee,
And perform these things which I have promised thee to do:

JULIET.
O father, I am sure you will do well, and will do as I say.

ROMEO.
Is there another way? Is there another way?

ROMEO.
And in a dream, O dream-goer, that in thy dreams can be satisfied
’’’s life?

JULIET.
Oh, thou


===== CHECKPOINT 023 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

eradicate. So we should not, but I will do it, in my soul, that I may live to see if that man or her kinsman, whose eyes have blind faith, are ever found, and slain in that state.

ROMEO.
O, what doth thy grace prove? Shall I in a minute send thee some word of apology?

ROMEO.
Not now.

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse!

EO.
O, what doth thy grace prove? Shall I in a minute send thee some word of apology?

ROMEO.
Not now.

ROMEO.
Ay, good Nurse!

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
What is this?

ROMEO.
I am thou not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thou not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.

ROMEO.
What in the world is this?

ROMEO.
I am thee not sure.


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Kapalapakkal, said he was in a rage; and when he got his axe, it struck him so hard that it hurt him so much that he forgot to hit it. The rage was so great that the hurt did not cease till nine in the morning, when, hearing him tell it to the noise, the whole assembly fell upon him.
Tybalt, hearing this, said,
The rage of the Tybaltians upon this man’s head hath been an inexorable one,
From the time that Tybalt was slain, till the time that he’s come to die,
To the time when he shall have slain him,
It is a bloody Tybalt; for, though the world laughs at him,
The world keeps quiet; and it is the more bitterly to call him dead,
Since the more dearly he hath been maimed.

The noise of that death
Is like roaring torches, till they disperse, and there is no noise,
Not even the warmest breath that man can utter
To call him dead.

EO.
O, why hast thou so high?

ULY.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

EO.
Ah, what if a herald come to herald my death?

ULY.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Come Nurse, come to my door.
’Thou mean’st to die,
But I am not satisfied till thou tell me where.

ULY.
O, why hast thou so high?

Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Come Nurse, come to my door.
’Thou mean’st to die,
But I am not satisfied till thou tell me where.

ULY.
My name is Benvolio.

ULY.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Come Nurse, come to my door.
’Thou mean’st to die,
But I am not satisfied till thou tell me where.

ULY.
My name is Benvolio.

ROMEO.
Thou hast laid siege to our walls, and siege’d us both.
Now, come hither Nurse!

ULY.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Come Nurse, come to my door.
’Thou mean’st to die,
But I am not satisfied till thou tell me where.

ULY.
My name is Benvolio.

ROMEO.
Thou hast laid siege to our walls, and siege’d us both.
Now, come hither Nurse!

ROMEO.
I have come to bring news of my marriage.
Come hither Nurse, come hither to stay at the wedding-house.
I will not move the wedding-row,
But the walls that are the walls of my marriage walls.

EO.
O, why hast thou so high?

Shall I at leisure herald the news?
UL.
Haplyst thou there,
Shall I at leisure herald the news?

UL.
Come Nurse, come to my door.
’Thou mean’st to die,
But I am not satisfied till thou tell me where.

ULY.
My name is Benvolio.

ROMEO.
Thou hast laid siege to our walls, and siege’d us both.
Now, come hither Nurse!

ROMEO.
I have come to bring news of my marriage.
Come hither Nurse, come hither to stay at the wedding-house.
I will not move the wedding-row,
But the walls that are the walls of my marriage walls.

ROMEO.
O blessed angel, thou hast slain so many sinners,
Thou dost reviv’d them all in one night.

EO.
What did I hear? O, what did I hear?
My husband’s name is Capulet.
I would not marry him without his name,
Unless he should be slain.
My husband’s name is Capulet.
I


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Boise.

Some years I saw some little boys in those dismal little groves,
And some men did bark,
Which are sad enough, to hear of death;
So sad is death when such joy prevails
In such a hollow and dismal cell.

Some are black-footed, some light-blue, some white,
And some are green, some pale-skinned, some black,
Where grey-browed folks live and die.
Some are merry-go-round, some are gone,
Some are mad and run away, some mad-wearied,
Some are gone and say, Why are we here?

What is my husband? He says he is gone, and what?

Hast thou not laid thy husband there in hell?

Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
That thou wilt not make him come hither?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
That thou wilt not make him come hither?

Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,

Then bid him come hither, and bid him come speak.

ROMEO.
But before thou can speak to him, he must first come to me.
My husband, that doth not live to see thee, must I be gone,
So thou wilt not stay with me here till thou wilt make him come hither.

JULIET.
O God, what have I in store for thee here?
My husband? O say’st thou not of thy husband’s death?
And yet, O God, is thy ghost but yet living?
Come, shut the door, and look on me.
O, are you not going to press this murder on my head?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
That thou wilt not make him come hither?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
Then bid him come hither, and bid him come speak.

JULIET.
O God, what have I in store for thee here?

My husband? O say’st thou not of thy husband’s death?
And yet, O God, is thy ghost but yet living?
Come, shut the door, and look on me.
O, are you not going to press this murder on my head?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
That thou wilt not make him come hither?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
Then bid him come hither, and bid him come speak.

JULIET.
O God, what have I in store for thee here?

My husband? O say’st thou not of thy husband’s death?
And yet, O God, is thy ghost but yet living?
Come, shut the door, and look on me.
O, are you not going to press this murder on my head?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
Then bid him come hither, and bid him come speak.

JULIET.
O God, what have I in store for thee here?

My husband? O say’st thou not of thy husband’s death?
And yet, O God, is thy ghost but yet living?
Come, shut the door, and look on me.
O, are you not going to press this murder on my head?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
Then bid him come hither, and bid him come speak.

JULIET.
O God, what have I in store for thee here?

My husband? O say’st thou not of thy husband’s death?
And yet, O God, is thy ghost but yet living?
Come, shut the door, and look on me.
O, are you not going to press this murder on my head?
Or, if thou hast but thyself here, wherefore say’st thou,
Then bid him come hither, and bid him come speak.

JULIET.
O Prince, what of this? Answer me, for I am sworn an enemy,
And thou hast sworn mine own life to swear it.
The Prince’s kinsman is gone, and there’s no man left.
What’s the Prince’s kinsman gone to do, therefore?
O, what’s the


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

dioxide on the plant?

Gentlemen, how doth the emperor
Come to be emperor before me?

For I am an emperor, and shall henceforth be
A Churchman of peace and courtesy.


ROMEO.


Good angel, take counsel of me.
The contrary wind blows bitterly upon the world,
Farewell, prosperous Friar.

ROMEO.


Away to the palace, where I’ll be met;
There’s counsel and comfort, blessed Friar.
I am here to answer your prayer.
What comfort? Why d’st thou here?
‘I am an emperor, and shall henceforth be
A Churchman of peace and courtesy.

EO.


Good angel, take counsel of me.
The contrary wind blows bitterly upon the world,
Farewell, prosperous Friar.

ROMEO.

Away to the palace, where I’ll be met;
There’s counsel and comfort, blessed Friar.
I am here to answer your prayer.
What comfort? Why d’st thou here?‘I am an emperor, and shall henceforth be
A Churchman of peace and courtesy.

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, for I have learnt your secret from my father,
And I am content to die your kinsman.
The Prince’s name is Montague, and all the holy rites
That he may swear are yours; but that he omit’d,
He’ll be slain or banished. It is but the name of a name
That should make you tremble at the sight of it;
Being the title of your Prince,
Your kinsman is my true Prince, and you are bound to attend
That honourable day in his stead
That shall mark my conduct throughout his life.

ROMEO.


Gallant!
O, you vile fickle beast!

EO.
Gallant!
O, you vile fickle beast!

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, for I have learnt your secret from my father,
And I am content to die your kinsman.

The Prince’s name is Montague, and all the holy rites
That he may swear are yours; but that he omit’d,
He’ll be slain or banished. It is but the name of a name
That should make you tremble at the sight of it;
Being the title of your Prince,
Your kinsman is my true Prince, and you are bound to attend
That honourable day in his stead
That shall mark my conduct throughout his life.

ROMEO.
Gallant!
O, you vile fickle beast!

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, for I have learnt your secret from my father,
And I am content to die your kinsman.

The Prince’s name is Montague, and all the holy rites
That he may swear are yours; but that he omit’d,
He’ll be slain or banished. It is but the name of a name
That should make you tremble at the sight of it;
Being the title of your Prince,
Your kinsman is my true Prince, and you are bound to attend
That honourable day in his stead
That shall mark my conduct throughout his life.

ROMEO.
Gallant!
O, you vile fickle beast!

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, for I have learnt your secret from my father,
And I am content to die your kinsman.

The Prince’s name is Montague, and all the holy rites
That he may swear are yours; but that he omit’d,
He’ll be slain or banished. It is but the name of a name
That should make you tremble at the sight of it;
Being the title of your Prince,
Your kinsman is my true Prince, and you are bound to attend
That honourable day in his stead
That shall mark my conduct throughout his life.

ROMEO.
Gallant!
O, you vile fickle beast!

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, for I have learnt your secret from my father,
And I am content to die your kinsman.

The Prince’s name is Montague, and all the holy rites
That he may swear are yours; but that he omit’d,
He’ll be slain or banished. It is but the name of a name
That should make you tremble at the sight of it;
Being the title of your Prince,
Your kinsman is my true Prince, and you are bound to attend
That honourable


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

participile’d by his fellows; he gave them drink and food. Then came we hither, and having bid farewell our father and mother, and our daughters and ducats, we went out into the night.

JULIET.
O day, early in the morning,
My lord, what hast thou to do at night?
What hast thou to do at night?
Thou madam, I am much vex’d;
I am at night’s door; thou mayst not speak to me.

ROMEO.
Why dost thou weep so bitterly?
’Thou canst not tell how I shall die.
I am desperate and shall never be found.
I will not die.

JULIET.
O day, early in the morning,
My lord, what hast thou to do at night?
What hast thou to do at night?
Thou madam, I am much vex’d;
I am at night’s door; thou mayst not speak to me.

ROMEO.
Why dost thou weep so bitterly?
’Thou canst not tell how I shall die.
I am desperate and shall never be found.

JULIET.
O day, early in the morning,
My lord, what hast thou to do at night?
What hast thou to do at night?
Thou madam, I am much vex’d;
I am at night’s door; thou mayst not speak to me.

ROMEO.
Why dost thou weep so bitterly?
’Thou canst not tell how I shall die.
I am desperate and shall never be found.

JULIET.
What in the world shall I do now, when thou hast laid these eyes on mine

’head? O, what worse shall I
experience death
than to behold my lord dead, with a dead man’s face?
What worse shall I to be beguil’d by thy forefathers?

ROMEO.
Thou detestable tyrant, thy father, thy mother, thy sick;
Thy name is Phaeton, thou art my father;
Thy honourable Tybalt, thou hast slain
Tybalt’s men, and thy lady, thy husband;
Thy daughter is the Capulet of Myre’s death;
Thy name’s blood shall stain every grave,
And with it shall follow a jealous sea.

ROMEO.
Thou villain, therefore, bid thy youth go down
To fetch thyself a poison,
For thou art a drunkard. O, what a waste
Thou mangled arm is to my lord!
A dagger, for hire, I daresay;
Whate’er thy tongue doth outrage thy bid.
Thy life is precious to thee, that art envious;
Thy hand is for hire, I’ll send thee poison.
O, bid me be thy guide.
Thy back is smooth, smooth motionless.

EO.
Thou detestable tyrant, thy father, thy mother, thy sick;
Thy name is Phaeton, thou art my father;
Thy honourable Tybalt, thou hast slain
Tybalt’s men, and thy lady, thy husband;
Thy daughter is the Capulet of Myre’s death;
Thy name’s blood shall stain every grave,
And with it shall follow a jealous sea.

ROMEO.
Thou villain, therefore, bid thy youth go down
To fetch thyself a poison,
For thou art a drunkard. O, what a waste
Thou mangled arm is to my lord!
A dagger, for hire, I daresay;
Whate’er thy tongue doth outrage thy bid.
Thy life is precious to thee, that art envious;
Thy hand is for hire, I’ll send thee poison.
O, bid me be thy guide.
Thy back is smooth, smooth motionless.

JULIET.
O day, early in the morning,
My lord, what hast thou to do at night?
What hast thou to do at night?
Thou madam, I am much vex’d;
I am at night’s door; thou mayst not speak to me.

ROMEO.
Why dost thou weep so bitterly?
’Thou canst not tell how I shall die.
I am desperate and shall never be found.

JULIET.
What in the world shall I


===== CHECKPOINT 024 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

robber.
This, in no wise helps in the matter; for when thou wilt resort to me, O lord, I will show thee my lenity.

ROMEO.
But if thou wilt sin, but do not repent,
I will tear thy name from my face,
And strew it upon a torch, and bring fire to this fiery cell,
And poison to this poor man.
The fire, therefore, shall be as white as snow,
And burn the youth in hell with blackness.
And death shall be for this damned man,
And for that which he murdered.

ROMEO.
But if thou wilt sin, but do not repent,
I will tear thy name from thy face,
And strew it upon a torch, and bring fire to this fiery cell,
And poison to this poor man.
The fire, therefore, shall be as white as snow,
And burn the youth in hell with blackness.
And death shall be for this damned man,
And for that which he murdered.

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I do believe it hath been my sin to do so,
Because of an unworthy name. What, cousin, will I do that to thee?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I do believe it hath been my sin to do so,
Because of an unworthy name. What, cousin, will I do that to thee?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
My shame is vast, and I am unworthy,
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of mercy.
Come, help me now, help me presently.
What sin dare I attempt? Tell me not, friend;
What sin, if any, should provoke this encounter?

ROMEO.
I beseech thee, methinks I have no sin;
I am an honest man, gentle maiden;
For love hath no bounds, bounds, bounds of


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Ol

Call No.

Jut.

I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.

My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.

My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for my hair.

The Capulet’d Nurse is my best knight.
My love, my lord,
My only love, is as dear to me now
As when I was Romeo’s paramour.
My sweet Rosaline, my true love!
I have such a sweet Rosaline,
Who loves to have the kisses of closeness.
Hold! I must kiss again.

Jut.
I should have had another chalice for


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

detorited the spirit of a jealous love.

When my temper was too rough,
By torture to live a cheerful man;
Being slain, and mangled,
I spake Tybalt to heaven.
But Phoebus, when I saw Tybalt,
Said to me, Why dost Phoebus kill me?
Tybalt spake to me, I am an uncle;
Tybalt, thou hast slain my father. Tybalt spake to me, I am an enemy. Tybalt spake to me, I am an assailing dragon. Tybalt spake to me, I am an idol. Tybalt spake to me, I am an envious father. Tybalt spake to me, I am an outrage.
Thus Phoebus, when Phoebus is slain,
Shall slay me with the swiftest arrow. Tybalt spake to me, I am an outrage.
This man hath murdered my father;
I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt’s life, Tybalt slain.
O, my lord, thou art no match for my youth,
For Tybalt’s name is everlasting fire,
Which on this day might wash the blood of youth
From lovers’ hands, and lead them back to everlasting fire.
O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!
Tybalt slain, thou wilt not allow me to die,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.
O, be not jealous, O, for Tybalt’s name’s stain
Is on my cheek as heavy upon a mountain’s cross;
And yet, love, love’d, be not satisfied. O, who art my cousin?

Tybalt spake to me, I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt’s life, Tybalt slain.
O, my lord, thou art no match for my youth,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.
O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!

Tybalt slain, thou wilt not allow me to die,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.

O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!

Tybalt spake unto me, I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt’s life, Tybalt slain.
O, my lord, thou art not match for my youth,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.
O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!

Tybalt spake to me, I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt’s life, Tybalt slain.
O, my lord, thou art not match for my youth,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.
O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!

Tybalt spake unto me, I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt’s life, Tybalt slain.
O, my lord, thou art not match for my youth,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.

O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!

Tybalt spake unto me, I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt’s life, Tybalt slain.
O, my lord, thou art not match for my youth,
For Tybalt’s name’s stain upon my name’s grave is everlasting fire.
O, I am an enemy!—Tybalt slain!

Tybalt spake unto me, I am an enemy; Phoebus’s death shall not be short.
This word’d swear’d Tybalt�


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

collection of books. But I fear that there are too many books, or too many strange books, or too many false or untimely books, which tempt me to despair, lest I should tell the truth.

I am sorry, madam; I shall at some time tell you what hath happened to me.

I beseech you, go, come and kill me. I beseech thee, go. O say not a word, lest I offend you,
For I am hungry and you two will be more hungry than me.

Then, at my word, take my life,
And send me not another word; for this day is nigh; and therefore shall I’ll speak;
For no one can help me than thou; therefore thou must be my guide.

Then shall I at your word; for I am not bound by thy words.



Hast thou learnt me what thou chidd’st me of my lodging?


ROMEO.
By heaven I am rich.
The rich teach me to rejoice.

If I learn to do wrong, what should I do?

EO.
By heaven I am rich.
The rich teach me to rejoice.
If I learn to do wrong, what should I do?

ROMEO.
By heaven I am rich.
The rich teach me to rejoice.
If I learn to do wrong, what should I do?

ROMEO.
No, madam; we shall not speak of that matter till I shall have it all out.
How can a gentleman of rank give up a thing when none hath it?

ROMEO.
Thou art the lord of my fortune. O good lord, I am rich indeed.

But what of the world?
What if that fortune belong to some other than myself?

ROMEO.
If so, then thou hast sold me the world for gold.

EO.
By heaven I am rich.
The rich teach me to rejoice.
If I learn to do wrong, what should I do?

ROMEO.
No, madam; we shall not speak of that matter till I shall have it all out.
How can a gentleman of rank give up a thing when none hath it?

ROMEO.
Thou art the lord of my fortune. O good lord, I am rich indeed.
But what of the world?
What if that fortune belong to some other than myself?

ROMEO.
If so, then thou hast sold me the world for gold.

ROMEO.
Nay, good Mercutio, but that which thou hast sold me shall fetch thee the treasure.

ROMEO.
Is not a thing like this for a gentleman?

EO.
No, madam; we shall not speak of that matter till I shall have it all out.
How can a gentleman of rank give up a thing when none hath it?

ROMEO.
Thou art the lord of my fortune. O good lord, I am rich indeed.
But what of the world?
What if that fortune belong to some other than myself?

ROMEO.
If so, then thou hast sold me the world for gold.

ROMEO.
Nay, good Mercutio, but that which thou hast sold me shall fetch thee the treasure.

ROMEO.
Is not a thing like this for a gentleman?

JULIET.
The world speaks.

EO.
No, madam; we shall not speak of that matter till I shall have it all out.
How can a gentleman of rank give up a thing when none hath it?

ROMEO.
Thou art the lord of my fortune. O good lord, I am rich indeed.
But what of the world?
What if that fortune belong to some other than myself?

ROMEO.
If so, then thou hast sold me the world for gold.

ROMEO.

Nay, good Mercutio, but that which thou hast sold me shall fetch thee the treasure.

ROMEO.
Is not a thing like this for a gentleman?

JULIET.
The world speaks.

JULIET.
If she be hers own, let hers sell,
And her husband sell, if that be hers, sell and give them to her husband.

JULIET.
O father, do not kill her.

EO.
No, madam; we shall not speak of that matter till I shall have it all out.
How can a gentleman of rank give up a thing when none hath it?

ROMEO.
Thou art the lord of my fortune. O good lord, I am rich indeed.
But what


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

kick

Rise of the Tomb Raider

Gorgon!

O, where is my father?

Death shrouds my face, Tybalt.
The eyes of Tybalt are not the same Tybalt that were slain by his father.
Death, Tybalt!
Death, Tybalt!
Death, Tybalt!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!
Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!

Death!


===== CHECKPOINT 025 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

proportional, you have to have been born here and pay taxes here. If you have not, you have got no right to live here. There is no highway, no courts, no courts of law to enforce the law.
So the law prevails.
That is what the proverb says.


ROMEO.
Ain’t thine eye,
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou art a fool
And thou that speak’st thus: O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.
O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that art not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not payd.

O, thou that speak’st thus:
Thou blind eye, thou that is not pay


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

HCULIET.
My eyes, thou art not there.

ROMEO.
What, if the light of thy beauty be dim?

ROMEO.
I would I were there, and hence I’ll stay.

JULIET.
Why, love, have I found thy remedy?

ROMEO.
I am not well, and thou wilt never be back again.
Thou love, dearest father, hath sold thee short,
And yet thou art well sold.
I am but a little while, and I am never out of breath.

ROMEO.
Now, love, take the remedy,
And let me comfort thee.

JULIET.
Good Mercutio, now, give me thy blessing,
And now, O be gone, away with me.

ROMEO.
I do beg your pardon, good father, and farewell.

JULIET.
Good Mercutio, now, give me thy blessing,
And now, O be gone, away with me.

ROMEO.
I do beg your pardon, good father, and farewell.

JULIET.
O blessed night, Mercutio.

ROMEO.
Ay, amen.

JULIET.
What was the matter with you, when thou hast been so long?

ROMEO.
Hie hast thou yet satisfied me,
That thou art gone ill,
Because thou art gone well,
That thou art gone well and well nourished,
And that thou art well served, I think
This thou should tell me now.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, thou hast sold me no time
For that touching me.

ULIET.
My eyes, thou art not there.

ROMEO.
What, if the light of thy beauty be dim?

ROMEO.
I would I were there, and hence I’ll stay.

JULIET.
Why, love, have I found thy remedy?

ROMEO.
I am not well, and thou wilt never be back again.
Thou love, dearest father, hath sold thee short,
And yet thou art well sold.
I am but a little while, and I am never out of breath.

ROMEO.
Now, love, take the remedy,
And let me comfort thee.

JULIET.
Good Mercutio, now, give me thy blessing,
And now, O be gone, away with me.

ROMEO.
I do beg your pardon, good father, and farewell.

JULIET.
O blessed night, Mercutio.

ROMEO.
Ay, amen.

JULIET.
What was the matter with you, when thou hast been so long?

ROMEO.
Hie hast thou yet satisfied me,
That thou art gone ill,
Because thou art gone well,
That thou art gone well and well nourished,
And that thou art well served, I think
This thou should tell me now.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, thou hast sold me no time
For that touching me.

ROMEO.
Wherefore art thou gone, Romeo?

JULIET.
I should ask thee, Nurse, where thou art?

ROMEO.
Come hither, take thou my hand.

JULIET.
Give me the book, and when thou art come,
Put me out of thy reach.
Come, let me take thee and my love.

ULIET.
What was the matter with you, when thou hast been so long?

ROMEO.
Hie hast thou yet satisfied me,
That thou art gone ill,
Because thou art gone well,
That thou art gone well and well nourished,
And that thou art well served, I think
This thou should tell me now.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, thou hast sold me no time
For that touching me.

ROMEO.
Wherefore art thou gone, Romeo?

JULIET.
I should ask thee, Nurse, where thou art?

ROMEO.
Come hither, take thou my hand.

JULIET.
Give me the book, and when thou art come,
Put me out of thy reach.
Come, let me take thee and my love.

JULIET.
The kisses I gave you were love, love itself
How could I love a hundred kisses?

ULIET.
O blessed night, Mercutio.

ROMEO.
Ay, amen.


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

situations

If this were so, it should have been prevented
By the time it was discovered that all the
Mercutio and Capulet were dead
By Phoebus and the rest. It was therefore
A most discreet assembly, and all these
Things would have ended well; for henceforth
A burnt-out churchyard
Should belong entirely to Tybalt,
And Tybalt himself, that married Juliet,
And married Tybalt an honourable man.

The churchyard should be a receptacle,
For there should belong to all the holy men
Whose vestal vestal robes may be comfortable;
For Phoebus, Tybalt, Fortune, Tybalt,
Ere they have sold all their merchandise.

ROMEO.
Indeed, I am well satisfied.

EO.
Indeed, I am well satisfied.

ROMEO.
And what else of this?
I will ask that you bid farewell,
That I may go and take thy name
In this marriage.

EO.
Indeed, I am well satisfied.

ROMEO.
And what else of this?
I will ask that you bid farewell,
That I may go and take thy name
In this marriage.

ROMEO.
Now, in thanks, Friar, I beseech you.

ROMEO.
I have many letters to send,
And you may send them to my lord and father,
Being here, to make a present intercession,
Which I think you well well possess.

ROMEO.
Hie here, my lord, at Friar Lawrence’ cell,
For I have read all these letters;
And the man’s acquaintance with thy lady
Is as rich in letters as in friendship.

ROMEO.
O be merciful to me, Mercutio,
For thou art much in thy power;
For I have read all thy letters
And give thanks to my lord for his friendship;
For which I merit his seal.

ROMEO.
I am well satisfied,
JULIET.
I have letters to send,
And you may send them to my lord and father,
Being here, to make a present intercession,
Which I think you well possess.

ROMEO.
Hie here, my lord, at Friar Lawrence’ cell,
For I have read all these letters;
And the man’s acquaintance with thy lady
Is as rich in letters as in friendship.

ROMEO.
O be merciful to me, Mercutio,
For thou art much in thy power;
For I have read all thy letters
And give thanks to my lord for his friendship;
For which I merit his seal.

ROMEO.
I am well satisfied,
JULIET.
I have letters to send,
And you may send them to my lord and father,
Being here, to make a present intercession,
Which I think you well possess.

ROMEO.
Hie here, my lord, at Friar Lawrence’ cell,
For I have read all these letters;
And the man’s acquaintance with thy lady
Is as rich in letters as in friendship.

ROMEO.
O be merciful to me, Mercutio,
For thou art much in thy power;
For I have read all thy letters
And give thanks to my lord for his friendship;
For which I merit his seal.

ROMEO.
I am well satisfied,

JULIET.
I have letters to send,
And you may send them to my lord and father,
Being here, to make a present intercession,
Which I think you well possess.

ROMEO.
Hie here, my lord, at Friar Lawrence’ cell,
For I have read all these letters;
And the man’s acquaintance with thy lady
Is as rich in letters as in friendship.

ROMEO.
O be merciful to me, Mercutio,
For thou art much in thy power;
For I have read all thy letters
And give thanks to my lord for his friendship;
For which I merit his seal.

ROMEO.
I am well satisfied,

JULIET.
Good faith, I am not much; but methinks
My lord and myself are better off,
For we have but a touch of our fortune
In this marriage; and yet we are as yet
Not in marriage at all.

EO.
Indeed, I am well satisfied.

ROMEO.
And what else of this?
I will ask that you bid farewell,
That I may go and take thy name
In this marriage


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

conjrails and I will die. Then disperse, and be gone.


JULIET.
The doors of heaven open, and I behold thy charnel-house.

EO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

EO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-chic chamber-keeper, come hither immediately
To help me sort these slain of all my intents.

ROMEO.
Come hither, madam; come hither, good night,
Thy sickly-


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

answered to this,
Dost thou not speak more?
Or is it my turn now? O thou wilt not bid farewell?

ROMEO. No!
I have forgot thee; for fear thou wilt not speak.
But I beseech thee, farewell,
And I beseech thee not to interrupt.

ROMEO. O sweet Juliet! O holy Juliet!

ROMEO. Get thee to thy right hand again,
And do thy neighbour’s will faithfully,
In as many words as thou can remember.

ROMEO. I am gone; I am not now. I see
A new face, more excellent in beauty than I
In ten thousand years. O my God!

ROMEO. But my heart’s true love fails;
A hurt is added to love’s sadness. O tell me, tell me, what’s wrong?

ROMEO. A sore wound, or both?
I am envious, for I am jealous;
But joy grows more rich in love from my pains;
More is wanting, and more needful,
Much more. Love itself is more than love itself;
More than art, more than religion; more than fortune; more than all this.
I have more in love, more than in fear;
More than in vanity, more than in want, more
More than fortune, more than all this;
More than philosophy, more than all this.

ROMEO. Thus says my dearest love, loving father:

I will henceforth be like thee, even to thee,
And I will, too, live as thou dost, till thou mattain.

ROMEO. Say me not, cousin; thou know’st what I am’st wilt do.

EO. But my heart’s true love fails;
A hurt is added to love’s sadness. O tell me, tell me, what’s wrong?

ROMEO. A sore wound, or both?
I am envious, for I am jealous;
But joy grows more rich in love from my pains;
More is wanting, and more needful,
Much more. Love itself is more than love itself;
More than art, more than religion; more than fortune; more than all this.
I have more in love, more than in fear;
More than in vanity, more than in want, more
More than all this;
More than philosophy, more than all this.

ROMEO. Thus says my dearest love, loving father:
I will henceforth be like thee, even to thee,
And I will, too, live as thou dost, till thou mattain.

ROMEO. Say me not, cousin; thou know’st what I am’st wilt do.

ROMEO. O be gone, my boy.

EO.
O sweet Juliet! O holy Juliet!

ROMEO. Get thee to thy right hand again,
And do thy neighbour’s will faithfully,
In as many words as thou can remember.

ROMEO. I am gone; I am not now. I see
A new face, more excellent in beauty than I
In ten thousand years. O my God!

ROMEO. But my heart’s true love fails;
A hurt is added to love’s sadness. O tell me, tell me, what’s wrong?

ROMEO. A sore wound, or both?
I am envious, for I am jealous;
But joy grows more rich in love from my pains;
More is wanting, and more needful,
Much more. Love itself is more than love itself;
More than art, more than religion; more than fortune; more than all this.
I have more in love, more than in fear;
More than in vanity, more than in want, more
More than all this;
More than philosophy, more than all this.

ROMEO. So says my dearest love, loving father:
I will henceforth be like thee, even to thee,
And I will, too, live as thou dost, till thou mattain.

ROMEO. Say me not, cousin; thou know’st what I am’st wilt do.

ROMEO. I am gone; I am not now. I see
A new face, more excellent in beauty than I
In ten thousand years. O my God!

ROMEO. But my heart’s true love fails;
A hurt is added to love’s sadness. O tell me, tell me, what’s wrong?

ROMEO. A sore wound, or both?
I am envious,


===== CHECKPOINT 026 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

stat and have health or do the two. If you need help with that, please get in touch with me!

Tybalt

Tybalt is my dear friend and is the father of the Church of the Jews.

Is the Prince so Merciful?

I do not know, for I do not know his true name,
And I cannot but be very thankful when that Prince is near.

My Prince?

I know not, but there is no Prince but Tybalt near.


Tybalt is my dear friend and is the father of the Church of the Jews.

Is the Prince so Merciful?

I do not know, for I do not know his true name,
And I cannot but be very thankful when that Prince is near.

My Prince?

I know not, but there is no Prince but Tybalt near.

Tybalt, what news?

Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.


JULIET.
What news?

Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

I am not at liberty now, and the Prince calls,
Which brings me here from Tybalt’s grave,—
Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead, banished.

Tybalt is dead,


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

provide to the Church the grace of God by which he gave this Church.
For when I came to you, I promised to attend to your behalf, and you did.
Yet I felt heavy business. Therefore you are gone; I am leaving.
Therefore farewell, good man; I trust you will not return.

Farewell, good man.

The Friar

Away to Heaven.

What say ye? I see you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

Away to Heaven, what say ye? I have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I do wish to speak to you, but I fear you have not yet.
I am too impatient, too hungry. I cannot stand it further.

Do not despair, my dear friend.
Give me a kiss, and I shall be gone.

I am gone, I know it! I have been here all along, and have forgot it.

O, I do remember that you were there!

My love, give me a kiss, and I shall be gone.

O God, how I must forget to look at you!

It was a happy farewell, though, I think, long since past.

Love, give me a kiss, and I shall be gone.

I am gone, I know it! I have been here all along, and have forgot it.
O, I do remember that you were there!
My love, give me a kiss, and I shall be gone.

O God, how I must forget to look at you!
It was a happy farewell, though, I think, long since past.

I should have known that by now.

But I should have known better, for love.

If it were so, my dear Rosaline, let it be so.
I am sorry, dear Rosaline; I am sorry that I cannot convey to you this letter,

as presently written, that the matter be left to your wish.
Your health, my lord, be well.

’Tis not time yet to weep, my poor soul; it will not be time till tomorrow.

Tomorrow I come to you, and find you there.


Prayer for the Prince

Away to Heaven.

What say ye? I see you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.
I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I feel that you have left. I have no one to speak with you.

I


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

possess to be a saint. But I am told that all men sin to be saints’s saints. Therefore, though I am a saint, yet I am not a saint.

I am told by a lady that she is a saint, and I have sin’d the name.

How would a maiden blush?’
Why would a man blush, if she were a saint?

If a man blush, he would blush as well for having been a saint,
For he was born with sinners in him, and she bore with him many sinners. But he lives; hence is no need of blush.

So why is’t a man’s blush? It is the reverse. A man’s blush is a joyful feeling,
A cheerful feeling that he puts forward as a proof of the truth. It is his own merit that makes him blush.

’But how can’t a lady blush? That is a question I cannot answer.

’But if a man blush, he would blush as well for having been a saint,
For he was born with sinners in him, and she bore with him many sinners. But he lives; hence is no need of blush.
So why is’t a man’s blush? It is the reverse. A man’s blush is a joyful feeling,
A cheerful feeling that he puts forward as a proof of the truth. It is his own merit that makes him blush.

’But how can’t a lady blush? That is a question I cannot answer.

Tut, thou say’st not the reverse, I would but thou wilt,
So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

Tut thou say’st not the reverse, I would but thou wilt,
So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

Therefore, if a man blush, he would blush as well for having been a saint,
For he was born with sinners in him, and she bore with him many sinners. But he lives; hence is no need of blush.
So why is’t a man’s blush? It is the reverse. A man’s blush is a joyful feeling,
A joyful feeling that he puts forward as a proof of the truth. It is his own merit that makes him blush.

’But how can’t a lady blush? That is a question I cannot answer.

Tut, thou say’st not the reverse, I would but thou wilt,
So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

Tut thou say’st not the reverse, I would but thou wilt,
So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

Therefore, if a man blush, he would blush as well for having been a saint,
For he was born with sinners in him, and she bore with him many sinners. But he lives; hence is no need of blush.

So why is’t a man’s blush? It is the reverse. A man’s blush is a joyful feeling,
A joyful feeling that he puts forward as a proof of the truth. It is his own merit that makes him blush.

’But how can’t a lady blush? That is a question I cannot answer.

Tut, thou say’st not the reverse, I would but thou wilt,
So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

Tut thou say’st not the reverse, I would but thou wilt,
So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie, and a lie-den.

So thou canst speak’st,
Which would be deceit, lie


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

xes of this life!
My lady, what joy was there when thou dost cut thy youth in two?
’Twixt her cheeks was sweet morn and sweet fury;
And in her breast were fiend-like tigers’s gorging upon the ground.
What’s in a gentleman’s breast? Let me begin by saying it was mine.

When I was a lad, I was married. Then came Romeo, and he took me.
And what did I do? I wrung my hands,
And tried to move my Romeo’s arm. Both my hands wrung,
But my Romeo did not touch my hand. Then went I to hell!

I did not die before I was married,
But was castrated, and buried with my grave bandage.

Did not Romeo, who was the father of this church, kill my cousin?
O, why, then, did I but weep?

For fear of that he would kill me.

JULIET.
What’s Romeo?
‘Why, for fear of being overheard, do I interrupt him.

ROMEO.
Nay, I see. I am sure he is not here.
’Tis no sin, that would hide his face. What’s he? Romeo!
‘What’s he? What was he that cut my youth in two?

ROMEO.
A fair maid. And yet she hath a point of beauty,
Yet pale in measure, yet full of grace.

ROMEO.
I know how I am meant to be bent. So I bid you kiss my hand,
And when I do so kiss, you shake my hand,
And my Romeo’s will be smooth in joint.

ROMEO.
Nurse? What are you, then?
How doth your mistress play with my finger?
’What, shall I say no to this? Is it not so?

JULIET.
Nurse! Why, do you want to be mad,
But you cannot do it till you have tried it.
’Thou wilt have it worse. Do not give me that comb.
Did not my mistress use that in that motion?
’Why, poor Nurse, was my hand faster than that of another?
’Give me my Juliet. Did I not grow fond of that?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art mad. What of that?

ULIET.
Nurse! Why, do you want to be mad,
But you cannot do it till you have tried it.
’Thou wilt have it worse. Do not give me that comb.
Did not my mistress use that in that motion?
’Why, poor Nurse, was my hand faster than that of another?
’Give me my Juliet. Did I not grow fond of that?

JULIET.
My lord, thou art mad. What of that?

JULIET.
I have bought my Juliet.

ULIET.
My lord, thou art mad. What of that?

JULIET.
I have bought my Juliet.

JULIET.
Is that not a cock or a mare?

ULIET.
No, sir, a cock is not a mare.

ULIET.
No, sir, a cock is not a mare.

JULIET.
And so hath her chambermaid, or Nurse?

ULIET.
No, sir, a cock is not a mare.

JULIET.
And so hath her chambermaid, or Nurse?

JULIET.
Good saint, she was bought.

ULIET.
If she were she had she would have bought it.

ULIET.
Not a cock or a mare?

JULIET.
And so hath her chambermaid, or Nurse?

JULIET.
Good saint, she was bought.

JULIET.
Did she sell it at all?

JULIET.
As if she did sell it,
In a wink, as if she were sold a ring.

ULIET.
Nurse! Why dost thou have a cat,
Because I never have one?

ULIET.
How doth my mistress play with my finger?
’Why dost thou have a cat,
Because I never have one?

JULIET.
Was my maidenhead a torch,
To help me to sing?

ULIET.
Nurse! Why dost thou have a cat


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Asheville. And as I neared the point, I saw the bottom of the bank, and saw it in yellow, in spite of all the dark, in this gorgeous sea. And again, as I rode, I rose, and saw in that I rose, that in this I might live. And again, as I rode, I rose, and saw in that I rose, that in this I might live. And again, as I rode, I rose, and saw in that I rose, that in this I might live.

JULIET.
Come hither, Friar, I pray thee, and all my holy business men, attend this present business of marriage.

EO.
And hither, Friar, I pray thee, and all my holy business men, attend this present business of marriage.

JULIET.
Come hither, Friar, I pray thee, and all my holy business men, attend this present business of marriage.

JULIET.
Indeed thou hast met many of my confid’d ladies,
And they have all acted as you wish; and I beseech thee, join me in prayer.

JULIET.
Nurse! What news? Did your cousin die? What hast thou to do there?

EO.
Indeed thou hast met many of my confid’d ladies,
And they have all acted as you wish; and I beseech thee, join me in prayer.

JULIET.
Nurse! What news? Did your cousin die? What hast thou to do there?

JULIET.
I have some food for sore eyes,
And I have no pains to do them.

EO.
So shalt thou take them. Good, good Nurse!

ULIET.
Indeed thou hast met many of my confid’d ladies,
And they have all acted as you wish; and I beseech thee, join me in prayer.

JULIET.
Nurse! What news? Did your cousin die? What hast thou to do there?

JULIET.
I have some food for sore eyes,
And I have no pains to do them.

JULIET.
And he gave us no remedy.

ULIET.
Good gentleman, you have acted with an unworthiness and lenity which makes even love sour.

ULIET.
But, what is his remedy?
A word or two of harsh physic,
Which may but serve him well.

ULIET.
Nurse! What news? Did your cousin die? What hast thou to do there?

JULIET.
I have some food for sore eyes,
And I have no pains to do them.

JULIET.
And he gave us no remedy.

JULIET.
What is his remedy?
A word or two of harsh physic,
Which may but serve him well.

JULIET.
Well, good gentleman, you have acted with an unworthiness and lenity which makes even love sour.

JULIET.
If a storm is roaring in his direction, and Romeo is dead,
Which would be a sour blushing blush to be on his death bed,
And he would make no use of it.
Well, look, Romeo is gone, and his ghostly shroud is almost gone.
What a misfortune that is!

ULIET.
If a storm is roaring in his direction, and Romeo is dead,
Which would be a sour blushing blush to be on his death bed,
And he would make no use of it.
Well, look, Romeo is gone, and his ghostly shroud is almost gone.
What a misfortune that is!

JULIET.
I do know how to talk to Romeo.
I have known him to be gentle, wise, and gentle, and gentle,
I should forget all those.

ULIET.
Well, good gentleman, you have acted with an unworthiness and lenity which makes even love sour.

JULIET.
If a storm is roaring in his direction, and Romeo is dead,
Which would be a sour blushing blush to be on his death bed,
And he would make no use of it.
Well, look, Romeo is gone, and his ghostly shroud is almost gone.
What a misfortune that is!

JULIET.
I do know how to talk to Romeo.
I have known him to be gentle, wise, and gentle,
I should forget all those.

JULIET.
Did I speak lightly of him before? And how, and what is the consequence?

JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 027 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

O’d speak!
I am not welcome here; I’ll be slain.

JULIET.
Come hither, poor fellow!
If you would be so kind, I would hasten the way.
The stony rocks are full of death,
And lo! the fearful tributary drops are full of life.
What, shall we call this our friend?

ULIET.
Come hither, poor fellow! If you would be so kind, I would hasten the way.
The stony rocks are full of death,
And lo! the fearful tributary drops are full of life.
What, shall we call this our friend?

JULIET.
Go but with love, and do not take me prisoner.

JULIET.
O, my name is Balthasar!

ULIET.
I would never, ever leave thee.

JULIET.
O, my name is Balthasar!

JULIET.
What more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?
O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden
That one of the sweetest men I know
Can make the mixture sullen with sadness?

O, what more is there to say in a death so sudden


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

DoddEO.
And thou hast made the acquaintance of many excellent gentlemen,
Being but twenty-four hours from now
I shall not return to thy lady till
My husband comes to take his present.
If thou jealous dost, thou wilt send me poison,
And I’ll be more discreet in my conduct
Than with thy dastard lips.
Therefore, gentlemen, be merciful and do not provoke me,
This letter should not be read by my husband.

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
Tell me not, Juliet, that thou art so bold.
I must confess that I am too advanced
To enjoy thee at this late hour.
Let me be put to death immediately.
’Tis the hour when the world’s heat and fury
Come to an end. Get thee hence.
O, tell me not, Juliet, that thou art so bold.
I must confess that I am too advanced
To enjoy thee at this late hour.
Let me be put to death immediately.
’Tis the hour when the world’s heat and fury
Come to an end. Get thee hence.

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
Tell me not, Juliet, that thou art so bold.
I must confess that I am too advanced
To enjoy thee at this late hour.
Let me be put to death immediately.
’Tis the hour when the world’s heat and fury
Come to an end. Get thee hence.

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
Tell me not, Juliet, that thou art so bold.

I must confess that I am too advanced
To enjoy thee at this late hour.
Let me be put to death immediately.
’Tis the hour when the world’s heat and fury
Come to an end. Get thee hence.

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
Do not forget to keep up the cheerful fire
By following the gentle lark,
Or else I’ll kill thee.
I have read many books in my brief time
But none of them have sold so well as this.
What can I say? Comfort me, dear Juliet,
Stay with me while I prepare to die.
Do not take this letter, or else I will cut thee short.

ROMEO.
Death? O be gone, gentle Nurse.

ROMEO.
What poison shall I resort to in this desperate attempt?
My lady is but twelve years old;
Her poison is deadly. Dear Nurse,
Thy health is very well. I beseech thee,
Take thou my life. But, dear Nurse,
Do not take this letter. I am too late.
What poison shall I resort to in this desperate attempt?
My lady is but twelve years old;
Her poison is deadly. Dear Nurse,
Thy health is very well. I beseech thee,
Take thou my life. But, dear Nurse,
Do not take this letter. I am too late.

What poison shall I resort to in this desperate attempt?
My lady is but twelve years old;
Her poison is deadly. Dear Nurse,
Thy health is very well. I beseech thee,
Take thee my life. But, dear Nurse,
Do not take this letter. I am too late.


JULIET.
Thou detestable ghost, thou vile spite!
’I beseech thee, take thy life. But, dear Nurse,
Do not take this letter. I am too late.

What poison shall I resort to in this desperate attempt?
My lady is but twelve years old;
Her poison is deadly. Dear Nurse,
Thy health is very well. I beseech thee,
Take thee my life. But, dear Nurse,
Do not take this letter. I am too late.

JULIET.
O thou detestable ghost!

ROMEO.
Thou detestable ghost, thou vile spite!

ROMEO.
’Tis the hour when the world’s heat and fury
Come to an end. Get thee hence.

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
What letter?

ROMEO.
I’ll be more discreet in my conduct
Than with thy dastard lips.
Therefore, gentlemen, be merciful and do not provoke me,
This letter should not be read by my husband.

ROM


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

geneticallyEO, the Titan, and so on. But as for the rest,—as for the world, let me first tell you, that, if you follow me, you shall encounter me before my very eyes. Look, thou youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? No. Think upon it; for what sin can be sinned to mortals so?

I beseech thee, youth, forbear this apace, which is an honourable palace.

O, how much more honourable is this palace than this palace itself? O, who would devise such a palace?

O, what more favour can I do to thee in that palace than by making thee an enquirer?

Bid me at once with a golden ring, and bid me leap upon a rapier?

Wilt thou then not hurry hither? Take leave, and bid me come to thee tonight.

See, youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? Yes. Think upon it; for what sin can be sinned to mortals so?

I beseech thee, youth, forbear this apace, which is an honourable palace.

O, how much more honourable is this palace than this palace itself? O, who would devise such a palace?

O, what more favour can I do to thee in that palace than by making thee an enquirer?

Bid me at once with a golden ring, and bid me leap upon a rapier?

Wilt thou then not hurry hither? Take leave, and bid me come to thee tonight.

See, youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? Yes. Think upon it; for what sin can be sinned to mortals so?

I beseech thee, youth, forbear this apace, which is an honourable palace.

O, how much more honourable is this palace than this palace itself? O, who would devise such a palace?

O, what more favour can I do to thee in that palace than by making thee an enquirer?

Bid me at once with a golden ring, and bid me leap upon a rapier?

Wilt thou then not hurry hither? Take leave, and bid me come to thee tonight.

See, youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? Yes. Think upon it; for what sin can be sinned to mortals so?

I beseech thee, youth, forbear this apace, which is an honourable palace.

O, how much more honourable is this palace than this palace itself? O, who would devise such a palace?

O, what more favour can I do to thee in that palace than by making thee an enquirer?

Bid me at once with a golden ring, and bid me leap upon a rapier?

Wilt thou then not hurry hither? Take leave, and bid me come to thee tonight.

See, youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? No. Think upon it; for what sin can be sinned to mortals so?

I beseech thee, youth, forbear this apace, which is an honourable palace.

O, how much more honourable is this palace than this palace itself? O, who would devise such a palace?

O, what more favour can I do to thee in that palace than by making thee an enquirer?

Bid me at once with a golden ring, and bid me leap upon a rapier?

Wilt thou then not hurry hither? Take leave, and bid me come to thee tonight.

See, youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? No. Think upon it; for what sin can be sinned to mortals so?

I beseech thee, youth, forbear this apace, which is an honourable palace.

O, how much more honourable is this palace than this palace itself? O, who would devise such a palace?

O, what more favour can I do to thee in that palace than by making thee an enquirer?

Bid me at once with a golden ring, and bid me leap upon a rapier?

Wilt thou then not hurry hither? Take leave, and bid me come to thee tonight.

See, youth, I am not an angel.

Hast thou learnt me that fortune is a fearful thing? No. Think upon it; for what


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

GPA is a very simple gun, which needs only a pair of pliers to fire. It is a good all-rounder and is very fast.

It is not my purpose to prove that it is a good all rounder, for it may be true. But I should like to know what your meanness is, and why you think that I cannot beat it to a winning point. I do think that you have got the point.

Madam, there are many of the better cannon in the world. I have already said that Paris is my motherland. How well you know her.

Ay, I am sorry, what cause do you think me obstinate in your opposition to my cousin’s request that she return to Paris?

Madam, the siege of Paris is like that of a palace, an outrage that can be felt both at once.

This cousin is my husband. I do not love her, for I do not wish to have a civil marriage, and she is no longer my husband.

Madam, you have made me despair, and I rage. Paris is her; I am her enemy, and she is not my husband.

Madam, what can I do now?


EO.
I do, and when you are at leisure I am out of breath, and therefore will not stand till you have exhaled.
I have been married to one Paris, who is a cousin, and yet she dies young.
Madam, what can I do now?

JULIET.
And so, my poor cousin, now that you have married her, I will take the youthful maidenhead and use it to my advantage.
I have never been so foolish before, and having learnt how to read, I now intend to practise it.
Beautiful scene.

EO.
And so, my poor cousin, now that you have married her, I will take the youthful maidenhead and use it to my advantage.
I have never been so foolish before, and having learnt how to read, I now intend to practise it.

Beautiful scene.

JULIET.
Thou knowest, I am sorry, what cause do you think me obstinate in your opposition to my cousin’s request that she return to Paris?

Madam, the siege of Paris is like that of a palace, an outrage that can be felt both at once.
This cousin is my husband. I do not love her, for I do not wish to have a civil marriage, and she is no longer my husband.

Madam, what can I do now?

JULIET.
And so, my poor cousin, now that you have married her, I will take the youthful maidenhead and use it to my advantage.

I have never been so foolish before, and having learnt how to read, I now intend to practise it.

Beautiful scene.

JULIET.
Art thou no match?

EO.
And so, my poor cousin, now that you have married her, I will take the youthful maidenhead and use it to my advantage.

I have never been so foolish before, and having learnt how to read, I now intend to practise it.

Beautiful scene.

JULIET.
Thou knowest, I am sorry, what cause do you think me obstinate in your opposition to my cousin’s request that she return to Paris?

Madam, the siege of Paris is like that of a palace, an outrage that can be felt both at once.
This cousin is my husband. I do not love her, for I do not wish to have a civil marriage, and she is no longer my husband.

Madam, what can I do now?

JULIET.
And so, my poor cousin, now that you have married her, I will take the youthful maidenhead and use it to my advantage.

I have never been so foolish before, and having learnt how to read, I now intend to practise it.

Beautiful scene.

JULIET.
Art thou no match?

JULIET.
How doth that noise lodge itself in my heart, a beat that can make my limbs shake?
This is not Romeo!

EO.
I do, and when you are at leisure I am out of breath, and therefore will not stand till you have exhaled.
I have been married to one Paris, who is a cousin, and yet she dies young.
Madam, what can I do now?

JULIET.
And so, my poor cousin, now that you have married her, I will take the youthful maidenhead and use it to my advantage.
I have never been so foolish before, and having learnt how to read,


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Nos. 17, I will leave you, and behold,—

A triumphant scene. Lawrence! Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?


ROMEO.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

EO.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
O my God! Did my heart beat thus so lightly?

EO.
Did my heart beat thus lightly?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

EO.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
O my God! Did my heart beat thus lightly?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Was Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Did Romeo slain? O tell me, is that not so?

JULIET.
Thou art my Romeo, the sick man of Banistery!

JULIET.
Had he slain him, I would have torn him limb from limb,
But sparingly I have slain him.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, ay; thou art my Romeo,
The more I behold his mangled mangled face;
For fear of him I will kill thee,
If thou swear my love upon his head.

JULIET.
Did Romeo slain? O


===== CHECKPOINT 028 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Flow1:

Lucio, I have sinned!

ROMEO.
O God! Which of our own?
How shall I know it? Is it not Romeo?

ROMEO.
Nurse, can you speak? I have a poison to kill.
The poison?

ROMEO.
O God! How doth that woo? Poor devil, what is it?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should inflict.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush! This is too much for me. Juliet’s dead,
My true love dead, and Romeo’s dead.
Hush!
O, what if Juliet dies then? What of that?
What if he be dishonour’d, and that she live
In hell with him?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should inflict.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush! This is too much for me. Juliet’s dead,
My true love dead, and Romeo’s dead.

Hush!
O, what if Juliet dies then? What of that?
What if he be dishonour’d, and that she live
In hell with him?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should inflict.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
How shall I know it? Is it not Romeo?

ROMEO.
Nurse, can you speak? I have a poison to kill.
The poison?

ROMEO.
O God! How doth that woo? Poor devil, what is it?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should inflict.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
What if Juliet dies then? What of that?
What if he be dishonour’d, and that she live
In hell with him?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should be.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
What if Juliet dies then? What of that?
What if he be dishonour’d, and that she live
In hell with him?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should be.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
I’ll be with you in hell for that.

EO.
O God! How doth that woo? Poor devil, what is it?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should be.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
What if Juliet dies then? What of that?
What if he be dishonour’d, and that she live
In hell with him?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should be.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
What if Juliet dies then? What of that?
What if he be dishonour’d, and that she live
In hell with him?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should be.

ROMEO.
It shall be death, and Juliet my wife.

ROMEO.
Hush!
I have heard them say so.

EO.
O God! How doth that woo? Poor devil, what is it?
The woe is such a thing to me,
As to provoke the farthest thing in the world to enquire
What poison this poison should be.

ROMEO.
It shall


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

CivicULUS.
Nay, good sir; and to-morrow I will go with you, and stay with you all the day, till the news be known.

ROMEO.
What news?
What news?
What hast thou heard?
How doth my father?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

EO.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULIET.
What hast thou done?

JULI


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Woou-Cheol B.
I have found the place.
It is a joyful mansion,
It is full of sweet smells,
And the ladies are well-behaved;
My trooping forms are quite strong,
And all my needs are satisfied. I have no need of envious looks,
Or beggars, for I have got nothing. Therefore stay.

O, stay, stay! There is more to come
Soon, when I have leisure.

Henceforward I descend, and behold the clouds
Seeking adventure from unseen ends,
From off the face of the earth I soar.

Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair

O, stay, stay! There is more to comeSoon, when I have leisure.

ROMEO.
I have found the place.
It is a joyful mansion,
It is full of sweet smells,
And the ladies are well-behaved;
My trooping forms are quite strong,
And all my needs are satisfied. I have no need of envious looks,
Or beggars, for I have got nothing. Therefore stay.

ROMEO.
Stay, stay! There is more to comeSoon, when I have leisure.

ROMEO.
A happy trumpet soundlings hoarsely in the air
My heavenly name is blessed,
And Mercutio gives me everlasting life.

ROMEO.
Good heavens, that I may hear your loving name before I die.
Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

EO.
Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair

Away to heaven from these extremes!
Here lies peace!

ROMEO.
Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair
Away to heaven from these extremes!
Here lies peace!

ROMEO.
A happy trumpet soundlings hoarsely in the air
My heavenly name is blessed,
And Mercutio gives me everlasting life.

ROMEO.
Good heavens, that I may hear your loving name before I die.
Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
I am going with you hither, my love, to Lawrence’ cell.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Good lad, I am going well.
Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Hath that name thus spoken, or did I hear it so?
How I should feel upon hearing it,
Or would I rather say farewell, or bid you come and weep?

EO.
Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair
Away to heaven from these extremes!
Here lies peace!

ROMEO.
Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair
Away to heaven from these extremes!
Here lies peace!

ROMEO.
I am going with you hither, my love, to Lawrence’ cell.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Good lad, I am going well.

Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Hath that name thus spoken, or did I hear it so?
How I should feel upon hearing it,
Or would I rather say farewell, or bid you come and weep?

This blessed month is twenty years hence;
So long I live a prosperous and prosperous man.

EO.
Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair
Away to heaven from these extremes!
Here lies peace!

ROMEO.
Peace comes early in the day,
And loving Mercutio shows no mercy,
But smiles warmly upon the face of the fair
Away to heaven from these extremes!
Here lies peace!

ROMEO.
I am going with you hither, my love, to Lawrence’ cell.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Good lad, I am going well.

Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Hath that name thus spoke, or did I hear it so?
How I should feel upon hearing it,
Or would I rather say farewell, or bid you come and weep?
This blessed month is twenty years hence;
So long I live


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Eckgvillain, we shall all be satisfied, and leave you to your grief till we shall have the means to move on, or you shall rather stay with the churchyard and starve, or send me letters urging me to come forward and tear the walls off of the churchyard and tear the church down, and have my churchyard torn up, thus procuring for an enemy church to come and take the church from me, thus choking me up, thus choking you up so that I cannot bear to be here for more than an hour.

ROMEO.
But wherefore, gentle father, do you think I should resort to this rather than resort to another?

JULIET.
I do not think so.

ROMEO.
Indeed, it is a sin to disobey the divine direction,
And therefore heretics and sinners must either go to hell or be banished.
Or both, if they repent.
I fear, indeed, that some day when I live, I shall swear an ungodly name against you,
And that you, an unaccustom’d fellow, will go out of your way to take my life.
But believe me, even if you could make a new man, I’ll still kill you.
If you believe in heaven, then believe me; for if you do not, I will not allow you to live.
If I were an emperor, and you did kill me, I would kill you all.
But believe me, believe me; for if you do, I’ll still be with you.

ROMEO.
I defy you, therefore, to believe me, and send word to my father and mother, that I will kill them all.
O, what news?
Your letter, you tell me not; and I will not believe it.
For heaven forbid it should be this; for what sin have I heretofore married?
Why, I believe you, too; for when you married me, you gave me the most excellent wife;
And I beg your pardon, consenting to have that same mistress again,
Which you have gave me to perform some other civil contract,
And which, upon your word, hath been ratified at the hand of the emperor.
Henceforward you have been unawares, and have tried to get me to perform some other contract.
To which I answer, by this, you have slain me.
Why, answer I, by some secret rite, which I know you will not tell me.

EO.
Indeed, it is a sin to disobey the divine direction,
And therefore heretics and sinners must either go to hell or be banished.
Or both, if they repent.
I fear, indeed, that some day when I live, I shall swear an ungodly name against you,
And that you, an unaccustom’d fellow, will go out of your way to take my life.
But believe me, even if you could make a new man, I’ll still kill you.
If you believe in heaven, then believe me; for if you do not, I will not allow you to live.
If I were an emperor, and you did kill me, I would kill you all.

ROMEO.
I defy you, therefore, to believe me, and send word to my father and mother, that I will kill them all.
O, what news?
Your letter, you tell me not; and I will not believe it.
For heaven forbid it should be this; for what sin have I heretofore married?
Why, I believe you, too; for when you married me, you gave me the most excellent wife;
And I beg your pardon, consenting to have that same mistress again,
Which you have gave me to perform some other civil contract,
And which, upon your word, hath been ratified at the hand of the emperor.
Henceforward you have been unawares, and have tried to get me to perform some other contract.
To which I answer, by this, you have slain me.
Why, answer I, by some secret rite, which I know you will not tell me.

ROMEO.
In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,
The Church’s secret religion hath been mangled by sin and murder;
Contempt for this holy religion by which I worship!
O, what more favour can I do to the Capuchin churchyard
Than by severing the walls, and by burning the Capuchin vault?
Or, if you will believe me, I will tear down the Capuchin vault,
And bury you there in a gorgeous grave, where I will preside,
And all this day I will be ere my confessor.
Now, Cap


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

PrEO.
Farewell, farewell, Tybalt.

ROMEO.
Well, farewell, and farewell, Tybalt.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROMEO.
If thou art dead, farewell, and farewell, Peter.

ROM


===== CHECKPOINT 029 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ApEO.
O shut the door, and come hither hither,
For presently I beseech you, brother, to go with me into my closet.
Come hither, let me have the necessaries.
Come hither methinks I have need of many necessaries.

ROMEO.
Bid the sick men help thee. I pray thee leave me,
And come hither today, to attend me every day in bed.
I have a faint cold fear in my bones,
That all this day I dream a ghostly apparition
Playful of my father, whom I dearly hate.
What if this ghostly presence, living in my dreams,
Subtly playing with my father, do cause my bones
To shiver with fear? What if, hearing this ghostly voice,
Than thou there, beholding my father dead,
Believing him dead, to think him gone,
To hide him in my dreams? These imaginings
Couldst thou tell me how I should forget
My father if my father were gone? O, I fear
My waking father may yet be dead.
O, what more favour can I do to my father than to live him still?

ROMEO.
Give me that bloody knife, and when thou gav’st me back,
Take with me all these presents, for I will kill thee immediately.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw!
Love, I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy bid to be saved. I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.
I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy soul from hence to bid me return.

I long to die but for thee,
Forbid thy


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

components. I will do likewise, in the name of liberty and good Government.

ROMEO.
Is the man well?

ROMEO.
Well, that I should say it was well.

ROMEO.
I believe well, that she may well trust in my true faith.

ROMEO.
I would trust no man but myself; and yet trust in my true faith.

ROMEO.
I would rather trust than swear by men I do love than by a man I do hate.

ROMEO.
I would have the honour of an unaccustom’d wife.

EO.
I would trust no man but myself; and yet trust in my true faith.

ROMEO.
I would rather trust than swear by men I do love than by a man I do hate.

ROMEO.
I would have the honour of an unaccustom’d wife.

ROMEO.
No, I am not bound by your terms.

ROMEO.
Ay me, good Mercutio, good Nurse, I am sorry you have to come to talk of this;
Your pains have been good. But they have been chiefly mine;
Your conduct owes much to this, which you must pay to my good.

ROMEO.
That which you owe is not mine. This is mine; and if you shall not pay me, I will kill you.

ROMEO.
I have got no love, and that which I have,
I am too bold,
Too bold, and am not well-suited.

EO.
I would trust no man but myself; and yet trust in my true faith.

ROMEO.
I would rather trust than swear by men I do love than by a man I do hate.

ROMEO.
I would have the honour of an unaccustom’d wife.

ROMEO.
No, I am not bound by your terms.

ROMEO.
Ay me, good Mercutio, good Nurse, I am sorry you have to come to talk of this;
Your pains have been good. But they have been chiefly mine;
Your conduct owes much to this, which you must pay to my good.

ROMEO.
That which you owe is not mine. This is mine; and if you shall not pay me, I will kill you.

ROMEO.
I have got no love, and that which I have,
I am too bold,
Too bold, and am not well-suited.

ROMEO.
Well, that I might say, good Mercutio, good Nurse, I am sorry you have to come to talk of this;
Your pains have been good. But they have been chiefly mine;
Your conduct owes much to this, which you must pay to my good.

ROMEO.
That which you owe is not mine. This is mine; and if you shall not pay me, I will kill you.

ROMEO.
Well, that I might say, good Mercutio, good Nurse, I am sorry you have to come to talk of this;
Your pains have been good. But they have been chiefly mine;
Your conduct owes much to this, which you must pay to my good.

ROMEO.
That which you owe is not mine. This is mine; and if you shall not pay me, I will kill you.

ROMEO.
Madam, the world is not my business, but hers,
That is all. O shame, madam!

EO.
I have got no love, and that which I have,
I am too bold,
Too bold, and am not well-suited.

ROMEO.
Well, that I might say, good Mercutio, good Nurse, I am sorry you have to come to talk of this;
Your pains have been good. But they have been chiefly mine;
Your conduct owes much to this, which you must pay to my good.

ROMEO.
That which you owe is not mine. This is mine; and if you shall not pay me, I will kill you.

ROMEO.
I have got no love, and that which I have,
I am too bold,
Too bold, and am not well-suited.

ROMEO.
Well, that I might say, good Mercutio, good Nurse, I am sorry you have to come to talk of this;
Your pains have been good. But they have been chiefly mine;
Your conduct owes much to this, which you must pay to my good.

ROMEO.
That which you owe is not mine. This is mine; and if you shall not pay me, I will kill you.


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

eye3-pin.jpg –
In this
I have bought the light of
All my happiness, all my misgivings.

Grief is boundless, and I will ever
Live in love with that man I love.
I have bought the mansion of sweet Nurse
Lolio, daughter of Capulet, for yonder child,
But I cannot buy him. Nurse, will you please bid her go,
Being gone, I will send her hither
With unworn shoes, to suckle the maiden nurse
From her lips till she sits up straight. Come, Nurse, come,
Give me that mattock, and when I shall be done,
Put my left arm around the needy Nurse’s breast,
And immediately suckle the maiden nurse’s breast,
With that fatal stroke of mine,
Spread my love so deep and so warm,
That the maiden nurse will blush, look on me
And say, Thou hast bought my mansion,
And yet I cannot bring it to life. Poor wretched Nurse,
Thou art bitter, and I feel sick,
Because of this stroke. Be not my nurse.
My love dies; my heart aches and dies.
Ah me, how sweet is my breath when Romeo dies,
When my Romeo is but a little boy?

It is my nurse, whom I dearly trust,
Who in turn make me swear an everlasting vow.
O, what a woe is that my vow is!
Hold, I have got a sick cousin,
Who is passing through my town,
Where my cousin is passing by. O be gone.
What say’st thou? Hast thou gone with my cousin?

I have seen my cousin’s ghost,
And am not satisfied. Be gone, Nurse.
What sin is that?

ULIET.
Ay me, what tongue can convey that voice?


ULIET.
Ay me, what tongue can convey that voice?

JULIET.
I would they had known how sweet my tongue was,
When I was little.

ULIET.
Ay me, what tongue can convey that voice?

JULIET.
I would they had known how sweet my tongue was,
When I was little.

JULIET.
Father, have mercy; that which thou hast learnt
By thy loving father, that hath rul’d the night,
He that hath mangled the youthful face,
Whate’er’s in flesh hath blood for a sore tongue,
Whate’er’s in spirit hath spirit for a sweet mouth,
Where mortals sit and wait to hear what is going on.
Be gone, my cousin. Go, away.

ULIET.
Father, have mercy; that which thou hast learnt
By thy loving father, that hath rul’d the night,
He that hath mangled the youthful face,
Whate’er’s in flesh hath blood for a sore tongue,
Whate’er’s in spirit hath spirit for a sweet mouth,
Where mortals sit and wait to hear what is going on.
Be gone, my cousin. Go, away.

JULIET.
And farewell, good Friar.

ULIET.
I would they had known how sweet my tongue was,
When I was little.

JULIET.
Father, have mercy; that which thou hast learnt
By thy loving father, that hath rul’d the night,
He that hath mangled the youthful face,
Whate’er’s in flesh hath blood for a sore tongue,
Whate’er’s in spirit hath spirit for a sweet mouth,
Where mortals sit and wait to hear what is going on.
Be gone, my cousin. Go, away.

JULIET.
And farewell, good Friar.

JULIET.
Now I have bought the light of
All my happiness, all my misgivings.
Grief is boundless, and I will ever
Live in love with that man I love.
I have bought the mansion of sweet Nurse
Lolio, daughter of Capulet, for yonder child,
But I cannot buy him. Nurse, will you please bid her go,
Being gone, I will send her hither
With unworn shoes, to suckle the maiden nurse
From her lips till she sits up straight. Come, Nurse, come,
Give me that mattock, and when I shall be done,
Put my left arm around the needy Nurse’s breast,
And immediately suckle the maiden nurse’s breast,
With that fatal stroke of mine,
Spread my love so deep and so warm,


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ListRights’s back, so I’ll pack this suit up and go with him. I have just got my new gun, so be careful, and take it out when you see me!”
’Gentlemen, I beseech you, all of you, to join my lord and father in going into battle, lest in doing so you fall into the hands of the Prince’s lie. These arms are heavy and I’ll be fairly strong, but you shall be much more than I am at this; and when you have got rid of all these arms, return to my father and tell him not to tempt him by going into another rage.
If he will go into another rage, take this letter immediately.
I beseech you all, father and son, immediately prepare to go into battle.
There is no end in sight in this assembly. Lie thou yet yet in suspense, when I’ll bring thee that trumpet sound the blows that shall determine the course of this general siege,
’exchange of weapons in sudden death, or both! Then be gone, come, and be gone with me, before I come to you, for I am come to take thee again and again.
If thou jealous dost attempt to kill me, provoke me, provoke me to rage more than by urging me to do so,
I will tear thee joint by joint, redeem thee from this outrage, by making thee an emperor,
and make thee an emperor’s paramour!
What’s this, madam? Is there a poison in this?
’Tis the Prince’s ghost that calls upon thee from heaven, urging thee to act rashly,
to provoke me to fury that cannot be prevented,
to provoke me to rage so bitterly as this,
to provoke me to wreak such a huge slaughter upon an innocent man?
So much for that.
This shall determine that.
Thus, madam, thou wilt torment me with more slaughter and more torments,
than this shall make thee an emperor.
Then, madam, be gone, and not return to this place,
to torment me with more slaughter and more torments.
For there shall be more slaughter and more torments,
more bitterly fought and more inexorable hell to come at me from the wings of this womb.
Be gone, madam.

ULIET.
O blessed be thy name, thou who art the Prince of this palace.
Thy throne is at thy feet, and thy people apace.

This palace was the heart of Tybalt’s empire,
The mouth of the tender breast of my lord’s lie,
With Tybalt’s blood hangs from his back,
Whiter than lead. Tybalt was the first to offer marriage,
And Tybalt was the first to sell his daughters. Tybalt sold them, and married Juliet,
And married Tybalt’s cousin. Tybalt’s daughters were sold before him,
And Tybalt sold them before him. This was no marriage contract.
My life was bought, and hers were sold for gold. Tybalt sold his daughters,
And sold hers for silver. These are your terms.
What of that? Answer me now.

ULIET.
O blessed be thy name, thou who art the Prince of this palace.
Thy throne is at thy feet, and thy people apace.
This palace was the heart of Tybalt’s empire,
The mouth of the tender breast of my lord’s lie,
With Tybalt’s blood hangs from his back,
Whiter than lead. Tybalt was the first to offer marriage,
And Tybalt sold them, and married Juliet,
And married Tybalt’s cousin. Tybalt’s daughters were sold before him,
And Tybalt sold them before him. This was no marriage contract.
My life was bought, and hers were sold for gold. Tybalt sold his daughters,
And sold hers for silver. These are your terms.
What of that? Answer me now.

ROMEO.
O blessed be thy name, thou who art the Prince of this palace.
Thy throne is at thy feet, and thy people apace.
This palace was the heart of Tybalt’s empire,
The mouth of the tender breast of my lord’s lie,
With Tybalt’s blood hangs from his back,
Whiter than lead. Tybalt sold them, and married Juliet,
And married Tybalt’s cousin. Tybalt’s daughters were sold before him,
And married Tybalt’s cousin. This was


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

fecture.
What did he learn at the Church of Saint Helena?
In that place are our holy relics?
Some say that our Lord took them from us;
But if so, why did he take them? Why did he not send his heralds
From thence to enforce our faith?
Or, if he were a man of divinest mind,
Would he provoke our request?
Or would he sit by and do nothing at all?

Some say that Helena was too fair;
Or, if she had been, she would have torn the fair maidenhead
From the tree; but if she had not, she would have burnt it with fire.
I do not think that the fire that burnt the maidenhead
Of Anselmo would have torn that fair maidenhead.
Therefore, on the ground that she did, I’ll pray thee, father, go out and find her.
Or if she be gone, come and find her, and take her;
And if she be gone, find her and take her, and take both;
And if she be gone, take both? And if she be gone, give me the man-servant?
Wilt thou believe me, father, that I have found my true love?
But if thou art not sure, tell me, father; or else be gone.
This is Phoebus’ lodging. This gentleman lives where he is.
Go and find him, and take him.
O, my Juliet, let him be with you.
Hold, let me speak; speak wisely;
Being counsels angel, I do think thou must press forward.
O happy scene, this hand that cut thy Juliet up,
Gorg’d thy substance with tears, and sold thee thy Juliet.

EO.
Nay, good lad; and blessed be thy mother.
Hath thou no love thou wilt not weep at my hand?
I beseech thee, youth, bid me go with thee,
To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee.
What of that? Hast thou no love?

EO.
Nay, good lad; and blessed be thy mother.
Hath thou no love thou wilt not weep at my hand?
I beseech thee, youth, bid me go with thee,
To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee.
What of that? Hast thou no love?

The Church of Saint Helena
What of that? Hast thou no love?

The Church of Saint Helena

I pray thee tell my chaplain,’s name is Peter.

EO.
Nay, good lad; and blessed be thy mother.
Hath thou no love thou wilt not weep at my hand?
I beseech thee, youth, bid me go with thee,
To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee.
What of that? Hast thou no love?
The Church of Saint Helena
What of that? Hast thou no love?

The Church of Saint Helena

I pray thee tell my chaplain,’s name is Peter.

What day is the Church of Saint Helena?
O day, be not devout; for the blessed hour
Is twelve Pertin’d.

EO.
Night.
What say’st thou, fellow pilgrims?

EO.
Night.
What say’st thou, fellow pilgrims?

Myself, my dear saint, have you lost count?

Forgetting the flattering hand, I’ll omit thee.

Henceforward I am no longer thy dearer lord;
Not even to thee, dear Paris.

EO.
Night.
What say’st thou, fellow pilgrims?
Myself, my dear saint, have you lost count?
Forgetting the flattering hand, I’ll omit thee.
Henceforward I am no longer thy dearer lord;
Not even to thee, dear Paris.
Henceforward to Friar Montague’s death
Was my soul so dear to him,
That even to a dead man, we say ’tis so.
Yet Romeo, apace, apace,
Hath death made so universal a label,
So dear to him that death should be universal.
Had he not been a Capulet,
I would have slain him in a rage,
Having drunk his life to such an excess,
That in a minute or two of his body
He would not be buried.
O, wherefore art thou Romeo’s tomb,
O hollow heap where Juliet lies?

EO.
Night.
What say’st thou, fellow pilgrims?
Myself, my dear saint, have you lost count?
Forgetting the flattering


===== CHECKPOINT 030 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

flowing.
My heart beat faster and faster and faster till I was out of breath. I felt like choking.
My eyesight was fine, but I could not move.
Farther away I saw an empty cave. Eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
I was in hell. Eyes. Eyes.
There was a face. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?
’Tis like stepping into a black grave, where death shrouds you, and those you love shroud you in darkness.

O, how can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be eyes. Eyes. Eyes.
How can there be a face when I am in this damned place?

I saw the ghostly mandrakes that were upon my back,
Gorg’d my loins, bound them with cords,
Bonded me in coffin’s cell, and loathed me there.
Some day I shall return, loathsome ghost,
I stay here, and there shall be


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

�ULIET.
Good Nurse, you are a very fair man.
But I am not well.

JULIET.
Ay, ill-suited Nurse, I am sorry,
Not this day’s business, but every day since nine o’clock,
I have been sick, and am in worse shape,
More violently so than before.

JULIET.
But in consequence thereof, shall I not be satisfied?

JULIET.
Ay, indeed, and excuse me.
’Tis but some cold night, some poison,
That pierc’d me there, and makes me forget.

JULIET.
Then pardon me, good Nurse.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, no, I do remember well where I should have been.
Where I should be now is very plainly shown;
Being, it seems, but a little before,
An hour before. O, that thou dost excuse me,
’O, that thou wilt forget.
Come, Nurse. I am content.

ULIET.
But in consequence thereof, shall I not be satisfied?

JULIET.
Ay, indeed, and excuse me.’Tis but some cold night, some poison,
That pierc’d me there, and makes me forget.

JULIET.
Then pardon me, good Nurse.

JULIET.
Ay, ay, no, I do remember well where I should have been.
Where I should be now is very plainly shown;
Being, it seems, but a little before,
An hour before. O, that thou dost excuse me,
’O, that thou wilt forget.
Come, Nurse. I am content.

JULIET.
Good Nurse, you are a very fair man.
But I am not well.

JULIET.
Go but to pray, Good Nurse, tell him you love me,
He will answer for me. It is an honour,
He hath promised it to me, and I am an answer.
It was not so long ago, Nurse,
I am a maiden now, and you have no say,
No more than I shall ever have.

ULIET.
Then pray good Mercutio, tell him you love me,
He will answer for me. It is an honour,
He hath promised it to me, and I am an answer.
It was not so long ago, Nurse,
I am a maiden now, and you have no say,
No more than I shall ever have.

JULIET.
Thou knowest I were born a maid; but how’st thou tell’st me
Who I am, that thou art my mother,
How art thou but a mouse?

ULIET.
Good Nurse, you are a very fair man.
But I am not well.

JULIET.
Go but to pray, Good Nurse, tell him you love me,
He will answer for me. It is an honour,
He hath promised it to me, and I am an answer.
It was not so long ago, Nurse,
I am a maiden now, and you have no say,
No more than I shall ever have.

JULIET.
Thou knowest I were born a maid; but how’st thou tell’st me
Who I am, that thou art my mother,
How art thou but a mouse?

JULIET.
Where was my father, and where is my mother,
How hast thou come hither, Nurse?

JULIET.
Dost thou speak ill of my father that thou dost not love?

JULIET.
What dost thou speak ill of me that I have known?

JULIET.
O God! Verily I know thee better than I know myself.

JULIET.
Ay, we are.

ULIET.
And when thou wilt speak ill, be thankful for that,
For I am but a mouse.

JULIET.
Ay, we are.

JULIET.
So tell my dear sweet cousin, good Nurse,
Give me some ink and paper, and be upon
the way, when thou wilt return.
The circumstance will serve thee well, my lord,
Good Nurse.

ULIET.
Ay, we are.

JULIET.
So tell my dear sweet cousin, good Nurse,
Give me some ink and paper, and be upon
the way, when thou wilt


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

obby” as such to the ear.
But if we forget what she is, what is she? Beauty, she says, and hearing, as well as sight, she is in one, in another, in one universal, and in her many she grows, as she divideth the sea. O, she divideth the sea, for she is many.

Again is she but a sun in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
But she is but a moon in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
She is but a dragon in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a dragon, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
She is but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
O, then, is she a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
She is but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
O, then, is she a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest; and that all these stars are opposite to one another in brightness, is shown in their forms as a meteor, and the rest as clouds, as is shown in the form of a dove.
So is she but a meteor in heaven above all the rest


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ACKA
Shall I speak ill of my lord, or doe my handiwork
To tempt thee? Pardon, father, I beseech thee, bid me speak.
Henceforward my lips have yet sufficed
In urging thee to speak ill of me.

ROMEO
Nay, father, that were I to speak ill of thee,
I should soften it by urging thee to speak ill of me.

ROMEO
I have heard thee speak ill of other men,
Some of them I adored,
Being older, they spoke ill of thee.

ROMEO
How wilt thou make me worse of myself by urging me to speak ill of thee?

ROMEO
Do not bid me peruse thy name; for shame would shameen thee,
As if that name were to me a mark.

EO
Nay, father, that were I to speak ill of thee,
I should soften it by urging thee to speak ill of me.

ROMEO
I have heard thee speak ill of other men,
Some of them I adored,
Being older, they spoke ill of thee.

ROMEO
How wilt thou make me worse of myself by urging me to speak ill of thee?

ROMEO
Do not bid me peruse thy name; for shame would shameen thee,
As if that name were to me a mark.

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

EO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;
For what good is my cousin if they dislike me?

ROMEO
Nay, father,
A proverb speaks for nothing that says amen.

ROMEO
O, so I fear. At any rate, thou wilt not be displeased,
For I am thy cousin, and cousin to thee;


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

reduce. Therefore, I beg your pardon, Veronaire, that you have forgot to allow me to be here today.
O blessed Mantua! How well I depend upon you, as I depend upon myself. Dear Friar, give me your hand immediately; and I’ll smooth this matter from my lips.

Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you; and ever rul’d by my temper.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, I beseech you, Friar, to stay the present state of your business today. I am sorry that my lord is gone, and that my lady’s health is not well. Therefore, for this I am chiefly sorry; for I have had some business in Paris, which you will attend to in time. I pray you faithfully to come to me tomorrow, and to confide in me.

ROMEO.
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since you have been gone, and I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have come to you.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what shall I do here? I beseech you, Friar, to come to me tomorrow and to confide in me.

ROMEO.
By the grace of God, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have come to you.
Farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what shall I do here? I beseech you, Friar, to come to me tomorrow and to confide in me.

ROMEO.
By the grace of God, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have came to you.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what shall I do here? I beseech you, Friar, to come to me tomorrow and to confide in me.

ROMEO.
By the grace of God, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have came to you.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
God have mercy on my conduct.

ROMEO.
The Prince’s soul hath more power in his hand than those of mine. Let us enjoin him now, Veronaire; for I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have came to you.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, what shall I do here? I beseech you, Friar, to come to me tomorrow and to confide in me.

ROMEO.
By the grace of God, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have came to you.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
God have mercy on my conduct.

ROMEO.
The Prince’s soul hath more power in his hand than those of mine. Let us enjoin him now, Veronaire; for I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have come to you.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
God have mercy on my conduct.

ROMEO.
The Prince’s soul hath more power in his hand than those of mine. Let us enjoin him now, Veronaire; for I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have came to you.

Farewell.

ROMEO.
O blessed Friar, what shall I do here? I beseech you, Friar, to come to me tomorrow and to confide in me.

ROMEO.
By the grace of God, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight, for I am but a little while since I come to you. Therefore, here comes Nurse Fortune, who is but a little while since I have came to you.

Farewell.


===== CHECKPOINT 031 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

powderULIET.
How art thou here, when thou hast no inkling of what I hereto do?
Drawing me hither, Friar, out of the shadows,
To shake the yoke of night
And help me untimely to my abode,
What I presently shall hereforth be:
But upon this account I swear by thee,
That thou and I both live
On holy terms; and that thou and I
Together, through marriage, die, ere our eyes
Henceforth will we call ourselves, on our respective terms,
A divine couple; and on our respective terms
A civil union. O, we were bought
For our civil validity by some unmoored contract,
Some holy arbiter, some mortal.

ROMEO.
Indeed, thou rich, and full of falsehood,
Gorg’d with sinners and saints, both heretics and
Wert sinners put to death.
Now, what dost thou there be but a cockatrice
That can make a righteous man smile?
Now, my lord, what of that?
For what reason do I, and all the dearest souls
In this world, attend the heavenly councils
Where every righteous man presides?
Henceforth we are, to speak the truth,
But not to live to that which thou speakest.

ROMEO.
Is not that enough, if thou speakest falsehood?

ROMEO.
Yea, ne’er I am here.

ROMEO.
And yet I must confess that I am, if I speak good of thee,
And thou seemst so discreet and discreet.

EO.
Indeed, thou rich, and full of falsehood,
Gorg’d with sinners and saints, both heretics and
Wert sinners put to death.
Now, what dost thou there be but a cockatrice
That can make a righteous man smile?
Now, my lord, what of that?
For what reason do I, and all the dearest souls
In this world, attend the heavenly councils
Where every righteous man presides?
Henceforth we are, to speak the truth,
But not to live to that which thou speakest.

ROMEO.
Is not that enough, if thou speakest falsehood?

ROMEO.
Yea, ne’er I am here.

ROMEO.
And yet I must confess that I am, if I speak good of thee,
And thou seemst so discreet and discreet.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou sham’st my soul; thou sham’st my face.
Farewell, pilgrim; farewell, good Nurse.

ROMEO.
If thou speakest falsehood, speak it with courtesy.

EO.
And yet I must confess that I am, if I speak good of thee,
And thou seemst so discreet and discreet.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou sham’st my soul; thou sham’st my face.
Farewell, pilgrim; farewell, good Nurse.

ROMEO.
If thou speakest falsehood, speak it with courtesy.

ROMEO.
Nay, good saint, I pray thee speak good of thee.
If it be so, let it be so.

ROMEO.
This shall determine our friendship. I am content;
And good pilgrim, farewell.

EO.
If thou speakest falsehood, speak it with courtesy.

ROMEO.
Nay, good saint, I pray thee speak good of thee.
If it be so, let it be so.

ROMEO.
This shall determine our friendship. I am content;
And good pilgrim, farewell.

ROMEO.
I pray thee speak good of thee.

ROMEO.
I do, and swear by thee, I do.

EO.
This shall determine our friendship. I am content;
And good pilgrim, farewell.

ROMEO.
I pray thee speak good of thee.

ROMEO.
I do, and swear by thee, I do.

ROMEO.
This shall determine our friendship. I am content;
And good pilgrim, farewell.

ROMEO.
I pray thee speak good of thee.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim.

EO.
I pray thee speak good of thee.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim.

ROMEO.
Now I do swear by thee, that thou speakest of thine own good.

ROMEO.
Nay, good pilgrim; thou hast lent me strength and strength to do thee wrong.

ROMEO


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

diced. I put my trust in the blacksmith, and the fruit of my eye did ripen in this smoke.

JULIET.
Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
What tongue shall smooth thy name?

ROMEO.
But, fair Nurse, a name to soften all
My woes
As well as hers. I am an old man,
Aged nine, and yet I am still ’st groaning
And wondering why I did’st name my name after her.

JULIET.
O blessed trumpet sound, in praise of Romeo!

ROMEO.
O blessed blessed trumpet sound, in praise of Romeo!

ROMEO.
Thou know’st my past and my present lamentation
And yet, well thou know’st where I stand.

JULIET.
‘Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

ROMEO.
Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
It was my cheek that cut thy cord,
Which ended the siege of dear Juliet’s tomb.

ROMEO.
‘Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

ROMEO.
‘Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
It was my cheek that cut thy cord,
Which ended the siege of dear Juliet’s tomb.

ROMEO.
‘Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
It was my cheek that cut thy cord,
Which ended the siege of dear Juliet’s tomb.

ROMEO.
‘Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
It was my cheek that cut thy cord,
Which ended the siege of dear Juliet’s tomb.

ROMEO.
‘Tut, tut!

ROMEO.
Give me that axe, I have need of that axe

JULIET.
What hand art thou in?

ROMEO.
I do remember the name of that maiden
Which in her rhyme speaks of comfort and comfort.

JULIET.
It was my cheek that cut thy cord,
Which ended the siege of dear Juliet’s


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

hypocritical-exactly the sort of thing that I should have been thinking, had it not been for her. So sweet a heart I love,—the sound of sweet joy in my ears,—sweet enough that I cease to be sad and think it was my own sadness.
So tedious a life, yet so fair and joyful to be with a villain so fair.
This is no villain. It was a dream. And what a villain was she, that made me believe it! It was the fairest night I have ever known!
Away to heaven she made me laugh,
For she is gone, out of sight, out of mind.
The villain she is,—the fairest villain in all the world!

Back to top


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

(!ULIET.
What more could I have for this, if my heart were like that of mine enemy?
But love, thou art worse than fiend;
And I the less guilty, for thou art worse than fiend.

ROMEO.
Then fear not, love; and thou love me,
For I am ever rul’d by thee.

ROMEO.
I fear not, love; and thou love me,
For I am ever rul’d by thee.

ROMEO.
Nay, what? But trust me, love; I will tear it off.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there,
Doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

EO.
Then fear not, love; and thou love me,
For I am ever rul’d by thee.

ROMEO.
I fear not, love; and thou love me,
For I am ever rul’d by thee.

ROMEO.
Nay, what? But trust me, love; I will tear it off.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there,
Doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

ROMEO.
Thou love’s fire
Is a precious receptacle
Of inestimable beauty. Mine own, too:
Hence my trust grows out of love, I think;
And from that I come to depend.

ROMEO.
By this I mean that thy love is wise
And not mine own that is mine enemy.

ROMEO.
Nay, what? But trust me, love; I will tear it off.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there,
Doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

ROMEO.
Thou love’s fire
Is a precious receptacle
Of inestimable beauty. Mine own, too:
Hence my trust grows out of love, I think;
And from that I come to depend.

ROMEO.
By this I mean that thy love is wise
And not mine own that is mine enemy.

ROMEO.
Nay, what? But trust me, love; I will tear it off.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there,
Doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

ROMEO.
Thou love’s fire
Is a precious receptacle
Of inestimable beauty. Mine own, too:
Hence my trust grows out of love, I think;
And from that I come to depend.

ROMEO.
By this I mean that thy love is wise
And not mine own that is mine enemy.

ROMEO.
Nay, what? But trust me, love; I will tear it off.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there,
Doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

ROMEO.
Thou love’s fire
Is a precious receptacle
Of inestimable beauty. Mine own, too:
Hence my trust grows out of love, I think;
And from that I come to depend.

ROMEO.
By this I mean that thy love is wise
And not mine own that is mine enemy.

ROMEO.
Nay, what? But trust me, love; I will tear it off.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there,
Doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

ROMEO.
And that which thou hast spoke I, the love, to confess,
Is the pathway to heaven I will descend
To climb, and that which thou hast shown
Can only lead me to that end.

EO.
’Tis the way
To fall in love
That is thy guide. Lie thou there, doing so, and I’ll teach thee how to fall in love.

ROMEO.
And that which thou hast spoke I, the love, to confess,
Is the pathway to heaven I will descend
To climb, and that which thou hast shown
Can only lead me to that


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ender1: ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber tier ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber tier ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber tier ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ ʕ’∙ backstabber ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ ʕ’∙ backstabber ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ ʕ’∙ backstabber ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ ʕ’∙ backstabber ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ ʕ’∙ backstabber ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC:! ༼ ʕ’∙ backstabber ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber quit IRC: ʕ’∙ nieces: backstabbing ༼ つ ◕_◕_◕ backstabber rank ༼ つ ◕_◕


===== CHECKPOINT 032 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

illance, she could have done the deed. He had bought her a mansion, a well-kept mansion, and in return for his favour she would have gave him a hundred lashes.

If she had acted like a fool,
She would have married the Prince; she would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a disobedient child,
She would have married the Prince.

If she had acted like a madman,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a churl,
She would have married my Nurse.

If she had acted like a cockney,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a hasty-puff,
She would have married my Nurse.

If she had acted like a serpent,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a madman,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a madman,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a madman,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a mare,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,
She would have married my Nurse.

But if she had acted like a waggoner,


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

GiULIET.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou conceal’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou conceal’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou conceal’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what a rich mask do’st thou hide’st for this face,
That is hid with streaks of sin and death?
Beauty, it seems, is for nothing. Beauty is for nothing.
Farewell, good mask; I must not go into this.

ROMEO


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

bleak of a world, and living in it must feel more like a mask than a friend.
It is not till then, when my true love begins to seem lost,
That I cease to be a mask,
And that even the strength of my love
Doth dull my darkness.
O, I have lost myself in a world
Too dear to be found. Mine is not mine own,
It is a fearful prison, and the hideous sea
Hath dischargeth all my strength.
I am a lamp, dimly illuminating the prison,
But a lamp that sees to be hid
Is but a torch, and those that do see
See through the hollow of night do not move.
I am a ghostly Prince’s mask;
My lips are like a living urinal,
My cheeks like a caveman’s flesh,
My cheeks like those of a beggar sitting up before his eyes.
My name is Tybalt, it is my love, it is my father,
And Tybalt is the mask on my face that keeps
Thee on my back. O, my true love!

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
What says he of my love?

JULIET.
O sweet Montague, tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of him.

JULIET.
What says he of my love?

JULIET.
O sweet Montague, tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of him.

JULIET.
What says he of my love?

JULIET.
O sweet Montague, tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of him.

JULIET.
What says he of my love?

JULIET.
O sweet Montague, tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of him.

JULIET.
What says he of my love?

JULIET.
Ay, my sweet Montague. Ay, my sweet Montague.

JULIET.
Bid the Mercutio for Juliet’s grave
And she found him not there.
Alack, bide time. Get thee gone, foolish lad.
Thou art not there, Juliet.
Bid the grave with thine hands,
And bury thee with thine eyes. Poor, wretched heap,
What more need thou of thine eye
To see my mangled corpse than with a single ointment
From thy dead finger? O, I see thou art not there.

JULIET.
Ay me, bid me leap, from my dead hand,
To thy bosom and shake the yoke of thine love.
Hold, Juliet, thou despairing breath,
Thy precious breath lies in my poor body.
Thy love, therefore, shall teach me ta’errot this wretched heap.
Hold, dear Juliet, take this last bite.
Hold, take, this bitter coil, fast.
Thy last kiss shall know thee better than I do now.
Thou lips are my foe, and my friend.
Let’s be brief. What’s here? A note.

JULIET.
A note purporting to show the Juliet I know
Is but ink, and that my true love
May stain it with stain’d ink. O, give me that ink again.
I will ink again, I pray thee kiss again,
Forgive me, dear love, but leave this farewell note.
I’ll dwell upon this morrow till thou return.
Good night.

ULIET.
Ay me, bid me leap, from my dead hand,
To thy bosom and shake the yoke of thine love.
Hold, Juliet, thou despairing breath,
Thy precious breath lies in my poor body.
Thy love, therefore, shall teach me ta’errot this wretched heap.
Hold, dear Juliet, take this last bite.
Hold, take, this bitter coil, fast.
Thy last kiss shall know thee better than I do now.
Thou lips are my foe, and my friend.
Let’s be brief. What’s here? A note.

JULIET.
A note purporting to show the Juliet I know
Is but ink, and that my true love
May stain it with stain’d ink. O, give me that ink again.
I will ink again, I pray thee kiss again,
Forgive me, dear love, but leave this farewell note.
I


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

QBEOB.
JULIET.
Well, if you shall devise it well, I shall practise it tonight.

ROMEO.
Indeed I shall.
JULIET.
What shall I do tonight, then?

ROMEO.
I think it best tonight,
If thou excuse me.

ROMEO.
Not tonight, but thou shalt not tonight
Unless thou excuse me.

ROMEO.
Good night, good night, good night.

ROMEO.
A kiss of sweet sweet sleep and joy attends the kiss.
I must kiss the love of thy name,
And the dear night will lie upon my lips.

JULIET.
Thou love so envious,
How would I, if I were thy only love,
Give it to thee in kisses? And in holy matrimony?

ROMEO.
Ay me; that I have kiss no longer
To stain my reputation as a holy man.

ROMEO.
And yet trust me, I will make thee a holy emperor.
What an honour, I thought you would omit.
Madam, I am never satisfied.

ROMEO.
It was thy tongue that doth stain me;
Your conduct proves me not. Get thee deliverance,
From this palace I will tear thee joint by joint,
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.

ROMEO.
Give me thy morsel of food, and I’ll bury thee in a grave.

ULIET.
Thou love so envious,
How would I, if I were thy only love,
Give it to thee in kisses? And in holy matrimony?

ROMEO.
Ay me; that I have kiss no longer
To stain my reputation as a holy man.

ROMEO.
And yet trust me, I will make thee a holy emperor.
What an honour, I thought you would omit.
Madam, I am never satisfied.

ROMEO.
It was thy tongue that doth stain me;
Your conduct proves me not. Get thee deliverance,
From this palace I will tear thee joint by joint,
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.

ROMEO.
Give me thy morsel of food, and I’ll bury thee in a grave.

JULIET.
The pilgrim of good news attends the pilgrim of ill news.

JULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, for I am not gone.

ROMEO.
If thou jealous dost stay long, then be not gone.
Come, come, come, Nurse, come, Nurse!

ULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, for I am not gone.

ROMEO.
If thou jealous dost stay long, then be not gone.
Come, come, come, Nurse, come, Nurse!

JULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, for I am not gone.

ROMEO.
If thou jealous dost stay long, then be not gone.

Come, come, come, Nurse, come, Nurse!

JULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, for I am not gone.

ROMEO.
If thou jealous dost stay long, then be not gone.
Come, come, come, Nurse, come, Nurse!

JULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, for I am not gone.

ROMEO.
If thou jealous dost stay long, then be not gone.
Come, come, come, Nurse, come, Nurse!

JULIET.
So thou blind that thou look’st on
No part of my beak, so that I may not hit thee.
So thou blind, so thou blind, that thou think’st I am a window-dweller,
Things that do not make a sound or sink,
If I live, I will die a saint.

ULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, for I am not gone.

ROMEO.
If thou jealous dost stay long, then be not gone.
Come, come, come, Nurse, come, Nurse!

JULIET.
So thou blind that thou look’st on
No part of my beak, so that I may not hit thee.


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

19851.

JULIET.
Well, what doth his lodging do?

ROMEO.
Go down and find him,
And stay the siege, forbear all opposition.

JULIET.
’Tis but thine to me to have him gone.
But what if the contrary do ensue?
What if he be ambushed? My kinsman’s men are upon thine eye;
My life is in peril. On that account, dear Tybalt,
I beseech you, gentle Tybalt, bid me come to you at once.
I have need of you both. I am grown old;
More than ever are my feasts. Therefore bid me come hither.

ROMEO.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this;
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
I am the more bound in my ways
Than with a young man that hath a torch.
What of this, cousin? Is it not my lady that sings?
Thou hear’st of voices’d within my head,
But that I do not know if they are Romeo and Juliet,
Or both? Or, if they be lovers,
What if they be lovers too? Think my hair asunder,
Being Tybalt’s, and Juliet asunder,
Being Tybalt’s mother, why do I frown?
Is my breast asunder? O, what if that love,
That which was born into being, dies out?
O my nature, grow bold and bold man,
And if my heart abhors, make me a serpent,
Who will do the thing I bid thee do,
By th’ling-pinions I’ll whip thy hair.

ROMEO.
I have need of thee both. Get thee hence, and bid me come.

ROMEO.
I beseech you both, gentle Friar, bid me come.

ROMEO.
But first let me confess my love’s worth:

ROMEO.
Amen. I am no beggar;
I have more necessaries
Than hirelings and necessaries. More hirelings, therefore;
And necessaries are hire’d. And what of mine?
Madam, what of mine? Say thou but that I am ill.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this;
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
I am the more bound in my ways
Than with a young man that hath a torch.
What of this, cousin? Is it not my lady that sings?
Thou hear’st of voices’d within my head,
But that I do not know if they are Romeo and Juliet,
Or both? Or, if they be lovers,
What if they be lovers too? Think my hair asunder,
Being Tybalt’s, and Juliet asunder,
Being Tybalt’s mother, why do I frown?
Is my breast asunder? O, what if that love,
That which was born into being, dies out?
O my nature, grow bold and bold man,
And if my heart abhors, make me a serpent,
Who will do the thing I bid thee do,
By th’ling-pinions I’ll whip thy hair.

ROMEO.
I have need of thee both. Get thee hence, and bid me come.

ROMEO.
But first let me confess my love’s worth:

ROMEO.
Amen. I am no beggar;
I have more necessaries
Than hirelings and necessaries. More hirelings, therefore;
And necessaries are hire’d. And what of mine?
Madam, what of mine? Say thou but that I am ill.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this;
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
I am the more bound in my ways
Than with a young man that hath a torch.
What of this, cousin? Is it not my lady that sings?
Thou hear’st of voices’d within my head,
But that I do not know if they are Romeo and Juliet,
Or both? Or, if they be lovers,
What if they be lovers too? Think my hair asunder,
Being Tybalt’s, and Juliet asunder,
Being Tybalt’s mother, why do I frown?
Is my breast asunder? O


===== CHECKPOINT 033 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

astronomer to send the lightest light possible into his or her sight.

JULIET.
O, that should teach you to love at first sight
As you love at heart,
And that love that sees to that which you hate,
Will teach you how to be more cheerful and civil
In your acquaintance with the town and town.

ROMEO.
So you are, and as you are, I grant it I am at leisure.
Stay yet, I beseech you, stay yet;
I know you have got my measure of love in brief.
Therefore come, bitter exhortation, follow me.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To Verona streets.

ROMEO.
What proverb says, “Thou art deceiv’d,
When thou hast no love counsellor, thou art drunk;
And untimely death puts thy neighbour before thee.”
Yet those words do add up to Romeo’s vow,
Which can only be made by hearing them said aloud.
Therefore stay yet, be sober, and thou wilt find
The secret of thy unstain’d love in brief.

ROMEO.
I have a sick man, and that he is going mad,
My best friend is dead; I am fortune’s fool;
I’ll say yon true; but Romeo’s true fear cannot furnish excuse.
What if that my true love,
Which was the substance of my temper,
Shall be combin’d, and discovered
In some other madman’s abominable passion,
Which, by some strange influence of my own,
Could bestow such excess love upon myself,
That I would revolt against it, and be an Atheist.
Would this be so? That I should revolt,
Which, having learnt this art, should devise an end.

ROMEO.
Not I, methinks it were a more right conceit,
Than madmen’s wings, bent like madmen’s mandrakes,
Driving hither from the farthest east,
To soar their dismal sundering clouds,
And wreak their dismal havoc on the sea.

ROMEO.
Madam, you have made me believe
That what I am saying now is true.

EO.
So you are, and as you are, I grant it I am at leisure.
Stay yet, I beseech you, stay yet;
I know you have got my measure of love in brief.
Therefore come, bitter exhortation, follow me.

ROMEO.
’Tis the way
To Verona streets.

ROMEO.
What proverb says, “Thou art deceiv’d,
When thou hast no love counsellor, thou art drunk;
And untimely death puts thy neighbour before thee.”
Yet those words do add up to Romeo’s vow,
Which can only be made by hearing them said aloud.
Therefore stay yet, be sober, and thou wilt find
The secret of thy unstain’d love in brief.

ROMEO.
I have a sick man, and that he is going mad,
My best friend is dead; I am fortune’s fool;
I’ll say yon true; but Romeo’s true fear cannot furnish excuse.
What if that my true love,
Which was the substance of my temper,
Shall be combin’d, and discovered
In some other madman’s abominable passion,
Which, by some strange influence of my own,
Could bestow such excess love upon myself,
That I would revolt against it, and be an Atheist.
Would this be so? That I should revolt,
Which, having learnt this art, should devise an end.

ROMEO.
Not I, methinks it were a more right conceit,
Than madmen’s wings, bent like madmen’s mandrakes,
Driving hither from the farthest east,
To soar their dismal sundering clouds,
And wreak their dismal havoc on the sea.

ROMEO.
Madam, you have made me believe
That what I am saying now is true.

ROMEO.
If the night is warm, and the air cheerful,
Why follow the birds, when they are at leisure,
When they are going out to hunt? Why dost thou look on the moon?

ROMEO.
O love, what cause didst thou think me here?

ROMEO.
By an old love’s favour. I do remember well how my father’s favour
Had


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

style1.jpg
How well I have acted in life. Partly that is my own fault, partly I love him better than myself; and partly I do wish for the pair to live as one, though that is not my wish.

There are some beauties in snowy days’—beauty that pierc’d my breast and make my cheek pale,
Some other beauties in dullness—hush, I am too bold.
Farewell, farewell.

JULIET.
Good Nurse,—Good merrily,
Madam. I am contented, and shall hence tomorrow be well.

JULIET.
’Tis the way to heaven. What a pity, I thought thou told me not to come.
Come, let me have some news, early in the morning.

JULIET.
Wilt thou interrupt me? How doth my coach? I am going with him to Montague,
to speak with him at Friar Lawrence’ cell. I am well;
He will be back in a minute.
Madam, I am very sorry that thou dost not attend me at my wedding.
I have forgot to attend you at church, and am not going to meet you there.
What can I do, so thou mayst not attend? I pray thee leave me to myself,
Your maid, or my true man, shall I come to.
I am sure thou art well, and I am sorry that I have to attend to this.
I have lost count of how many times I have felt myself interrupt’d,
I’ll say it shall be the other way.
What if, like me, you do not attend? What if, like me, you do not attend?
Henceforward I would not, but thou jealous would I should interrupt you.
Would I interrupt thee, cousin? Dear madam,
Tell me not, by a woman I know not. It is very late,
The clock is nine. What is it? Why, Nurse, is my hand so tender,
That when I press it to my face,
It shrinks to the touch. Is that so? Poor love, you have acted rashly,
And now I am distraught. I fear I must marry you now.
If so, I pray thee leave me to myself. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have some news.
I am going to Montague. Come, let me have


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

senEO.
It was my husband, Jove, that first procured the child.
This shall furnish the Bridegroom with all her necessaries.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither, cordial and not poison, come Nurse.
What should she do here? I do need some light physic.
I’ll be with thee in a minute.
Come hither,


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

collided, the car was hit.

One bullet struck the top of the head, the other struck the glove compartment, leaving behind a bloody mess of blood.

It was the same man that hit me.

This man had hit me three times already,
And hit me in the face and in my face with a club,
Staying with me all these years.

Murder, that is slander! It was my father, my mother,
My sisters and myself!
No, it was not my father, nor did it come from him!
It was a bloody conflagration, and not of joy!
My life was in peril, and I payed no worship!
Had I not, the world would have ended there.
I will not forget it.


JULIET.
Madam, where is my mother?


JULIET.
Madam, where is my mother?

JULIET.
I send my lady to ask your lady to come with me into my closet.


JULIET.
Ay me, what say’st thou?


JULIET.
Madam, where is my lady?

JULIET.
I send my lady to ask your lady to come with me into my closet.

JULIET.
By the grace of God, I have got thee here,
Father, and I beseech thee, out of patience,
Go forward, or I’ll whip thee with a sudden crack.


JULIET.
Ay me, what say’st thou?

JULIET.
I send my lady to ask your lady to come with me into my closet.

JULIET.
By the grace of God, I have got thee here,
Father, and I beseech thee, out of patience,
Go forward, or I’ll whip thee with a sudden crack.

JULIET.
It shall kill thee before thou hast satisfied me.


JULIET.
O God! Hast thou got thy hands full in this desperate attempt?
Dost thou believe in some dreadful god?
I do believe in him, and he tempt’d me to sin.

ULIET.
Ay me, what say’st thou?

JULIET.
I send my lady to ask your lady to come with me into my closet.

JULIET.
By the grace of God, I have got thee here,
Father, and I beseech thee, out of patience,
Go forward, or I’ll whip thee with a sudden crack.

JULIET.
It shall kill thee before thou hast satisfied me.

JULIET.
Ay me, what say’st thou?

JULIET.
I am not satisfied.


JULIET.
Madam, where is my mother?

JULIET.
I send my lady to ask your lady to come with me into my closet.

JULIET.
By the grace of God, I have got thee here,
Father, and I beseech thee, out of patience,
Go forward, or I’ll whip thee with a sudden crack.

JULIET.
It shall kill thee before thou hast satisfied me.

JULIET.
I am not satisfied.

JULIET.
I must go with thee, we shall die young,
Or let the devil take thy place.

JULIET.
Give me that bloody knife. I’ll take thee from thy lips.


JULIET.
Madam, where is my mother?

JULIET.
I send my lady to ask your lady to come with me into my closet.

JULIET.
By the grace of God, I have got thee here,
Father, and I beseech thee, out of patience,
Go forward, or I’ll whip thee with a sudden crack.

JULIET.
It shall kill thee before thou hast satisfied me.

JULIET.
I am not satisfied.

JULIET.
I must go with thee, we shall die young,
Or let the devil take thy place.

JULIET.
Give me that bloody knife. I’ll take thee from thy lips.

JULIET.
I will take thee.

JULIET.
I will kill thee.


JULIET.
Good pilgrim, you have made a saint’s cell,
And now


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

LabelULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Hast thou no news? Hast thou no inkling of shame yet in my breast?
Or am I delirious? Or is it worse that I wake early to behold
Tybalt slaughtering me?
Or am I pale and pale and pale again, and die young?

JULIET.
Gallop apace, my betossed life! Poor cheek! Poor thing!
Howlings, boisterous sounds, shrieks, all in all!
O God! What hadst thou to do in hell
When thou dost lure me to this groaning grave?

JULIET.
Is there no medicine in here? O most barbarous confessor,
Put this in a cup, immediately.
Poison, thou hast made me effeminate.
What if my breath is so sour, and I die of thirst?
Hath that sourness in my drink, or is it poison still hanging in the air?
Do you think I drink from a dead man’s hand,
Hath that foul smell in my cheeks, or is it poison still hanging in the air?
Do you think I have blackouts all over my body,
Or that my eyes are burning with poison, or both?

JULIET.
See thou my mangled face, pale in what is left of it?
How oddly is my body, so lightly struck,
When I am struck down by lightning, so lightly struck?
How oddly is my back, so lightly struck,
When I am struck down by a lightning-swinging wall, so lightly struck?
How oddly is my back, so lightly struck,
When I am struck down by a car, so lightly struck?
Hath that back joint so lightly struck,
That I cannot move? Is that how my back is struck,
As is my father’s bone struck? O that joint so lightly struck,

As did my father’s bone take on such a new life,
That almost all my joints break, leaving only a single bone,
Shall I not then have a new loathsome wound,
And sore within my loins as my father did within his firstborn?

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! O sweet face! O gentle serpent, hid with a dead man’s face!

JULIET.
Your loathsome mouth is as bad as rotten thy tongue,
For there is food in your lips that is worse for you to have,
If you do not spit this poison.

JULIET.
Wash the wounds with vinegar, for there is no poison in here.

JULIET.
Then please thou wash my wounds, for there is food in here.

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. Take this letter immediately.
Put this note in my hand, by my direction,
That I may immediately return to you,
Or if thou jealous do not return at once,
Then I will tear the letter away, and strew this grave with thy blood.

JULIET.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Is this how I came to steal thy breath? O thou food, therefore be not poison.
’Tis the name I bear of my enemy. Drink not more, for I will kill thee.
Come, cordial, come Nurse. Drink from my lips. I’ll to the west,
Where there are desperate vials of thy poison. Stay, and I’ll bring thee poison.
Come, cordial, come Nurse. Drink not from my lips.
I’ll be burnt alive, buried in a sepulchre.
Live, and not die, die young, amen.

JULIET.
Go, go! There is food in this hungry heap.

JULIET.
There is food, there must be more! There is no escaping! O be gone,
The doors are wide open, let me in.
Come Nurse, come Nurse, come Nurse! O there must soon be an end to this hungry stupor.

JULIET.
’Tis the way! ’Tis the way to heaven! Heaven help me, help me! I am in need!
I need you! O Nurse, help me! I am in need!
I need you! I am in need! I need you! I am in need!
I need you! I am in need! I need


===== CHECKPOINT 034 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

threadULIET.
Did thou tempt me thus?
Did not Romeo, who is my father,
Displant me thus? I beseech thee, lady, go with me into my closet.
Come, lie down and have some tea. I have some poison
inside my robes that I must use against you.
I do love Capulet, and think I have it all.
Go, tell me, who is living? O tell them. I have some poison
inside my robes that I must use against you.
I do love Capulet, and think I have it all.
Go, tell me, who is living? O tell them. I have some poison
inside my robes that I must use against you.
I do love Capulet, and think I have it all.
Go, tell me, who is living? O tell them. I have some poison
inside my robes that I must use against you.
I do love Capulet, and think I have it all.
Go, tell me, who is living? O tell them. I have some poison
inside my robes that I must use against you.
I do love Capulet, and think I have it all.
Go, tell me, who is living?

ROMEO.
What hast thou there? Shall I go with you tomorrow?

ROMEO.
O shut the door, I am near.

ROMEO.
Away to heaven help me, help me.

JULIET.
What hast thou there? Shall I go with you tomorrow?

ROMEO.
O shut the door, I am near.

ROMEO.
Away to heaven help me, help me.

JULIET.
What hast thou there? Shall I go with you tomorrow?

ROMEO.
O shut the door, I am near.

JULIET.
I have an inkling that thou art gone,
Taking with me poison that I must use
to kill thee.
I have a knife in my breast that I must use
to cut thee off.
Death, that thou art loathsome, hath sold me out.
I must be gone. Hast thou got me some inkling?

ROMEO.
No, I do not wish to lose thee. Hast thou got me some inklings?

JULIET.
Ay me! What have thou there, thou dost not come to me yet?
Come weep with me into my room,
And tell me where thou art. Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
Give me that inkling. Hast thou got me some inklings?

JULIET.
Ay me! What have thou there, thou dost not come to me yet?
Come weep with me into my room,
And tell me where thou art. Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
Give me that inkling. Hast thou got me some inklings?

JULIET.
Ay me! What have thou there, thou dost not come to me yet?
Come weep with me into my room,
And tell me where thou art. Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
Give me that inkling. Hast thou got me some inklings?

JULIET.

Ay me! What have thou there, thou dost not come to me yet?
Come weep with me into my room,
And tell me where thou art. Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
Give me that inkling. Hast thou got me some inklings?

JULIET.
I have some inklings!

JULIET.
I have some inklings!

JULIET.
Thou talk’st of nothing.

ULIET.
What hast thou there, thou dost not come to me yet?
Come weep with me into my room,
And tell me where thou art. Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
Give me that inkling. Hast thou got me some inklings?

JULIET.
I have some inklings!

JULIET.
I have some inklings!

JULIET.
What hast thou there, thou dost not come to me yet?
Come weep with me into my room,
And tell me where thou art. Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
Give me that inkling. Hast thou


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

SolidULA.
What joy joy did my bosom contract when thou hast been rul’d by my lady?
Arise, and comfort my poor confessor,
That in this most holy Sacrament our dear lord be absolved
From all these affray’d affray’s.
Henceforward I will endeavor to remain as confessor
To the widow whose name is offended;
And in this I commend thee to high honour.

JULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise?
Feather’d with the envious smells of the night,
Lest in thy splendour be dishonour’d, ne’er call’d this palace palaces,
Let us now be set free.
This is the Mantua, and all this day a feasting spirit
Lifts the heavens above us with wondrous beauty.
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of man in this gorgeous palace?
Was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound? Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET.
O Fortune! Hast thou not a word of joy?
Did ever dragon keep so soft a cave?
Or was ever book containing so much noise
So fairly bound?

JULIET


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

traditionally-accustomed gear. At any rate, he is an honourable man, a true gentleman, and bestower than ever before in that gentlemanly company.”

So complimented were they with their affray.

JULIET.
Ay me, what further commission doth this displeas’d debt engross’d in my head?

JULIET.
Is it but so? I fear not; for I have need of many necessaries.
My mind rest’d in this, and full of rest’d rest is my purpose.
Madam, if this business affords no satisfaction, quit it; and be gone, and I thee there presently.
Thou know’st me both here and abroad, both here in my lady’s bed and abroad,
Do thou but call me back again, and see what effect this shall have.
What shall I there be but noise and vexation?
What shall I there be but vexation and love teach me?
I wonder at this haste, that I should here be here all alone,
With no one else to bear the affections I now take from thee,
Both here and abroad? And why, therefore, why hast thou hither?
Why hast thou hither? Partly because of the manner in which I be gone,
And partly to get thee hence. But why I return hither, that thou mayst not remain at home,
To be here alone with these unsavoury characters?
Because thou ne’er consent to these so contrary ends.
Therefore hence, be gone, and be gone, and find my husband and father.
If there be any disorder, be gone at once.
By heaven I love thee better than myself; for I come hither arm’d against myself.
If this be a rage, contend not with me now; for I long to be attacked.
Stay not, be gone, for I come hither arm’d against myself.
Whate’er thou hear’st or seest, stand still, and do not run away.
Be gone, take the man I have hired tomorrow,
And bring him hither in such haste that I may enquire into his whereabouts.
Why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend into this bed of death,
To encounter thee here today? Partly to behold what thou hast done,
And partly to provoke thee hither. But why I descend


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

maize, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the Ethiopians, and the


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

aundULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me into my room, and teach me how to lose a
Wash.
Mister, I am met with a metallurgist!
Shall I speak ill of him that is thy nurse?
Is there a man in heaven whose name is Montague that
Wash the like-stained waste of thy time
In this tedious business? O, that whose name
I call a ghost, that would wreak the like
Tybalt upon a pitch high mountain topography,
Retain his place of honour as a saint,
And in this manner would I extricate
A highway to Mantua. O, that whose name
I worship
Would descend from the heavens and spit on the earth.
Ah, villain, tempt not me, for I have already
Maintained my state by this long journey.
Courage, madam, speak; for I long to kill thee.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! For shame, slander, and oppression
Came upon my head by thy slander.
Thou art not conquer’d. Villain account’d, not coz
With rapier’s who perjured themselves
In title-dealing lawsuits. O, that who
Contain’d such valuables
As are grown in this mansion,
Hath more cunning to prey on my modesty
Than those that have more cunning to use my body
For their own advantage. Villain, take up the sword.
Withdraw it, and when thou hast slain
The just and sufficient pretext for my defence,
Be gone, for I will not return to thee.
This shall be my confession. Take it, and tell me, madam,
What’s here? The mangled remains of an enemy’s dead
Laws? The like! Howlings, be brief.
As for this bed of death, I have no food;
Things that I should have; nain none. Where is my father?
Where is my mother? What’s here? And is she not dead?
The maw? O, that dost torment me thus!
Madam, what’s here? The spirit that made thee despair
Upon this such a needy subject
Is gone, leaving me to think it all over.
Put not another word of loathsome terror
Upon my head. These last are gone.
These last are gone. Get thee hence, madam;
There is darkness in the wings; look thou there.
The mask’s of charmers hangs heavy upon my head
This instant, and every where in the dark
Is a bloody mess. The mask’s remaining are light;
My whole being is in darkness.
O, how I doth my being perceived!
Is my being perceived? O, how doth my being perceived?
O, how doth my being perceived?
O, how doth my being perceived?
O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being perceived?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?

O, how doth my being seen?


===== CHECKPOINT 035 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

amation. And even now, though I think my eyesight is poor, yet do swear by it brightens them brighten with every kiss.
Mercutio’s earsight is excellent, and Placenta excellent. Mine, too, is poor: she speaks too little, yet I do believe her.
O, I see how she fares in love.
She speaks sweetly of the fair Prince’s bliss, yet she’s not much advanced in beauty.
Thou know’st my mother well. Poor, she speaks ill of me.
O, she speaks sweetly of men’s amorous delights, yet she’s not much advanced in beauty.
O, she speaks of love as a poison, yet not a mistress.
O, she speaks with aplomb of sweet conceit, yet not a sound mistress.
O, she speaks with unaccustom’d air, yet shows no beauty.
She speaks in harsh and lath’d language, yet speaks with aplomb’d air.
Again, good Nurse, do what I can to help her.
She speaks with such skill in her that she shall make the cutest trumpet in heaven.
I will not forget her. Let’s go.
That merry villain off, that is enough; the hurt cannot be much.
Peace, peace, peace. Get thee hence.
Madam, away thou day. I see that Romeo is gone.
What said my man, when my betossed soul saw him gone?
Thou hast vex’d me that thou art yet come hither.
I should have slain Romeo when thou didst send me? Hast thou still bid my soul farewell?
O, what more favour can I do to thee here than by flattering him that is gone?
Let me peruse this face.
Blister’d be thy tongue, for thou art not well.
I beseech thy health, noble mother, to come hither.
Father, if thou jealous bid my hand rest on thine eye,
I will tear thee joint by joint, till thou teach my ladyship patience.
Give me strength, and when thou teachest me to tremble,
Thou desperate pilot, now at once sink thy teeth into the bier,
And hire a new men’tor.
Hood my tears with thy rapier; when thou art near,
Give me cordial deliverance, and when thou comest,
Come hither, professional escort, herald of my man!
Stay, be trusty, and I’ll go with thee into city;
And fetch my banished kinsman, in to-morrow morning
Whilst I enjoin thee to come forward and bid my man depart,
Henceforward I will faithfully serve thee until the time
That my true knight return to take his last farewell.
So pardon me, good sir, and have this body,
Upon which I’ll embalm my conqueror’s doom,
With a loud and deadly trumpet sound the body’s doom, urging thee hither,
Beginning now with a loud trumpet sound,
And throughout the whole earth shake with a boundless sound,
The place encompassing the world shall be like that in heaven,
For in a minute there shall be many masses,
And upon this earth an immense heap of smoke
Shall be the place where Tahupo abandons his folks,
And all this on top of an unpleasing mound
Where idolatry and perverted rites
Spread themselves throughout the entire face of the earth.
Here’s to my love! ’Tut! ’Tut! ’Haply some poison yet hangs on thy lips,
Shall kill it in large quantities, and when it is no longer there,
With great fiery pomegranate seeds rush forth from thy lips,
That in a minute poison beying itself upon the face
Of all the world’s fairs. Eyes, look your last. ‘O be gone, madam;
For a short time there is slaughter in the streets,
More than meet and greets the looking-glass.
Come, unsavoury guide, come, unsavoury guide, come, unsavoury guide,
Tell my mangled and diseased lord and father, get thee hither, and bid my man depart,
Soon I’ll bring him roaring back to life, clean and fast.
There, there, there, there, there, there! Be not a word of fear, be not a word!
All this day my mangled and diseased lord and father
Has Purvis’d his foul messengers, all over the place,
From all sides, all over the world, urging thee hither,


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

captchaI wish more of those that I know that are as young as myself could be. Mine may depend, for their injur- ance, on their attain’d. Both my parents are of noble birth, and both I and my father were born into a prosperous household. Both my fortunes depend upon this, and my happiness depend upon the consequence. O, I must depend. But if my happiness be so depend’d, and my father’s fortunes depend upon this, then lie not many smooth tributaries. That, therefore, may I be minut’d, and never prosperous. Both these extremes are too heavy for comfort, and too much for the purpose. Therefore, therefore, be gone. But if my joy prove more wanton than bearable, and my fear more unrestrained, and my comfort less than full of satisfaction, and that my happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more vex’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. And if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. And if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. And if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. And if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend’d but upon the fear, then behold, I long to die. But if my joy prove more injur’d than the hope I now seem to have, and that happiness depend�


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Benefit.
O thou such a wretch!
I will tear thee joint by joint,
And cut thee joint by joint,
And then join me in a triumphant leap,
And soar like a drunkard,
With all the might of a club!
Henceforward I am proof against all idolatry.
Therefore may I not crown thee,
As an enemy to thee; for I am a man of faith,
And verily I have prove
That thou my love is not counterfeit;
For I am a man of faith and verily
Be not a Capulet. O prove me not,
For I have counterfeit’d merchandise.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou prove me not, love? Then may I no longer be cannon’d.

ROMEO.
Nay, good goose, grant me strength,
And with that strength I’ll help you. Thus may I use thee.

ROMEO.
Thou knowest my lodging, and all my merchandise.

ROMEO.
Farewell, gentleman; for I have hire’d the men to look after thee.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, give this trunk to my mistress.
Hold, come hither, Nurse,
Who, being enpierced, is urging thee hither.

ROMEO.
I come to thee cordial in cordial humour,
Being well nourished, yet ill adapted,
I come hither arm’d in arm’d against myself,
To wit, Jane’s wit, and Romeo’s. Let me therefore go.
Come, cordial, come, all this men;
Put these poor ropes up, and when I shall be come,
Come bound me, by holy John’s bound,
To tear thee joint by joint,
And cut thee joint by joint,
And then soar like a drunkard,
With all the might of a club!
Henceforward I am proof against all idolatry.
Therefore may I not crown thee,
As an enemy to thee; for I am a man of faith,
And verily I have prove
That thou my love is not counterfeit;
For I am a man of faith and verily
Be not a Capulet. O prove me not,
For I have counterfeit’d merchandise.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou prove me not, love? Then may I no longer be cannon’d.

ROMEO.
Nay, good goose, grant me strength,
And with that strength I’ll help you. Thus may I use thee.

ROMEO.
Farewell, gentleman; for I have hire’d the men to look after thee.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, give this trunk to my mistress.
Hold, come hither, Nurse,
Who, being enpierced, is urging thee hither.

ROMEO.
I come to thee cordial in cordial humour,
Being well nourished, yet ill adapted,
I come hither arm’d in arm’d against myself,
To wit, Jane’s wit, and Romeo’s. Let me therefore go.
Come, cordial, come, all this men;
Put these poor ropes up, and when I shall be come,
Come bound me, by holy John’s bound,
To tear thee joint by joint,
And cut thee joint by joint,
And then soar like a drunkard,
With all the might of a club!
Henceforward I am proof against all idolatry.
Therefore may I not crown thee,
As an enemy to thee; for I am a man of faith,
And verily I have prove
That thou my love is not counterfeit;
For I am a man of faith and verily
Be not a Capulet. O prove me not,
For I have counterfeit’d merchandise.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou prove me not, love? Then may I no longer be cannon’d.

ROMEO.
Nay, good goose, grant me strength,
And with that strength I’ll help you. Thus may I use thee.

ROMEO.
Farewell, gentleman; for I have hire’d the men to look after thee.

ROMEO.
Good Mercutio, give this trunk to my mistress.
Hold, come hither, Nurse,
Who, being enpierced, is urging thee hither.

ROMEO.
I come to thee cordial in cordial humour,
Being well nourished, yet ill adapted,
I come hither arm’d in arm’d against myself,
To


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Minneapolis. So I went and bought some lodging. But not wanting thence, I went to Friar Montague and promised him I would come and see him. So I did; and there I found him—
Father, what news? What hast thou there? What hast thou there? Did I steal thy book? I beseech thee, madam, tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of anything. Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of anything. ’Tis but the wind, and not the moon, that blows the trumpet
To greet thee here tonight. O, how I love thy company! And how art thou Romeo’s wife? I wonder at thy beauty. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy countenance. I wonder at thy lean leanness. I wonder at thy pale mind. I wonder at thy pale cheek. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale cheek. I wonder at thy pale cheek. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale cheek. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder at thy pale face. I wonder


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

assorted_divines.txt
I know he is dead
But he made a vow
To keep him company. I do not know where.
Dost thou, ne’er look upon him?
Or is he still here?’s half-cover’d up in his shroud?
Some angelical messenger from heaven
Shall be with him in this place for a minute,
Or may he be kept as a closet at night
Where all my forgotten and forgotten and forgotten and forgotten
Come to behold me here every day in silence
For those that are gone.
O, if they knew where I am, they might come to see me.

But wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?

He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.

Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.
If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.
Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.
Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.
Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.
Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.
Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If he were, I would tear his hair and bury him in a grave.
Wherefore, madam, do you think I am gone?
If I am gone, where is my Romeo?

Dost thou not think I am gone?

Some dreadful ghost from the wings of night
Still haunts the black earth,
That creeps ever after the desperate countenance of my lady!
Where is my Romeo?
He’s in heaven, he’s there. O, he is not me.

If


===== CHECKPOINT 036 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Proposition,
He that is slain shall not be save’d.

JULIET.
O, break, I am breath’d,
My life and my health are depend’d,
I therefore contract a feasting state,
With purg’d food and drink,
Things which the Friar’s Banishment hath mak’d,
That in my state of health,
I’ll be fir’d, but by my life I’ll stay.

ROMEO.
But if thou wilt not, marry Juliet,
And get a husband, and then be gone,
Then by heaven I commend thee, I pray thee, bid me lurk,
And not marry Paris.

JULIET.
Go hence, and be gone, for I bid thee go,
Being bid, I must go uncharm’d.

ROMEO.
I would I were thy bosom but empty.

JULIET.
Give me strength, and I’ll wed,
Being woo’d, that will give strength to shake thee.
Give me light, and weaklings, and strongmen,
And good Nurse, bring hither hither Juliet.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, what devil art thou that dost torment me
In this closet?

EO.
I would I were thy bosom but empty.

JULIET.
Give me strength, and I’ll wed,
Being woo’d, that will give strength to shake thee.
Give me light, and weaklings, and strongmen,
And good Nurse, bring hither Juliet.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, what devil art thou that dost torment me
In this closet?

JULIET.
Out! Let me die, out of spite!
I have a faint poison in my breast,
Shall I not be purg’d and left to my fate?

ROMEO.
Nurse, I am sorry that you see my face.

EO.
Nurse, I am sorry that you see my face.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue, for that was thy bid.

ROMEO.
Blister’d be thy tongue, for that was thy bid.

ROMEO.
Now, spit thy blood, and when thou hast spit it back,
Hold fast to my will, Verify that I bear true love,
And kill the vengeful spirit that hath torment’d me.

JULIET.
Give me strength, and I’ll wed,
Being woo’d, that will give strength to shake thee.
Give me light, and weaklings, and strongmen,
And good Nurse, bring hither Juliet.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, what devil art thou that dost torment me
In this closet?

JULIET.
Out! Let me die, out of spite!
I have a faint poison in my breast,
Shall I not be purg’d and left to my fate?

ROMEO.
Nurse, I am sorry that you see my face.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue, for that was thy bid.

ROMEO.
Now, spit thy blood, and when thou hast spit it back,
Hold fast to my will, Verify that I bear true love,
And kill the vengeful spirit that hath torment’d me.

JULIET.
Give me strength, and I’ll wed,
Being woo’d, that will give strength to shake thee.
Give me light, and weaklings, and strongmen,
And good Nurse, bring hither Juliet.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet?

JULIET.
O God! O Nurse, what devil art thou that dost torment me
In this closet?

JULIET.
Out! Let me die, out of spite!
I have a faint poison in my breast,
Shall I not be purg’d and left to my fate?

ROMEO.
Nurse, I am sorry that you see my face.

JULIET.
Shall I not pray thee


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

toes?


Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?


Said I to my lord and father,


“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


What of it, madam? That what you said was true?


That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


Said I to my lord and father,

“What of that, madam? That what you said was true?


And so did I, all slain, with a rapier.


JULIET.
Sweet, so sudden came the sweet news.


JULIET.
Sweet, so sudden came the sweet news.

JULIET.
What joyful news were yonder than joys?


JULIET.
Three o’clock in the morning.


JULIET.
Three o’clock in the morning.

JULIET.
A sudden joyous exposition.


JULIET.
Nurse!—What news?

ULIET.
A sudden joyous exposition.

JULIET.
What news?

JULIET.
I saw the Prince’s ghost;

ULIET.
Nurse!—What news?

JULIET.
I saw the Prince’s ghost;

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

ULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

ULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

JULIET.
A muffled shriek came from within my breast,
Like a broken heart,
Swollen with grief within,—
Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back.

ULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

JULIET.
A muffled shriek came from within my breast,
Like a broken heart,
Swollen with grief within,—
Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back.

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

JULIET.
A muffled shriek came from within my breast,
Like a broken heart,
Swollen with grief within,—
Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back.

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

JULIET.
A muffled shriek came from within my breast,
Like a broken heart,
Swollen with grief within,—
Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back.

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

JULIET.
A muffled shriek came from within my breast,
Like a broken heart,
Swollen with grief within,—
Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back.

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

JULIET.
Then came the Nurse,
And she found me dead,—

JULIET.
A muffled shriek came from within


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

operationsULA.
The gentleman’s kinsman is come and hath taileth me
Unto my lodging, where I shall lie
With black mantle over my head till strange love,
Soon to burst forth in my breast,
Whiter than lead, faster than fire,
Lest in a minute his poison make me die.

JULIET.
This man art not here to torment me.
This town is but an hour’s journey
From here to there in a dream.
My life is like a roaring curtain,
Where love’s smoke rises and purifies the air.
My coz, my bank account,
My bank statements, all this is in my head!
My eyes are like streaks in a sheet,
As streaks in a book;
My conduct is like a dagger in a rapier’s lap;
My thoughts like rushes of lead;
My conduct is like a lightning dancing breast;
My coz, my bank accounts, all this is
in my head!

JULIET.
Come hither, Nurse, come hither.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou, Friar?

ROMEO.
What sin is that which, when thou hast heard the tongue speak,
Revel thy name before thou:
Thou blazon’d with sin, yet hath not slain it.
Sin affords some comfort to those that are afflicted,
And comfort’s dispense pardon to those that are slain.
But wherefore, villain, didst thou poison the life
Of a friend, whom thou counselled
To slay with a deadly shaft?
Or was thy tongue but drunk with grief?
Or was thy cunning but too quickly won?
Or were thy eyes but sick from the grief?
Or were they some other cause of thy grief?
Or was thy resolution noble, but with a face full of hate?
Or was’t thy resolution harsh, but detestable?

ROMEO.
Thou wilt answer that. But what of this?

ULA.
The gentleman’s kinsman is come and hath taileth me
Unto my lodging, where I shall lie
With black mantle over my head till strange love,
Soon to burst forth in my breast,
Whiter than lead, faster than fire,
Lest in a minute his poison make me die.

JULIET.
This man art not here to torment me.
This town is but an hour’s journey
From here to there in a dream.
My life is like a roaring curtain,
Where love’s smoke rises and purifies the air.
My coz, my bank account,
My bank statements, all this is in my head!
My eyes are like streaks in a sheet,
As streaks in a book;
My conduct is like a dagger in a rapier’s lap;
My thoughts like rushes of lead;
My conduct is like a lightning dancing breast;
My coz, my bank accounts, all this is
in my head!

JULIET.
Come hither, Nurse, come hither.

ROMEO.
What say’st thou, Friar?

ROMEO.
What sin is that which, when thou hast heard the tongue speak,
Revel thy name before thou:
Thou blazon’d with sin, yet hath not slain it.
Sin affords some comfort to those that are afflicted,
And comfort’s dispense pardon to those that are slain.
But wherefore, villain, didst thou poison the life
Of a friend, whom thou counselled
To slay with a deadly shaft?
Or was thy tongue but drunk with grief?
Or was thy resolution noble, but with a face full of hate?
Or was thy resolution harsh, but detestable?

ROMEO.
Thou wilt answer that. But what of this?

JULIET.
O God! Didst thou not send the angel to tempt thee?
Was thy father but a beast,
That tempt’d thee thus? Hast thou no god to tempt?
Why dost thou tempt me?

ULA.
This man art not here to torment me.
This town is but an hour’s journey
From here to there in a dream.
My life is like a roaring curtain,
Where love’s smoke rises and purifies the air.
My coz, my bank account,
My bank statements, all this is in my head!
My eyes are like streaks in a sheet,
As streaks in a book;
My conduct is like a dagger in a rapier’s lap;
My


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Cors2:
Well done, knight. Tybalt, farewell. I beseech you, morrow, all my kinsmen, to quit thy pains and to go with me into thine own closet, for this is the man I shall serve as lord and all my men shall serve as his mistresses.
Hast thou not overheard that I am a knight?
O, by thy grace, I beseech thee, my kinsmen, to quit thy pains and to go with me into thine own closet, for this is the man I shall serve as lord and all my men shall serve as his mistresses.
Hast thou not overheard that I am a knight?
Is thy mouth full of falsehood? Then be not a wringinginging heart, for I am an honest man,
And therefore thou canst give no excuse.

O, if I may trust a word, which my deceit proves,
It is but a little while since I was a maid;
And yet thou canst not prove me a lie.

ULIET.
Well done, knight. Tybalt, farewell. I beseech you, my kinsmen, to quit thy pains and to go with me into thine own closet, for this is the man I shall serve as lord and all my men shall serve as his mistresses.
Hast thou not overheard that I am a knight?
Is thy mouth full of falsehood? Then be not a wringinging heart, for I am an honest man,
And therefore thou canst not excuse.
O, if I may trust a word, which my deceit proves,
It is but a little while since I was a maid;
And yet thou canst not prove me a lie.

JULIET.
Indeed I am not so much lad as a mouse;
And yet a thousand times I am satisfied;
For I have joy in seeing thee satisfied;
But fear not, love, that thou art satisfied.
I should have found my Prince now
Else would I had slain him with a thousand swords.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ULIET.
Indeed I am not so much lad as a mouse;
And yet a thousand times I am satisfied;
For I have joy in seeing thee satisfied;
But fear not, love, that thou art satisfied.
I should have found my Prince now
Else would I had slain him with a thousand swords.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

JULIET.
O God! What man art thou thus envious?
What tongue shall smooth thy name,
Else smooth thy rapier?

ULIET.
Indeed I am not so much lad as a mouse;
And yet a thousand times I am satisfied;
For I have joy in seeing thee satisfied;
But fear not, love, that thou art satisfied.
I should have found my Prince now
Else would I had slain him with a thousand swords.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

JULIET.
O God! What man art thou thus envious?
What tongue shall smooth thy name,
Else smooth thy rapier?

JULIET.
Tush, thou art deceiv’d. O Lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name?

JULIET.
A thousand times, a thousand times.

ULIET.
O God! What man art thou thus envious?
What tongue shall smooth thy name,
Else smooth thy rapier?

JULIET.
A thousand times, a thousand times.

JULIET.
Wilt thou provoke me, or provoke me from behind?

JULIET.
Ay, what tongue shall smooth thy name?

ULIET.
A thousand times, a thousand times.

JULIET.
O God! What man art thou thus envious?
What tongue shall smooth thy name,
Else smooth thy rapier?

JULIET.
A thousand times, a thousand times.

JULIET.
O God! What man art thou thus envious?


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

tissULIET.
Thou knowest the date of the marriage of my love to Paris.
But what of that? How strange must it be, when the blessed Cupid hath
Thou there to woo?
For she is not yet married. Therefore, if she be,
It is not to me.

JULIET.
It is not to me.

JULIET.
It is not to thee.

JULIET.
It is not to thee.

JULIET.
Your love is like a ring,—A precious ring, in thy hand,—
Doth that hand belong to mine, which is mine,
And yet mine is not mine?
Or would thou but kiss my love?

JULIET.
Give me thy hand,
My face,
And I’ll follow thee.

JULIET.
It is not mine.

JULIET.
’Tis not thou hers.

ULIET.
It is not to thee.

JULIET.
Your love is like a ring,—A precious ring, in thy hand,—
Doth that hand belong to mine,
And yet mine is not mine?
Or would thou but kiss my love?

JULIET.
Give me thy hand,
My face,
And I’ll follow thee.

JULIET.
It is not mine.

JULIET.
’Tis not thou hers.

JULIET.
And that hand that thou wast struck with
Upon the breast of Saint Peter,
Shall but have scars that make thee blush
Else wouldst thou kiss it, for Saint Peter’s is
A holy holy cross.
What a bliss is this that I feel
Thou hast there forst in thy palm,
Chequering the ere he that hath struck
A holy cross. Mine is but a tender kiss,
And as sweet a note as mine own breath
Is a note struck out by Saint Peter’s holy breath.

JULIET.
O sweet breath, touch that.

JULIET.
Give me, my hand.

ULIET.
’Tis not thou hers.

JULIET.
And that hand that thou wast struck with
Upon the breast of Saint Peter,
Shall but have scars that make thee blush
Else wouldst thou kiss it, for Saint Peter’s is
A holy cross.
What a bliss is this that I feel
Thou hast there forst in thy palm,
Chequering the ere he that hath struck
A holy cross. Mine is but a tender kiss,
And as sweet a note as mine own breath
Is a note struck out by Saint Peter’s holy breath.

JULIET.
O sweet breath, touch that.

JULIET.
Give me, my hand.

JULIET.
What hand art thou that uses that hand?

JULIET.
My palm?

ULIET.
’Tis not thou hers.

JULIET.
And that hand that thou wast struck with
Upon the breast of Saint Peter,
Shall but have scars that make thee blush
Else wouldst thou kiss it, for Saint Peter’s is
A holy cross.
What a bliss is this that I feel
Thou hast there forst in thy palm,
Chequering the ere he that hath struck
A holy cross. Mine is but a tender kiss,
And as sweet a note as mine own breath
Is a note struck out by Saint Peter’s holy breath.

JULIET.
O sweet breath, touch that.

JULIET.
Give me, my hand.

JULIET.
What hand art thou that uses that hand?

JULIET.
My palm?

JULIET.
My palm is fine.

JULIET.
Hath that palm?

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To speak a vowel?

ULIET.
My palm?

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To speak a vowel?

JULIET.
Thou knowest my limits, and mine are infinite.

JULIET.
This is thy comfort, my dear friend.

ULIET.
’Tis not thy comfort, my dear friend.

JULIET.
O Romeo, Romeo,


===== CHECKPOINT 037 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

roxJULIET.
O Fortune, which name doth afford,
As well to a mansion as to a town?
Beautiful heavens, temperance, temperance,
Why look’st thou here, poor meteor? Yet that villain blush’d,
When Fortune’s heralds were many,
He made the earth tremble with joy,
And that joyful month doth depend
On that dismal state of mind.
But Fortune’s heralds stay long;
And all these days are spent in heaven
Being the sun upon the level of the earth,
Ne’er look on that rich region
For that precious starry region of awareness
Still shows no wearisome pale,
And in all this is Capulet’s herald—
O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?
O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his days
Upon earth than with a press of hands?

O nature, what more favour could I do
To engrossing conduct his


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

abblingULIET.
Is the Prince so mean,
That even to blush’d, flattering of a lady,
Lovers temper, and not flattering her,
Doth dishonour her by making her blush so.

JULIET.
What lady art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night,
So stumblest in night, and thus is she kept
So stumblest in dark?

JULIET.
Well, Nurse, what villain tempt’d me to thine eye
So stumblest in night
When she lives?

JULIET.
The Prince’s ghostly mask is on my cheek,
Not mine own. It is the frowning eye
Of an unaccustom’d gentleman.
Murder’d not be rash, for that eye
Is fair villain, and her ghostly reverse
Transparent proof of sin.
Ah, poor eye, how soft is the frowning frown
When a man’s ghostly mask’s a frown
That is as soft as a rose’s leaf.

JULIET.
Ay me, sad hours seem long. O sweet Prince,
Thy sorrows tell no tale. Mine are sad words,
But mine are sweet; so sweet to me,
That I will tear the paper and sing it happy.

JULIET.
O, so sweet is the way thou gav’st me,
Driving me to tears all night.

JULIET.
I would I were thy tongue;
Sweet like thy breath, so soft is the search
Of a lost tongue lost in search of new sounds.

ULIET.
Is the Prince so mean,
That even to blush’d, flattering of a lady,
Lovers temper, and not flattering her,
Doth dishonour her by making her blush so.

JULIET.
What lady art thou that, thus bescreen’d in night,
So stumblest in night, and thus is she kept
So stumblest in dark?

JULIET.
Well, Nurse, what villain tempt’d me to thine eye
So stumblest in night
When she lives?

JULIET.
The Prince’s ghostly mask is on my cheek,
Not mine own. It is the frowning eye
Of an unaccustom’d gentleman.
Murder’d not be rash, for that eye
Is fair villain, and her ghostly reverse
Transparent proof of sin.
Ah, poor eye, how soft is the frowning frown
When a man’s ghostly mask’s a frown
That is as soft as a rose’s leaf.

JULIET.
Ay me, sad hours seem long. O sweet Prince,
Thy sorrows tell no tale. Mine are sad words,
But mine are sweet; so sweet to me,
That I will tear the paper and sing it happy.

JULIET.
O, so sweet is the way thou gav’st me,
Driving me to tears all night.

JULIET.
I would I were thy tongue;
Sweet like thy breath, so soft is the search
Of a lost tongue lost in search of new sounds.

JULIET.
There are stars in heaven
And all mortals know them but look on
As if they were some other star.
I should like to think those stars in heaven
Had such a face, like mine,
That they might read my name,
And call me by that name.
I should like to think those stars in heaven
Had such a face, like mine,
That they might read my name,
And call me by that name.

JULIET.
That’s not Romeo, it is the woman.

ULIET.
O, so sweet is the way thou gav’st me,
Driving me to tears all night.

JULIET.
I would I were thy tongue;
Sweet like thy breath, so soft is the search
Of a lost tongue lost in search of new sounds.

JULIET.
There are stars in heaven
And all mortals know them but look on
As if they were some other star.
I should like to think those stars in heaven
Had such a face, like mine,
That they might read my name,
And call me by that name.

JULIET.
That’s not Romeo, it is the woman.

JULIET.
O my love


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

Broadtoberfest was, in my mind, the festival of the holy Friar, and not the festival of the damned.
I am a devout Friar; I minister to the Friar that attends.
But what of that?
I do remember well that my Friar ’s name is Verona, and that he ’s buried with me.
My grave is ere my Friar’s name is burnt out,
to have the ghostly honour of his name mangled again
is a sin.
Did I forget that I was a devout Friar?
Or that my Friar did not attend?
Or that he did not attend at all?
Either way, I will answer these and other such questions you may have,
at your leisure.

JULIET.
Then, madam, what news? What of that?
A Friar ’s death ’s sin is murder, and not a protest made in faith
in the name of another.
Farewell, be trusty, farewell, and farewell,
Lucio.

ROMEO.
How is it with Valentine’s grave?
Lucio, can I go in to see him tomorrow?

ROMEO.
No, I should like to go in, first.
Is he there?

ROMEO.
What says he of my lodging?

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, he’s rude.
If he be gone, he’ll be behind some sort of post,
Some sort of conveyance from one end to the other,
Which is what we call a churchyard.
Or, if thou wilt excuse me, we shall chide thee,
And say thou know’st who I am:

ROMEO.
Well, what says he of my lodging?

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, he’s rude.
If he be gone, he’ll be behind some sort of post,
Some sort of conveyance from one end to the other,
Which is what we call a churchyard.
Or, if thou wilt excuse me, we shall chide thee,
And say thou know’st who I am:

ROMEO.
Well, what says he of my lodging?

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, he’s rude.
If he be gone, he’ll be behind some sort of post,
Some sort of conveyance from one end to the other,
Which is what we call a churchyard.
Or, if thou wilt excuse me, we shall chide thee,
And say thou know’st who I am:

ROMEO.
Well, what says he of my lodging?

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, he’s rude.
If he be gone, he’ll be behind some sort of post,
Some sort of conveyance from one end to the other,
Which is what we call a churchyard.
Or, if thou wilt excuse me, we shall chide thee,
And say thou know’st who I am:

ROMEO.
Well, what says he of my lodging?

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, he’s rude.
If he be gone, he’ll be behind some sort of post,
Some sort of conveyance from one end to the other,
Which is what we call a churchyard.
Or, if thou wilt excuse me, we shall chide thee,
And say thou know’st who I am:

ROMEO.
Well, what says he of my lodging?

ROMEO.
Well, good Nurse, he’s rude.
If he be gone, he’ll be behind some sort of post,
Some sort of conveyance from one end to the other,
Which is what we call a churchyard.
Or, if thou wilt excuse me, we shall chide thee,
And say thou know’st who I am:

ROMEO.
Is it with his that Romeo affords such burial?

ROMEO.
It seems to me he lives, that Romeo should have kept him,
Yet he dies young, and Romeo’s love is as strong a poison as that
Of Capulet’s grave.
As the Capulet that Romeo exhales, so the voice of his death
Lies like an unmade grave.
How is that with Romeo?
By some strange noise he


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

heavily in love with his mistress.
This love, the more I shall practise to live by her behests,
The more shall my joy prove, the more honourable it is,
For she is my true love, and my true love is the light of day,
With all my imaginings, all my loving thoughts,
With yonder tips of my wings, I soar.

My soul hangs upon her loving kisses, and that dear breath that shrinks
To hear her moans return to greet her.
Ah me, my Juliet! Such a sweet sound I feel to chide her,
O dear Nurse, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy breath
Shall stain thy name with blood? O sweet Juliet,
Thy breath is quick; thy name is quick.
Cheers, dear Nurse.

JULIET.
Good man, thou art such a woe. Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
By yonder god I never knew thou dost love her.

JULIET.
I met her the other day
Where she spent the night with so many happy nieces.
So sweet, so sweet, I could swear she had.
Ah me, dear Nurse! Such an ungrateful bird.
Dost thou not love her more?

JULIET.
Ay, Nurse.

JULIET


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

“(EO.
That gentleman’s soul
Is partly his, partly his conduct.—JULIET.
Some gentleman told me that Juliet should not stay long in my bed,
But would rather stay than move in.

ROMEO.
But she could not, and would not stay.

ROMEO.
Then she hath wings; and softens those that fly.

ROMEO.
I’ll look on that wing to my dear mistress’s face,
And look on hers to mine, too;
And that lovely night’s brow bears scars of night
As luster as those on her cheek,
Which when she dies,
Feels as sweet in the touch of her cheek as in
A rich, long-lost love ring.

ROMEO.
Again in dreamy phrase, and Romeo is banished.

ROMEO.
It is a wise fortune indeed!
Farewell, good Nurse, and farewell.

ROMEO.
That last is true.

EO.
And she could not, and would not stay.

ROMEO.
Then she hath wings; and softens those that fly.

ROMEO.
I’ll look on that wing to my dear mistress’s face,
And look on hers to mine, too;
And that lovely night’s brow bears scars of night
As luster as those on her cheek,
Which when she dies,
Feels as sweet in the touch of her cheek as in
A rich, long-lost love ring.

ROMEO.
Again in dreamy phrase, and Romeo is banished.

ROMEO.
It is a wise fortune indeed!
Farewell, good Nurse, and farewell.

ROMEO.
That last is true.

ROMEO.
My knees are almost full, yet I still feel good,
This is the end of an adventure.

EO.
It is a wise fortune indeed!
Farewell, good Nurse, and farewell.

ROMEO.
That last is true.

ROMEO.
My knees are almost full, yet I still feel good,
This is the end of an adventure.

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good Nurse; but one word bad’d,
’Tis not enough to make you come to me,
Good Nurse, I am sorry you have to stay.

ROMEO.
Not I, no matter.

EO.
Again in dreamy phrase, and Romeo is banished.

ROMEO.
It is a wise fortune indeed!
Farewell, good Nurse, and farewell.

ROMEO.
That last is true.

ROMEO.
My knees are almost full, yet I still feel good,
This is the end of an adventure.

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good Nurse; but one word bad’d,
’Tis not enough to make you come to me,
Good Nurse, I am sorry you have to stay.

ROMEO.
Not I, no matter.

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good Nurse; but one word bad’d,
’Tis not enough to make you come to me,
Good Nurse, I am sorry you have to stay.

ROMEO.
Not I, no matter.

ROMEO.
Now move, Nurse; the clock is nine,
The Nurse is at nine, and Lawrence is gone.

ROMEO.
What, is that the Nurse?

EO.
Now move, Nurse; the clock is nine,
The Nurse is at nine, and Lawrence is gone.

ROMEO.
What, is that the Nurse?

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good Nurse; but one word bad’d,
’Tis not enough to make you come to me,
Good Nurse, I am sorry you have to stay.

ROMEO.
Not I, no matter.

ROMEO.
Now move, Nurse; the clock is nine,
The Nurse is at nine, and Lawrence is gone.

ROMEO.
What, is that the Nurse?

ROMEO.
Good morrow, good Nurse; but one word bad’d,
’Tis not enough to make you come to me,
Good Nurse, I am sorry you have to stay.

ROMEO.
Not I, no matter.

ROMEO.
See how well she keeps her joints in place.

ROMEO.
Well, she can make all the bones that a man would put to use,
If that joint were to be broken in half,
She would make the wrenching


===== CHECKPOINT 038 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

McCuyl, in whose direction the place should be’d, be straight, and opposite to the east, where the torches should be, so bright and streamy, so to give an almost pitch dark sky to sing and dance. These, in their smoothness and lightness, make a gorgeous curtain upon which to fall asleep; and as the birds that hear them soar out of the clouds, so do I: they sing and dance in the misty air, and stay long in that warm embrace.

ROMEO.
And soft is the earth,
As soft a fir from the soft of the soft of the earth

JULIET.
How soft is the earth,
As soft pressed as a ball
By the soft vibrations of the air,
And as soft and firmer a sheet of smooth powder
Be this air, or the breath of a thousand reels
From this soft touch,
Which softens our bones and softens our hearts,
Brags us all as we fly;
Then softens the stars, dulls the sound of the earth,
Hath made our stars in heaven a rich discourses,
So gives us a warm welcome, and softens the cold of the earth
So that all our needs may reviv’d.

ROMEO.
Tush, thou art breath’d withst music,
And yet soft in heart;
Too soft and hollow to dwell in a happy state.
Love, be wise; good fortune calls wisdom wise.

JULIET.
I should have been wise too; for what I now am,
A fearful lamb that needs food and water,
Staying in the sweet embrace of thine ear,
Which she sings to teach me how to thrive.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim, you say your music speaks for itself.

ROMEO.
But where is the remedy?

JULIET.
By o’er my lodging. Such is life. Love gives a lodging to those that are ill,
Not that lodging helps. Stay, Juliet, stay;
Leave me. There is nothing but love and light. Love and light be my greetings.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou help me? I am too ill to stay.

JULIET.
By faith, good man.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou follow me, love?

EO.
And soft is the earth,
As soft a fir from the soft of the soft of the earth

JULIET.
How soft is the earth,
As soft pressed as a ball
By the soft vibrations of the air,
And as soft and firmer a sheet of smooth powder
Be this air, or the breath of a thousand reels
From this soft touch,
Which softens our bones and softens our hearts,
Brags us all as we fly;
Then softens the stars, dulls the sound of the earth,
Hath made our stars in heaven a rich discourses,
So gives us a warm welcome, and softens the cold of the earth
So that all our needs may reviv’d.

ROMEO.
Tush, thou art breath’d withst music,
And yet soft in heart;
Too soft and hollow to dwell in a happy state.
Love, be wise; good fortune calls wisdom wise.

JULIET.
I should have been wise too; for what I now am,
A fearful lamb that needs food and water,
Staying in the sweet embrace of thine ear,
Which she sings to teach me how to thrive.

ROMEO.
Good pilgrim, you say your music speaks for itself.

ROMEO.
But where is the remedy?

JULIET.
By o’er my lodging. Such is life. Love gives a lodging to those that are ill,
Not that lodging helps. Stay, Juliet, stay;
Leave me. There is nothing but love and light. Love and light be my greetings.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou follow me, love?

ROMEO.
And soft is the earth,
As soft as fir from the soft of the soft of the earth

JULIET.
How soft is the earth,
As soft as fir from the soft of the soft of the earth

JULIET.
As soft as fir as snow
Is the breath of life itself, and the breath of life
As soft as fir from the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the soft of the


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

turtleULA.
Good even to her.

ROMEO.
Now, Peter! where is my father?

ROMEO.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not? Dear father, tell me, tell my ghostly lord,
That thou mayst not tell my lord that I am an ill
Dove.

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
Doth not thou but tell me how I should forget
My dear father’s name? Poor ghostly lord, tell me, tell me, what say’st thou?

ROMEO.
By thy ghostly lord.

EO.
Now, Peter! where is my father?

ROMEO.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not? Dear father, tell me, tell my ghostly lord,
That thou mayst not tell my lord that I am an ill
Dove.

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
Doth not thou but tell me how I should forget
My dear father’s name? Poor ghostly lord, tell me, tell me, what say’st thou?

ROMEO.
By thy ghostly lord.

ROMEO.
This gentleman was a madman. A madman could not be found dead.

ROMEO.
But Romeo’s kinsman may still be,
If that man be found, it will stain his reputation
As is well known in his day.
Or his kinsman may still be found
With worms in his cheek,
As is well known in his memory.
Or both may still be shown guilty.

ROMEO.
I fear that my life is the stake of my ghostly father’s eyes,
That ever since my childhood days
My ghostly father spake wicked words,
And still I live to tell it to these eyes.

ROMEO.
Farewell, good lord; farewell.

EO.
Now, Peter! where is my father?

ROMEO.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not. Dear father, tell me, tell my ghostly lord,
That thou mayst not tell my lord that I am an ill
Dove.

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
I should have told thee that by now. Poor ghostly lord, what news?

ROMEO.
Doth not thou but tell me how I should forget
My dear father’s name? Poor ghostly lord, tell me, tell me, what say’st thou?

ROMEO.
By thy ghostly lord.

ROMEO.
And I spake it to my ghostly father.

ROMEO.
It was my ghostly father


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

./ULIET.
O find my mother!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light; give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me how to die,
Henceforth I’ll keep thee company.

JULIET.
Give me my watch; give me the light;
Give me the light;
Thou desperate pilot, now run on!

JULIET.
Fly fast, bright angel, for thou art my foe!
Stay but a little, I pray thee leave me,
And do the thing I bid thee do; thou but teach me


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

historicEra, what’s wrong with that? Go ask your father.

ROMEO.
O let me stand before thee, friend.
Let me be stifled in this closet,
For fear of loitering there, while thou mayst read this letter.

ROMEO.
Nurse!—What should she do here? What should she do there?

ROMEO.
Tell her I am gone, now that thou hast heard my name.

EO.
O let me stand before thee, friend.
Let me be stifled in this closet,
For fear of loitering there, while thou mayst read this letter.

ROMEO.
Nurse!—What should she do here? What should she do there?

ROMEO.
Tell her I am gone, now that thou hast heard my name.

ROMEO.
But trust me, gentleman, you have found a sweet mistress in this storm.

ROMEO.
I do love a gentleman.

ROMEO.
Indeed I did when I was a lad.

EO.
O let me stand before thee, friend.
Let me be stifled in this closet,
For fear of loitering there, while thou mayst read this letter.

ROMEO.
Nurse!—What should she do here? What should she do there?

ROMEO.
Tell her I am gone, now that thou hast heard my name.

ROMEO.
But trust me, gentleman, you have found a sweet mistress in this storm.

ROMEO.
I do love a gentleman.

ROMEO.
Indeed I did when I was a lad.

ROMEO.
My ghostly confessor, the herald of my dreams,
Doth presage some joyful news tonight, if that herald
Soon follow’d my lead. Here’s a dagger that I must slay
Within the breast of my murdered enemy.
A dagger that I must untie bitterly,
To help temper the fearful night.
A desperate man helps his foe; and when he’s slain,
The desperate look’d on his back, and his ghostly confessor
Soon’s upon the cheek of fame.

ROMEO.
Now, madam, what news? What hast thou there?
The cords that thou overheard at my place of employment
Are but poor ropes that I may carry thee into battle.
Farewell. I have need of a bed.

EO.
But trust me, gentleman, you have found a sweet mistress in this storm.

ROMEO.
I do love a gentleman.

ROMEO.
Indeed I did when I was a lad.

ROMEO.
My ghostly confessor, the herald of my dreams,
Doth presage some joyful news tonight, if that herald
Soon follow’d my lead. Here’s a dagger that I must slay
Within the breast of my slain enemy.
A dagger that I must untie bitterly,
To help temper the fearful night.
A desperate man helps his foe; and when he’s slain,
The desperate look’d on his back, and his ghostly confessor
Soon’s upon the cheek of fame.

ROMEO.
Now, madam, what news? What hast thou there?
The cords that thou overheard at my place of employment
Are but poor ropes that I may carry thee into battle.
Farewell. I have need of a bed.

ROMEO.
And I’ll say farewell to you and your ghostly confessor.

ROMEO.
Good gentle youth, quit thy tongue and do the touching.

EO.
O let me stand before thee, friend.
Let me be stifled in this closet,
For fear of loitering there, while thou mayst read this letter.

ROMEO.
Nurse!—What should she do here? What should she do here?

ROMEO.
Tell her I am gone, now that thou hast heard my name.

ROMEO.
But trust me, gentleman, you have found a sweet mistress in this storm.

ROMEO.
I do love a gentleman.

ROMEO.
Indeed I did when I was a lad.

ROMEO.
My ghostly confessor, the herald of my dreams,
Doth presage some joyful news tonight, if that herald
Soon follow’d my lead. Here’s a dagger that I must slay
Within the breast of my slain enemy.
A dagger that I must untie bitterly,
To help temper the fearful night.
A desperate man helps his foe; and when he’s


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

JuanULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the door,
And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past help!

JULIET.
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. I shall open the


===== CHECKPOINT 039 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

reinforcements. And so came the joyful sight, and the triumphant Benarius; and behold, I ’tis forty days’ hence, and all these monarchs are marching in opposite directions, and are slaughter’d—beating one another with clubs, in one fell swoop, in a bloody struggle, and I’ll bring them shame on my face.

ROMEO.
So shalt thou show me friendship.

ROMEO.
And joy comes first to kill those that hate it.

ROMEO.
It was the nightingale, the herald of God’s doom,
Straining the fearful conflagration of our days
To pluck the deadliest of the tassels out of the air.
I should have been more at home, or went to sleep,
Contempting the apothecary with his ole’ feathers,
Or stifled the roaring dragon with a golden ring,
To lure in the roaring sea. O, I should have gone with thee.

ROMEO.
For I came to take thee.

EO.
And joy comes first to kill those that hate it.

ROMEO.
It was the nightingale, the herald of God’s doom,
Straining the fearful conflagration of our days
To pluck the deadliest of the tassels out of the air.
I should have been more at home, or went to sleep,
Contempting the apothecary with his ole’ feathers,
Or stifled the roaring dragon with a golden ring,
To lure in the roaring sea. O, I should have gone with thee.

ROMEO.
For I came to take thee.

ROMEO.
I am a choking ghost,
Lest in this I should kill thee.

ROMEO.
Bid her devise
So thou mightst not be injurious.

EO.
For I came to take thee.

ROMEO.
I am a choking ghost,
Lest in this I should kill thee.

ROMEO.
Bid her devise
So thou mightst not be injurious.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

EO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

EO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s paramour,
And my lady bedside manner must meet with great sadness tonight.
Farewell. Love, amen.

ROMEO.
I’ll tell thee as I shall.

ROMEO.
Now go along, Tybalt. I will not fail.

ROMEO.
I am the Prince’s param


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ATSEO.
O teach me how I may best avoid this enmity.

ROMEO.
By and by I come to an agreement;
Being bound, and free, to come to an hour
To enquire into your will. I
Will not marry before the hour of my husband’s doom,
Unless such a man be found
To bear a poison more deadly to mankind
Than these Parisines that I heretofore have murdered.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel. I’ll be your witness.

ROMEO.
Whither to?

EO.
By and by I come to an agreement;
Being bound, and free, to come to an hour
To enquire into your will. I
Will not marry before the hour of my husband’s doom,
Unless such a man be found
To bear a poison more deadly to mankind
Than these Parisines that I heretofore have murdered.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel. I’ll be your witness.

ROMEO.
Whither to?

ROMEO.
The damned have no souls.

ROMEO.
The damned have.

ROMEO.
I should murder them both.

ROMEO.
For what reason do I revolt at the sight of you,
And abhor your lawless tyranny?

EO.
Whither to?

ROMEO.
The damned have no souls.

ROMEO.
I should murder them both.

ROMEO.
For what reason do I revolt at the sight of you,
And abhor your lawless tyranny?

ROMEO.
By faith, I feel bound by God to go toward this day,
To ne’er marry before that hour.

EO.
Whither to?

ROMEO.
For what reason do I revolt at the sight of you,
And abhor your lawless tyranny?

ROMEO.
By faith, I feel bound by God to go toward this day,
To ne’er marry before that hour.

ROMEO.
Love, if you cannot love,
Call me a poison, and I’ll be the first to die.

ROMEO.
Blister’d be my poison, for love’s procur’d blood
Doth sweeten well the sour.

EO.
Love, if you cannot love,
Call me a poison, and I’ll be the first to die.

ROMEO.
Blister’d be my poison, for love’s procur’d blood
Doth sweeten well the sour.

ROMEO.
Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man.
Turn back now, foolish tears, and quit thy tongue.
Thou desperate husband lives, that thy love thus vow,
Which thou wilt propagate to the end
With a rear-ward following: ‘Twixt my extremes and me this shall be
A bloody battle. I ’ll to the death, or wi’st thy life in thine eyes
To make thee resign thy tongue and bid me die.
Or if thou despair, flee and be gone.
I’ll be with thee straight, past hope, into another world.
Why, thou desperate case, why weep I?

EO.
Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man.
Turn back now, foolish tears, and quit thy tongue.
Thou desperate husband lives, that thy love thus vow,
Which thou wilt propagate to the end
With a rear-ward following: ‘Twixt my extremes and me this shall be
A bloody battle. I ’ll to the death, or wi’st thy life in thine eyes
To make thee resign thy tongue and bid me die.
Or if thou despair, flee and be gone.
I’ll be with thee straight, past hope, into another world.
Why, thou desperate case, why weep I?

ROMEO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
I will not o’erperch these walls till I shall feel the need.
Night is long since nay night, and the clouds are too heavy for that.
So I dreamt my eye shut, and behold my love stepping into my eye.
It was the youthful love that married my cousin.

EO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
I will not o’erperch these walls till I shall feel the need.
Night is long since nay night, and the clouds are too heavy for that.
So I dreamt my eye shut


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

outeO’d be my father? O, that a truth so fairly reported should shame me.
My name is Vernon. How art thou out of breath, when I am here?
Why dost thou cram thy teeth into my mouth,
To sunder my nourish’d hunger? Why dost thou cram thy breath into my mouth,
To sunder my nourish’d hunger?

Shot, thou hast wounded me. Cujo. What hast thou to do,
When I am not here? At leisure.
Come, cordial. What dost thou there,
That I may speak with thee tonight,
If thou remember’st me?

Bondage. What of it? Be not tell’d. I will not tell thee.

JULIET.
Madam, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

JULIET.
O God! Did my heart’s dear mother sin against thee so?
Did she rather hate thee than marry thee?
Did she rather swear an untimely abomination,
Or doff thy holy name? O, that I should know it.

JULIET.
Madam, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

JULIET.
O God! Did my heart’s dear mother sin against thee so?
Did she rather hate thee than marry thee?
Did she rather swear an untimely abomination,
Or doff thy holy name? O, that I should know it.

JULIET.
Madam, what news? What does the Prince’s doom?
What satisfaction craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

JULIET.
O God! Did my heart’s dear mother sin against thee so?
Did she rather hate thee than marry thee?
Did she rather swear an untimely abomination,
Or doff thy holy name? O, that I should know it.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy thee, madam.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
Is Leomin’s siege at hand?
Is Jove’s death in triumph?
O most bonny be some poison. Such is the unrest!
Howlings attends this like a roaring cat.
The mask is on fire; Romeo’s ensign is burnt;
His entrails are strewn all round the place,
From head to toe in smoke; then with a golden ring,
A cauldron full of deadly fireworks rushes forth,
As will-o’er-wield’d churls toward heaven.
The general populace is exult’d,
And all lamentation is silenced. Then is unleaven’d.
The time is ne’er so. O, that a reveler should come to weep.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For that which thou spakest not. O be gone.
With tears, you poor tyrant, goad’st me to thy doom.
Live, and be burnt for liars.
Or, if thou wilt not, be cut off from my lawless reign.
The world is in thy face, and my name is in thy lips.
In my fiery embrace, kill me, and then be burnt for liars.

JULIET.
O God! Did my heart’s dear mother sin against thee so?
Did she rather hate thee than marry thee?
Did she rather swear an untimely abomination,
Or doff thy holy name? O, that I should know it.

JULIET.
Madam, what news? What does the Prince’s doom?
What satisfaction craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

JULIET.
O God! Did my heart’s dear mother sin against thee so?
Did she rather hate thee than marry thee?
Did she rather swear an untimely abomination,
Or doff thy holy name? O, that I should know it.

JULIET.
O God! Did my heart’s dear mother sin against thee so?
Did she rather hate thee than marry thee?
Did she rather swear an untimely abomination,
Or doff thy holy name? O, that I should know it.


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

IsULIET.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help!

ROMEO.
Where is my mother? Where is she?
Where is my father and my mother?
Where is my mother and my father and my mother?

ROMEO.
Where is my father and my mother and my mother and father and mother?

ROMEO.
Where is my mother and my father and my mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father and mother and father


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

MéULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
Come hither, all officers and men; let me now be left alone.
I have some ill fain to do with thee this afternoon,
Being in town, and so thou mayst not attend me.
I should rather be here than here; and thus I say thee gone,
Since I have more favour to do than attend thee.

JULIET.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins
That almost freezes up food. Let me be set free,
And without fear of consequence, go with thee straight.

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of thee, or shall I speak at this?
The ill-favourable subject of thy name
Is yet too fond a point to cross,
And I must confess that I am not well.
O, then, at least thou mayst not be vex’d.

JULIET.
Nurse!—What should I do here?
My dismal scene I needs must act alone.
Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then tomorrow morning,
Or shall I be stoned here tomorrow morning,
To death or be stoned here tonight?
I do not know. But either thou mayst think it fit to go with me.
Henceforward I am not far from home.

JULIET.
Yea, excuse me; I have news. What is the Prince’s doom?
The epileptic fits of rage that thou dost rage
Upon this night’s revels? Or am I mad?
Ah me, how may I forget the dismal mask
Of Anselmo’s death, and the pale yellow of his remains?
Forgive me, madam; this is not my husband.
This is not Romeo, nor the one who poisoned me.
Alack, alack, that thou art the one to poison me.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say, ‘Here’s poison? Whate’er thou hear’st or seest,
Is Romeo slaughter’d? Whate’er thou hear’st or seest,
Is Herod the dearer? Or is the Hunt’d more wicked,
For lo, when they are at thy door,
More cunningly plotting to take thee here
Than with their swords? Or bid me lurk, hide thy face,
And let the fearful mask fall on my head,
To stare into their eyes and to speak their name.
Hath no poison yet in their robes? Say thou but Romeo,
And they will kill thee with a kiss.
Or if thou swear not, hide not by the rose-tree.
Or if thou swearest, see how quickly they come to kill thee.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. Poor bankrout, break at once.
What bankrout was that, the less guilty bankrout,
So bitterly brawling with the devil that made thee her prisoner?

JULIET.
That villain made thee her prisoner? O, she now lives,
And in prison makes for a cheerful face.
Howlings, madam, what news? The ropes are in place!
Madam, if those ropes fail, what consequence will that leave?
My true knight, noble County Paris,
Put my true knight, Henry IV.,
Upon yond pomegranate tree and cut me an empty finger,
And that same finger I shall soon die with,
As a bridegroom brings his dead daughter to life.
Prodigious marriage ensues. What less shall I do,
Thou and my true knight, Henry,
Together in my true love’s ring.
The hours stand still, heaven is not day,
There is darkness and the world is not day.
Come, vial. What if my true love,
Live to tell it now? Or shall I die,
As a bridegroom brings his dead daughter to life?

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. Poor bankrout, break at once.
What bankrout was that, the less guilty bankrout,
So bitterly brawling with the devil that made thee her prisoner?

JULIET.
Madam, if those ropes fail, what consequence will that leave?
My true knight, noble County Paris,
Put my true knight, Henry IV.,
Upon yond pomegranate tree and cut me an empty finger,
And that same finger


===== CHECKPOINT 040 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

itation” is the term most often invoked in opposition to the law. It is a term that I do not think I have the power or will to use to describe the state of mind, or the feeling I have when I hear it. As a general rule of thumb, I should say no to the use of the word in that which it may be more expressly and expressly to convey.

I am a speaker. And that which I may speak, should be of a more general and substantial sound. But I must confess, that all this speaks for the best.

JULIET.
Nay, good goose, put not another word to that which I do hate.

JULIET.
Well, what can I do?

ULIET.
Nay, good goose, put not another word to that which I do hate.

JULIET.
Well, what can I do?

JULIET.
To help you, dear Nurse, we have come to this hour so messenger to fetch you.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Wilt thou delay us here?

ULIET.
Well, what can I do?

JULIET.
To help you, dear Nurse, we have come to this hour so messenger to fetch you.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Wilt thou delay us here?

JULIET.
By ere thou doff our request we may fetch thee.

JULIET.
In short, we have got thee; and we bid thee depart.
Hie hence, merry pilgrim; farewell, and good Nurse,—

JULIET.
Courage, man, thou art too fast.
Stay not, be gone, thou home, fast.
Come, cordial. I see that thou art ill.
The measure done, I will come to thee at evening mass.
Come cordial, come Nurse, I see that thou art well.

JULIET.
This is Deliverance; deliverance from the dungeon walls.
Hast thou not found me there? Hast thou not a torch?
Vile is thy nurse, she is within! Thou art so infernal!
Why dost thou not bring me poison?
Why, thou hast urg’d me with thine eyes shut,
Because thou art not well. Hast thou not a friend?
Live, and be merciful, and I’ll die.

JULIET.
Ay me. Why, then, shall I come to thee at evening mass.
Come cordial, come Nurse, I see that thou art well.

JULIET.
This is Deliverance; deliverance from the dungeon walls.
Hast thou not found me there? Hast thou not a torch?
Vile is thy nurse, she is within! Thou art so infernal!
Why dost thou not bring me poison?
Why, thou hast urg’d me with thine eyes shut,
Because thou art not well. Hast thou not a friend?
Live, and be merciful, and I’ll die.

JULIET.
Ay me. Why, then, shall I come to thee at evening mass.
Come cordial, come Nurse, I see that thou art well.

JULIET.
This is Deliverance; deliverance from the dungeon walls.
Hast thou not found me there? Hast thou not a torch?
Vile is thy nurse, she is within! Thou art so infernal!
Why dost thou not bring me poison?
Why, thou hast urg’d me with thine eyes shut,
Because thou art not well. Hast thou not a friend?
Live, and be merciful, and I’ll die.

JULIET.
Ay me. Why, then, shall I come to thee at evening mass.
Come cordial, come Nurse, I see that thou art well.

JULIET.
This is Deliverance; deliverance from the dungeon walls.
Hast thou not found me there? Hast thou not a torch?
Vile is thy nurse, she is within! Thou art so infernal!
Why dost thou not bring me poison?
Why, thou hast urg’d me with thine eyes shut,
Because thou art not well. Hast thou not a friend?
Live, and be merciful, and I’ll die.

JULIET.

JULIET.
There is thy gold. There is thy life.

JULIET.
I pay thy poverty, thou hast shame’d it.
Come,


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

FarmingEO.
So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that.
Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy!

JULIET.
O God! Didst thou devise the stratagems so soon?

JULIET.
Indeed I doubt it did. God is’t infinite,
So shows himself fairly satisfied. He make’d these brutes
With oxen and fire. Mine will be burn’d, and theirs with blood
Is enough for all. Go, and kill them all.

JULIET.
I would thou hadst my life, if it had ended there.

JULIET.
Nurse!—What should she do here? Why, do I interrupt you.
What should she do here? Why, do I interrupt you.

JULIET.
Madam, I am here to hear from you.
Isabel, the Prince’s maid? Why dost she not come?
What of that? Is she gone? Why, she’s gone. Why dost she not come?
Isabel, the Prince’s nurse? Why dost she not come?

JULIET.
Madam, I am here to hear from you.
Isabel, the Prince’s maid? Why dost she not come?
What of that? Is she gone? Why, she’s gone.

JULIET.
Madam, I am here to hear from you.
Isabel, the Prince’s nurse? Why dost she not come?
What of that? Is she gone? Why, she’s gone.

JULIET.
No, madam; give me some light. Lie thou there.
What’s going on here? What’s going on here?

JULIET.
What’s going on here? Why weep I then,
As now bescreen from the battle?
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dost thou mother
Be gone? Why follow’d not? Why, lest I should ask thee again.

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother. Why dost thou lie?

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dost thou mother
Be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother.

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother.

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother.

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother.

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother.

JULIET.
Why dost thou mother Paris be gone? Why dash’st thou from her sight,
Or from her breast? Why descend, and why coquett’d with me?
Why believe’st thou, and believe me, that thou wilt find out
What is wrong with my mother.

JULIET.


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

istineEO.
I would thou hadst my bones,
And I thy gold: and I thy torches
Direct my ways.

ROMEO.
If I profane these, and thou gav’st them,
Thou wilt be prosperous, and Mercutio slain.

JULIET.
Peace, father, be merciful; Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add to the grief
Of so many that were slain.
If Tybalt be slain, then father, be merciful.
For Mercutio hath slain Tybalt,
And Jove slain himself. Veronais but a faint moon
Doth add


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

itablyULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! My conduct wisely attends this business.
Call me but care, and I’ll be discharged.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?

JULIET.
Not yet, unless thou tell me how.

JULIET.
Is it well? Then pardon me.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
For both are upon thy name.
Vioh shall never fail him.
Hath Romeo but love a daughter? That may be so,
But not a daughter of mine own.
Be not so long to have that name.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love,
That cutt’st my youth short in love.
Had he not, he still would have been a ghost,
Hath Romeo slain himself, ere that thy love
Come to redeem him. Whate’er thou hear’st of it,
Call me but tears, and I’ll be purg’d.

JULIET.
O, break, my heart. This shall break at once.
It was my father, whom I love


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

plainly, methinks he heard her voice.
’Tis she, the mother of my Lord,
Whate’er thou hear’st or seest, that is not Romeo?
Or is it else, an Ethiopian?
What’s she to him, that is not within our power?
What’s she to him that is not within our power?
O, that he should kill himself.
If he should do so, he shall slay himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.

O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O, that he should have slain himself.
O


===== CHECKPOINT 041 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

FormerULIET.
In what manner art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and wherefore?

JULIET.
By what cause art thou out of breath, and


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

。O shut the door, and when thou hast done so, thou door’st not close. If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no heed to voices’ other than those of mine own, thou shalt not keep the door.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

O, I am not I if thou canst teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me to walk.

’Tis but thy will, which is the first proof of faith,
And ’tis but thy word that proves it.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time, thou canst not teach me


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

uncommon. O tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this, or that thou dost not bring it to my attention? Or else, madam, why defy me, and bid me leap?

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
And more abundantly than myself.
Why, then, didst thou break thy tongue
When thou didst bower my daughter in thy womb?

JULIET.
Because thou wast envious of mine.
I am not a man to be besotted;
Being but a maid, I am wife and daughter;
Being but a goose, I die young,
Being but a Capulet, I die warm;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die warm;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;
Being but a Capulet, I die lame;


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

symbolsULIET.
Then spake the holy man,

Tut thou he was not born to shame,
His name is Tybalt,
And Tybalt is the god of death and chaos.
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore Juliet is the god of death and chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains, and all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god of chaos.
Therefore all these are gods,
And all these are captains,
And all these are I;
Therefore Tybalt is the god


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

GulULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show


===== CHECKPOINT 042 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ecakeULIET.
Ay me, but Nurse,
If any of my sisters be here,
I will send her woe.
Either she be murdered, or she be dishonour’d.
I pray thee both, madam,
And madam’s kinsman, put thy finger on
This vex’d issue, one that is feign’d,
And puts my husband in prison.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

JULIET.
No, madam; for Tybalt’s death made him sin.
Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, a madman,
A villain angelical character!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, a madman,
A villain angelical character!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, a madman,
A villain angelical character!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, a madman,
A villain angelical character!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

atheULIET.
Then shall I show thee courtesy.
Come, Nurse,—Come Nurse,—Come, tear thy hair,
And when thou shalt see thee, come weep with me.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy flesh;
Farewell, friend. I am content,
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.

EO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy flesh;
Farewell, friend. I am content,
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy flesh;
Farewell, friend. I am content,
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
And I am satisfied, even in so much joy,
That I shall be a Partaker of thy light.

ROMEO.
I am.

EO.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy flesh;
Farewell, friend. I am content,
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
And I am satisfied, even in so much joy,
That I shall be a Partaker of thy light.

ROMEO.
I am.

ROMEO.
Then shall I show thee courtesy.
Come, Nurse,—Come, tear thy hair,
And when thou shalt see thee, come weep with me.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy flesh;
Farewell, friend. I am content,
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
And I am satisfied, even in so much joy,
That I shall be a Partaker of thy light.

ROMEO.
I am.

ROMEO.
Then shall I show thee courtesy.
Come, Nurse,—Come, tear thy hair,
And when thou shalt see thee, come weep with me.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy flesh;
Farewell, friend. I am content,
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
And I am satisfied, even in so much joy,
That I shall be a Partaker of thy light.

ROMEO.
I am.

ROMEO.
And I am satisfied, even in so much joy,
That I shall be a Partaker of thy light.

ROMEO.
Indeed I should have been; the more light I shone upon thy cheek,
The more glorious my being is,
The more I will be satisfied, the more I shall be a Partaker of thy light.

ROMEO.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

urgedULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune!’s her eye so rich in beauty,
That when she dies, all of her beauty will be gone,
And her beacons bright with her ghostly light;
So winning heartsick mortals by making them forget
That whose eyesight she made rich in beauty.

ROMEO.
Good even to Fortune!

JULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
Is Placentia dead? What of that?

JULIET.
O, break, my heart.
Is Romeo slain?
No, she is not. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell,
And there die banished. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Partially banished,
She is banished to hell. Part


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ouslyEO.
I have a faint cold fear in my breast’s eye that almost freezes up the heat of life.
Some poison gas is in my breast. Ah, such is the terror in my breast that I cannot move it.
Some other poison, I know not, within my breast.
Howlings attends it. I am too bold,
Too rash, too rash, to be prevented.
Come, poison, come Nurse. I’ll lay waste of my breast.

ROMEO.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

ROMEO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?

JULIET.
Is she mad? That dreadful trumpet sound upon trumpet?
O, I am fortune’s fool!—Farewell, fool!

JULIET.
How oddly is her lodging?

ROMEO.
Here’s a heavy burden! Such is the noise of my lodging.

ROMEO.
There is—dead, ere my bones are ready for living.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

EO.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?

JULIET.
Is she mad? That dreadful trumpet sound upon trumpet?
O, I am fortune’s fool!—Farewell, fool!

JULIET.
How oddly is her lodging?

ROMEO.
Here’s a heavy burden! Such is the noise of my lodging.

ROMEO.
There is—dead, ere my bones are ready for living.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

JULIET.
How oddly is her lodging?

ROMEO.
Here’s a heavy burden! Such is the noise of my lodging.

ROMEO.
There is—dead, ere my bones are ready for living.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

JULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, by her countenance.
Misshapen beauty hath no limits,
Nor can she combine extremes; all within her limits.

EO.
There is—dead, ere my bones are ready for living.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

JULIET.
How oddly is her lodging?

ROMEO.
Here’s a heavy burden! Such is the noise of my lodging.

ROMEO.
There is—dead, ere my bones are ready for living.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

JULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, by her countenance.
Misshapen beauty hath no limits,
Nor can she combine extremes; all within her limits.

ROMEO.
So bare the earth is my bed,
And my breast pump’d with honey.

JULIET.
What bed is that?

EO.
Here’s a heavy burden! Such is the noise of my lodging.

ROMEO.
There is—dead, ere my bones are ready for living.
Come hither Nurse,— Nurse, come Nurse!

JULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, by her countenance.
Misshapen beauty hath no limits,
Nor can she combine extremes; all within her limits.

ROMEO.
So bare the earth is my bed,
And my breast pump’d with honey.

JULIET.
What bed is that?

JULIET.
Dry night follows the lazy eye of cell.
Night follows the lazy cheek of cell.
Beauty follows night, eyes only follow day.
The grey-ey’d morn follows the lazy eye of night.
The grey-ey’d morn follows the lazy cheek of day.
The grey-ey’d morn follows the lazy eye of night.

JULIET.
What window is that?

JULIET.
Is she not so sweet?

ROMEO.
Th’in window, that doth not window,
That window upon a snowy night
Lifts the loft above the ground,
And therefore the days move on
So fine a mist hangs upon the brow of night,
As is a rich crimson in a gentleman’s hand
A hand that hath more skill
To make his will strong than that of mine.

EO.
What bed is that?

JULIET.
Dry night follows the lazy eye of cell.
Night follows


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

inceptionE’s perfection, and that of his soul.

JULIET.
That which we call noumenal joy
Is but a little way above compare
With Juliet’s sweet crown, or the severity of that
Which she hath lost: her fair, fair sun,
Whiter than new snow, hath more to do with the light of day
Than the fiery heaven that is shed
On a snowy woman’s finger.

JULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis but my sweet love’s doom
That is my woe now. Let it be. Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, and sick with grief:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and most discreet a moanswoman.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? Then have at thee, my dear Romeo.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, and sick with grief:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and most discreet a moanswoman.
Farewell.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? Then have at thee, my dear Romeo.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, and sick with grief:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and most discreet a moanswoman.
Farewell.

JULIET.
O, thou dost love, and not methinks thou yet
Yet hath found me? I would have thee gone,
But I have yet found none but sweet Nurse
And out of all the other remedies
Thus satisfied, yet none of the remedies
Displant my vexation with sadness.

ROMEO.
Thou wast not so for the world I saw thee gone.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? Then have at thee, my dear Romeo.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, and sick with grief:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and most discreet a moanswoman.
Farewell.

JULIET.
O, thou dost love, and not methinks thou yet
Yet hath found me? I would have thee gone,
But I have yet found none but sweet Nurse
And out of all the other remedies
Thus satisfied, yet none of the remedies
Displant my vexation with sadness.

ROMEO.
Thou wast not so for the world I saw thee gone.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? Then have at thee, my dear Romeo.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, and sick with grief:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and most discreet a moanswoman.
Farewell.

JULIET.
O, thou dost love, and not methinks thou yet
Yet hath found me? I would have thee gone,
But I have yet found none but sweet Nurse
And out of all the other remedies
Thus satisfied, yet none of the remedies
Displant my vexation with sadness.

ROMEO.
Thou wast not so for the world I saw thee gone.

JULIET.
Wilt thou be gone? Then have at thee, my dear Romeo.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, and sick with grief:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and most discreet a moanswoman.
Fare


===== CHECKPOINT 043 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

feedULIET.
I will not fail; and will’st give thine all.

ROMEO.
But no, no, no, no, Nurse. Go, get thee hence.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
The smoke exhales from the clos’d book,
Brags and ropes that have been discharg’d of breath
By dull discourses of untimely death.
A torchbearer for woe.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many men to do my bidding;
I must be gone as quickly as possible,
If this do not work out well.

EO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
The smoke exhales from the clos’d book,
Brags and ropes that have been discharg’d of breath
By dull discourses of untimely death.
A torchbearer for woe.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many men to do my bidding;
I must be gone as quickly as possible,
If this do not work out well.

ROMEO.
And that’s no excuse, though I think it best
To stay behind the white-puffing clouds,
To wink and think thou wilt leave me.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
The smoke exhales from the clos’d book,
Brags and ropes that have been discharg’d of breath
By dull discourses of untimely death.
A torchbearer for woe.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many men to do my bidding;
I must be gone as quickly as possible,
If this do not work out well.

ROMEO.
And that’s no excuse, though I think it best
To stay behind the white-puffing clouds,
To wink and think thou wilt leave me.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
The smoke exhales from the clos’d book,
Brags and ropes that have been discharg’d of breath
By dull discourses of untimely death.
A torchbearer for woe.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many men to do my bidding;
I must be gone as quickly as possible,
If this do not work out well.

ROMEO.
And that’s no excuse, though I think it best
To stay behind the white-puffing clouds,
To wink and think thou wilt leave me.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
The smoke exhales from the clos’d book,
Brags and ropes that have been discharg’d of breath
By dull discourses of untimely death.
A torchbearer for woe.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many men to do my bidding;
I must be gone as quickly as possible,
If this do not work out well.

ROMEO.
And that’s no excuse, though I think it best
To stay behind the white-puffing clouds,
To wink and think thou wilt leave me.

ROMEO.
Not I, unless some herald come to woo
My kinsman hither and woo thee
Soon.—

ROMEO.
The smoke exhales from the clos’d book,
Brags and ropes that have been discharg’d of breath
By


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

itism. They have got me wounded, and I am dead.

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

EO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

EO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may also be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. Show me a ring, Nurse.

ROMEO. Thou art such a gentleman.

EO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
the hour of nine,
and found him dead,—

ROMEO. That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

ROMEO. That may likewise be.

ROMEO. I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

doorsEO.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.
Farewell, dear father. I see you have found my runaway’s hide.
Hold, dear Juliet, hold, dear me! I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
Madam, what devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?

JULIET.
That devil art she that murders my husband?
Farewell, dear father. I am here.
I am Walburga, the Maid of God.
She’s the half-divinest ghost of sweet servitude,
That wails in abey of night upon the look’d life of my paramour.
O, she delights in torment! The world is her prisoner!
Thus I follow her example and stay behind her back.

JULIET.
And stay, good Walburga, behind the abbey wall.
Where noble ancestors and holy shrines are. Look, all these dead folks,
Who, even in their dead masks, still seem holy.

JULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
She owes me her liberty, both civil and military.
I must love her as much as she owes me;
For she owes me her life, both for and against hate.
But love’s transgression is murder, and not Juliet’s.
Therefore law enforcement must act in her behalf.
Where is my father? Why, he’s yet out of breath.
Where is my mother? Why, she’s not there.
Where is my father and my mother? Both dead.
Where is my father and my mother? Both Assassins.
Where is my mother and my father? Both Nurse.
Where is my mother and my father? Both Assassins.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent. Mine for his murder.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I; for death here lies pay’d. Get your ropes,
And when you shall be dead, cut them out in little stars.
Vile earth to earth resign; end motion here,
And thou and Romeo press one heavy bier.
Henceforward I am proof positive of thy love.

JULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
She owes me her liberty, both civil and military.
I must love her as much as she owes me;
For she owes me her life, both for and against hate.
But love’s transgression is murder, and not Juliet’s.
Therefore law enforcement must act in her behalf.
Where is my father? Why, he’s yet out of breath.
Where is my mother? Why, she’s not there.
Where is my father and my mother? Both dead.
Where is my father and my mother? Both Assassins.
Where is my mother and my father? Both Nurse.
Where is my mother and my father? Both Assassins.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent. Mine for his murder.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I; for death here lies pay’d. Get your ropes,
And when you shall be dead, cut them out in little stars.
Vile earth to earth resign; end motion here,
And thou and Romeo press one heavy bier.
Henceforward I am proof positive of thy love.

JULIET.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
She owes me her liberty, both civil and military.
I must love her as much as she owes me;
For she owes me her life, both for and against hate.
But love’s transgression is murder, and not Juliet’s.
Therefore law enforcement must act in her behalf.
Where is my father? Why, he’s yet out of breath.
Where is my mother? Why, she’s not there.
Where is my father and my mother? Both dead.
Where is my father and my mother? Both Assassins.
Where is my mother and my father? Both Nurse.
Where is my mother and my father? Both Assassins.
So tell me, Nurse,—How shall


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

UltraULIET.
And thou art my guide,’Tis but a faint note
To guide me to where thou need’st to go.

ROMEO.
By and by I go; by and by I to the west,
And stay; by east to west,
And stay.

JULIET.
O God! Did Romeo’s hand shed Tybalt’s blood?

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Despised substance of divinest show!
A smoke-ey’d morn smiles on a cheeky mountain lion’s back,
Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light;
A torch-holder o’er-feather’d goes into the centre of stars,
His beams sparkling in and out of tune with the night’s night,
His beauties imitated and his have been feathered back
To heavenly bliss.
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

ROMEO.
A gorgeous palace, that sweetest palace in all the air!

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

ULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!Despised substance of divinest show!Despised substance of divinest show!Despised substance of divinest show!
A smoke-ey’d morn smiles on a cheeky mountain lion’s back,
Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light;A torch-holder o’er-feather’d goes into the centre of stars,
His beams sparkling in and out of tune with the night’s night,
His beauties imitated and his have been feathered back
To heavenly bliss.
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

ROMEO.
A gorgeous palace, that sweetest palace in all the air!

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
What, shall this lamentation be brief? I do protest that I am not at leisure
To look after thee while thou hast my hands;
Or if thou jealous dost return to pry
In what I further shall intend to do,
By heaven’s mercy I will tear thee joint by joint,
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.
The time and my intents are savage-wild,
More fierce and more inexorable far
Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

ULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful and leave me to my grief.

ROMEO.
What, shall this lamentation be brief? I do protest that I am not at leisure
To look after thee while thou hast my hands;
Or if thou jealous dost return to pry
In what I further shall intend to do,
By heaven’s mercy I will tear thee joint by joint,
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.
The time and my intents are savage-wild,
More fierce and more inexorable far
Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

JULIET.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

hullULIET.
I would thou hast comforted me marvellous much in my sorrow;
Have I need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
But have thee speak again good night,
To engrossing night woe and make my bones stand out again.

JULIET.
I would I were thy plantains.

ROMEO.
Would I were thy limbs.

ROMEO.
I wish.

ULIET.
I would thou hast comforted me marvellous much in my sorrow;
Have I need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
But have thee speak again good night,
To engrossing night woe and make my bones stand out again.

JULIET.
I would I were thy plantains.

ROMEO.
Would I were thy limbs.

ROMEO.
I wish.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss, Jove.

ROMEO.
What more can I do to you today, than by making me a rich Friar?

ROMEO.
By a marriage of sourd sweet terror to rich joy.
Farewell, dear Friar, and I’ll descend.

JULIET.
Your limbs do open to joy when you feel them.
Proudly I am a Capulet, an Elf, and a Prince’s Good Friar.
But to have you close is to me a feasting gall;
Being but a little way above our heads, we have to look our best.

ROMEO.
A torch for our falconer’s lodging; my stainless pomegranate light;
Your tiptoe is as smooth and light as silk,
And my ‘goose-puffing merrily makes me effervescence.
I must indeed be a Capulet to you.

ULIET.
Would I were thy plantains.

ROMEO.
Would I were thy limbs.

ROMEO.
I wish.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss, Jove.

ROMEO.
What more can I do to you today, than by making me a rich Friar?

ROMEO.
By a marriage of sourd sweet terror to rich joy.
Farewell, dear Friar, and I’ll descend.

JULIET.
Your limbs do open to joy when you feel them.
Proudly I am a Capulet, an Elf, and a Prince’s Good Friar.
But to have you close is to me a feasting gall;
Being but a little way above our heads, we have to look our best.

ROMEO.
A torch for our falconer’s lodging; my stainless pomegranate light;
Your tiptoe is as smooth and light as silk,
And my ‘goose-puffing merrily makes me effervescence.
I must indeed be a Capulet to you.

ROMEO.
I met the Prince at Lawrence’ cell,
Thou the County Guard, and gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

ROMEO.
I am content, and shall henceforth stay.

ULIET.
I would I were thy plantains.

ROMEO.
Would I were thy limbs.

ROMEO.
I wish.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss, Jove.

ROMEO.
What more can I do to you today, than by making me a rich Friar?

ROMEO.
By a marriage of sourd sweet terror to rich joy.
Farewell, dear Friar, and I’ll descend.

JULIET.
Your limbs do open to joy when you feel them.
Proudly I am a Capulet, an Elf, and a Prince’s Good Friar.
But to have you close is to me a feasting gall;
Being but a little way above our heads, we have to look our best.

ROMEO.
A torch for our falconer’s lodging; my stainless pomegranate light;
Your tiptoe is as smooth and light as silk,
And my ‘goose-puff


===== CHECKPOINT 044 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

antingULIET.
Good heart, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET.
Good father, at what? It seems you have it in vain.
The world’s fair offer sweetens with every passing day.
Some day my lord’s seal’d good news would serve such sweet ears well,
And my faithful lady would not.

JULIET.
No matter. But let us rejoice in blessed bliss.

JULIET


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

BrULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

EO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?

ROMEO.
What’s up, Juliet?


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

uveULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, break, my heart.
In a minute, a minute, I will answer this vexation.
Mercutio, the Prince’s Gear!
What news? What hast thou there?
What hast thou to do in this tomb?
My only love sprung from thy dead will!
A torch that hurl’d such vile matter
As thou dost love burnish it before thy eyes!
The time and my intents are savage-wild!
Why, then, hast thou no pitying eyes?
Why, thou canst not tell me who thou art.
What’s thou up to?
I have been feasting with my dead man in a dream.
How oddly thou repliest. What’s up with that?
‘Your will I hear more at this hour.

Brief sounds make thee think I live,
Or that thou overheard’st my ghostly passion.
What’s thou up to?
‘Your bad temper,’s excuse. I’ll hear more tomorrow.

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, break, my heart.
In a minute, a minute, I will answer this vexation.
Mercutio, the Prince’s Gear!
What news? What hast thou to do in this tomb?
My only love sprung from thy dead will!
A torch that hurl’d such vile matter
As thou dost love burnish it before thy eyes!
The time and my intents are savage-wild!
Why, then, hast thou no pitying eyes?
Why, thou canst not tell me who thou art.
What’s thou up to?
I have been feasting with my dead man in a dream.
How oddly thou repliest. What’s up with that?
‘Your will I hear more at this hour.

Brief sounds make thee think I live,
Or that thou overheard’st my ghostly passion.
What’s thou up to?
‘Your bad temper,’s excuse. I’ll hear more tomorrow.

JULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, break, my heart.
In a minute, a minute, I will answer this vexation.
Mercutio, the Prince’s Gear!
What news? What hast thou to do in this tomb?
My only love sprung from thy dead will!
A torch that hurl’d such vile matter
As thou dost love burnish it before thy eyes!
The time and my intents are savage-wild!
Why, then, hast thou no pitying eyes?
Why, thou canst not tell me who thou art.
What’s thou up to?
I have been feasting with my dead man in a dream.
How oddly thou repliest. What’s up to?


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

CurEO.
That gentleman, the Prince’s near ally,
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt
In my behalf; my reputation stain’d
With Tybalt’s slander,—Tybalt, that an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,
Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel.

JULIET.
That an hour
Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

92ULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, break, my heart.
In a minute, a minute, I will purg’d.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
By a gracious moon I vow to thee.

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death.

EO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
Ay me, what sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand?

ROMEO.
By a gracious moon I vow to thee.

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death.

ROMEO.
By a blessed moon I vow to thee.

ROMEO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
My love hath been the smoke of thy lips,
Though love’s shadows be vast enough to disperse
Thee Cupid’s rays of light across the heaven.
In such a marriage, splendour is not so much to look on,
As to count the burnt-out crown.

ROMEO.
I pay thy love only love that is mine own.

EO.
By a blessed moon I vow to thee.

ROMEO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
My love hath been the smoke of thy lips,
Though love’s shadows be vast enough to disperse
Thee Cupid’s rays of light across the heaven.
In such a marriage, splendour is not so much to look on,
As to count the burnt-out crown.

ROMEO.
I pay thy love only love that is mine own.

ROMEO.
Proud knight, apace. Why, then, shall I follow thee hither?
The black-brow’d knight is come to woo;
And none but my love rivals shall bid him farewell.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou follow me? There lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my swords. Come, bitter conduct, come,
One that I may shake off thy yoke.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

EO.
By a blessed moon I vow to thee.

ROMEO.
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet.
My love hath been the smoke of thy lips,
Though love’s shadows be vast enough to disperse
Thee Cupid’s rays of light across the heaven.
In such a marriage, splendour is not so much to look on,
As to count the burnt-out crown.

ROMEO.
I pay thy love only love that is mine own.

ROMEO.
Proud knight, apace. Why, then, shall I follow thee hither?
The black-brow’d knight is come to woo;
And none but my love rivals shall bid him farewell.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou follow me? There lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my swords. Come, bitter conduct, come,
One that I may shake off thy yoke.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

EO.
O wilt thou follow me? There lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of my swords. Come, bitter conduct, come,
One that I may shake off thy yoke.
Thou chidd’st me oft for loving Rosaline.

ROMEO.
That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

ROMEO.
Good


===== CHECKPOINT 045 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

507ULIET.
Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Good morrow?

ULIET.
Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
Good morrow?

JULIET.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.

ROMEO.
Good morrow?

JULIET.
What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter’d and is Tybalt dead?
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

JULIET.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those two are gone?

ROMEO.
My dearest cousin, and my dearer lord?
Then dreadful trumpet sound the general doom,
For who is living, if those


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

scenarioI must confess, that in my youth I despised him; but in my heart I love him. Whenceforward I repent my love, and be reconciled.— JESUS.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. If thou jealous dost cram me with necessaries,
Do thou but send me such men tomorrow as
Will furnish me with sufficient necessaries.
Go, counsellor; I will accompany thee.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, madam,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. If thou jealous dost cram me with necessaries,
Do thou but send me such men tomorrow as
Will furnish me with sufficient necessaries.
Go, counsellor; I will accompany thee.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, madam,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. If thou jealous dost cram me with necessaries,
Do thou but send me such men tomorrow as
Will furnish me with sufficient necessaries.
Go, counsellor; I will accompany thee.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, madam,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. If thou jealous dost cram me with necessaries,
Do thou but send me such men tomorrow as
Will furnish me with sufficient necessaries.
Go, counsellor; I will accompany thee.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, madam,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. If thou jealous dost cram me with necessaries,
Do thou but send me such men tomorrow as
Will furnish me with sufficient necessaries.
Go, counsellor; I will accompany thee.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

UREULIET.
Well, if that sweet torture be of more comfort,
Than that sweet satisfaction be much sweeter,
Do thou but send me letters from heaven
By whom I may enquire after my madam.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!
The more I give, the more shall I give to thee.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O true saint, grant this hand,
Whate’er thou speak’st will teach me how to lose a foothold,
Or a stair-house view exposes itself to the sun.
Mercutio, the sunna, the wind,
All these are mere shadows that mortals conceal
By flattering their radiance with their heads,
Which their radiance produces in their eyes.
Show me an emperor, let me behold
A charnel-house where my sweet love lies.
Live, and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

JULIET.
O find me, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but send me letters from heaven
By whom I may enquire after my madam.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but send me letters from heaven
By whom I may enquire after my madam.

JULIET.
Madam, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ROMEO.
I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am. Where is my Romeo?

ULIET.
O find me, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ROMEO.
I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
What must I do in this?

ULIET.
Madam, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

EntryULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
What’s he that now is going out of door?
Is he a Parisian? What’s he in yonder tower?

JULIET.
He is, after all, a Capulet.
What’s in a Capulet?
A club, a ring, a goose,
A dagger, all in one!
I bear no hatred, love no hateful appellation,
I only wish to be married to one I love.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

JULIET.
Will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
Not guilty, madam; thou wilt slay me.
The sin’d offender hath made me a bed
With thee since first my conversion.
I bear no hatred, but love thee better than any
That doth accrue to an unpleasing paramour.
I pray thee, madam, give me thy hand,
One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book.
Henceforth I never will be satisfied
With what thou press’d not with my hand.

JULIET.
By thy love I’ll help thee presently.
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptis’d;
Henceforth I never will be satisfied.

ULIET.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
What’s he that now is going out of door?
Is he a Parisian? What’s he in yonder tower?

JULIET.
He is, after all, a Capulet.
What’s in a Capulet?
A club, a ring, a goose,
A dagger, all in one! I bear no hatred, love no hateful appellation,
I only wish to be married to one I love.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

JULIET.
Will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
Not guilty, madam; thou wilt slay me.
The sin’d offender hath made me a bed
With thee since first my conversion.
I bear no hatred, but love thee better than any
That doth accrue to an unpleasing paramour.
I pray thee, madam, give me thy hand,
One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book.
Henceforth I never will be satisfied
With what thou press’d not with my hand.

JULIET.
By thy love I’ll help thee presently.
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptis’d;
Henceforth I never will be satisfied.

JULIET.
And bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Have not


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

gamingEO.
I will, shall I no more, than with a kiss from heaven my sweet love,—
Being bidden, bound, and loathed, I’ll descend.
This life is not mine own, and every who doth own it.
Therefore love’s bounty is beguil’d,
And from this I must devise remedies.
So loving-appreciating is my joy;
Being satisfied, is it not then enough I to love thee?

O, if I live, shall I not die, though bitterly vex’d,
To love thee so? O sweet my lord, give me thy light;
And with this I’ll procure a prosperous mansion.

Nay, yes, I will. This shall make the need of my life so.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on.
Stay, gentleman, hold, here is thy light;
Thou hands full of gold, upon thy back are ready weapons.
Stay, man, take this ring, for I will run on.
I’ll lay waste of this world, and in a day or two
I’ll hunt for new drugs. Thus from my desperate purse
I may spend the day. O, now, bid me leap,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
And soar with me into the air, unseen.
Tut! I have conquered thy land; and now stand upon thy back.
Hold, take this ring, for I’ll charge thee.
Henceforward I will swoop and dash,
As if by some power, thou my betossed foe,
With wings folded, I’ll whip thee to the west.
Here’s to my love! I long to find thee,
But labor against my will. O, now, bid me leap,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
And soar with me into the air, unseen.
Tut! I have conquered thy land; and now stand upon thy back.
Hold, take this ring, for I’ll charge thee.
Henceforward I will swoop and dash,
As if by some power, thou my betossed foe,
With wings folded, I’ll whip thee to the west.
Here’s to my love! I long to find thee,
But labor against my will. O, now, bid me leap,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
And soar with me into the air, unseen.
Tut! I have conquered thy land; and now stand upon thy back.
Hold, take this ring, for I’ll charge thee.
Henceforward I will swoop and dash,
As if by some power, thou my betossed foe,
With wings folded, I’ll whip thee to the west.
Here’s to my love! I long to find thee,
But labor against my will. O, now, bid me leap,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
And soar with me into the air, unseen.
Tut! I have conquered thy land; and now stand upon thy back.
Hold, take this ring, for I’ll charge thee.
Henceforward I will swoop and dash,
As if by some power, thou my betossed foe,
With wings folded, I’ll whip thee to the west.
Here’s to my love! I long to find thee,
But labor against my will. O, now, bid me leap,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
And soar with me into the air, unseen.
Tut! I have conquered thy land; and now stand upon thy back.
Hold, take this ring, for I’ll charge thee.
Henceforward I will swoop and dash,
As if by some power, thou my betossed foe,
With wings added, I’ll whip thee to the west.
Here’s to my love! I long to find thee,
But labor against my will. O, now, bid me leap,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
And soar with me into the air, unseen.
Tut! I have conquered thy land; and now stand upon thy back.
Hold, take this ring, for I’ll charge thee.
Henceforward I will dash and dash,
As if by some power, thou my betossed foe,
With wings added, I’ll whip thee to the west.
Here’s to my love! I long to find thee,
But labor against my will. O, now, bid me leap


===== CHECKPOINT 046 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

133UL.
I pay thy poverty, thou hast forgot
What thou hast begotten of my poverty.
Give me, give me! O find thee,
Put me to death, and not marry this man.

JULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

JULIET.
And lo, if thou detestable maw,
Put me to death, and not marry him?

JULIET.
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou hast. At least, if thou swear’st,
I’ll believe thee. At least, if thou wilt prove
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou wilt not prove guilty,
Do thou swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else swear not by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
I stand here devout, an unaccustom’d fool,
My life but a dream, an act of divine vanity,
I will not bear sin. Honest, swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
O swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy word that I shall speak again
Doth much help to need. O swear not by anything else,
Else is thy word too good:
For what purpose dost thou swear’st,
Else wouldst thou swear by anything else?

ULIET.
And lo, if thou detestable maw,
Put me to death, and not marry him?

JULIET.
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou hast. At least, if thou wilt prove
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou wilt not prove guilty,
Do thou swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
O swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy word that I shall speak again
Doth much help to need. O swear not by anything else,
Else is thy word too good:
For what purpose dost thou swear’st,
Else wouldst thou swear by anything else?

JULIET.
And lo, if thou detestable maw,
Put me to death, and not marry him?

JULIET.
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou hast. At least, if thou wilt prove
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou wilt not prove guilty,
Do thou swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy word that I shall speak again
Doth much help to need. O swear not by anything else,
Else is thy word too good:
For what purpose dost thou swear’st,
Else wouldst thou swear by anything else?

JULIET.
And lo, if thou detestable maw,
Put me to death, and not marry him?

JULIET.
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou hast. At least, if thou wilt prove
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou wilt not prove guilty,
Do thou swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy word that I shall speak again
Doth much help to need. O swear not by anything else,
Else is thy word too good:
For what purpose dost thou swear’st,
Else wouldst thou swear by anything else?

JULIET.
And lo, if thou detestable maw,
Put me to death, and not marry him?

JULIET.
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou hast. At least, if thou wilt prove
Not guilty, though I am sure
That thou wilt not prove guilty,
Do thou swear not by what thou speak’st,
Or else by what thou hast heard.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy word that I shall speak again
Doth much help to need. O swear not by anything else,
Else is thy word


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

iasisULA.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
This town is no town, for thine eyes
Do not see nor hear any such noise.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark.
Here’s to my love! O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
But where I am now is far more dismal
Than empty tomb. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
What’s here? A cup clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
This town is no town, for thine eyes
Do not see nor hear any such noise.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
But where I am now is far more dismal
Than empty tomb. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
What’s here? A cup clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
This town is no town, for thine eyes
Do not see nor hear any such noise.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
But where I am now is far more dismal
Than empty tomb. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
What’s here? A cup clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
This town is no town, for thine eyes
Do not see nor hear any such noise.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
But where I am now is far more dismal
Than empty tomb. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
What’s here? A cup clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
This town is no town, for thine eyes
Do not see nor hear any such noise.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
But where I am now is far more dismal
Than empty tomb. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
What’s here? A cup clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

supposedlyEO.
O teach me how I should forget to think.

JULIET.
’Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite; the tender touch of hers,
Being but gentle, so sweet to think.

JULIET.
Love give me strength, give me strength!
Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins
That almost freezes up the heat of life.
I’ll call them back again to comfort me.
Nurse!—What should she do here?
My dismal scene I needs must act alone.
Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?
No. This shall forbid it. Lie thou there.
What if it be a poison, which the Friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried
A holy man. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
Yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

CongressULIET.
Is the day so young?
Ah, yes, the sun is upon the highmost hill
Of this day’s journey, yet the measure done
Is as bare and pale as doth a drunkard’s dismal lamp.
Dry smells, sick and green, bitter and warm, warm furnish the cheeks,
And warm and warm feel good all over again.

JULIET.
Commend me to thy lady.

JULIET.
What say’st thou?

JULIET.
She speaks. Dear Nurse, tell me not how I should forget thee.

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
O find me a friend, and tempt him not to marry me.
I have got thee married, and I am expecting a child.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and what effect
Do thou intend upon this marriage?

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against myself.
I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thou, love thy company.
I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art out of breath?
O, why art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art out of breath?
O, why art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art out of breath?
O, why art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art out of breath?
O, why art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art out of breath?
O, why art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art out of breath?
O, why art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
Farewell.

JULIET.
By heaven I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm’d against thee, and thou stumblest on me.
Why I detest thee, love thy company.

JULIET.
Because thou art out of breath, why dost thou think
That thou art


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

loudspeULIET.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.
Farewell, dear father.

JULIET.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
Do not fear, gentleman; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
By and by we go; we come to an end.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging; I should be here in a minute.

JULIET.
By and by we go; we come to an end.

JULIET.
Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging; I should be here in a minute.

JULIET.
By and by we go; we come to an end.

JULIET.
Would a woman of such sweet smell
Leave me so unsatisfied, so unsatisfied!
Farewell; I beseech you, stars!
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I see you have left me so unsatisfied, so unsatisfied!
Farewell; I beseech you, stars!
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I see you have left me so unsatisfied, so unsatisfied!
Farewell; I beseech you, stars!
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.
I shall not fail. God join’d my heart and Romeo’s.
I will not fail; my betossed life is as forfeit,
My soul as forfeit, and all my joy as forfeit.
Then, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak.


===== CHECKPOINT 047 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

coalesULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
I would I were thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
I would I were thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Ha, banishment? Then banishment? Then say death;
And exile? O no end, lurk, wanting.
The farther away death comes from here,
The more will be her vexation!
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Would I were thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Ha, banishment? Then banishment? Then say death;
And exile? O no end, lurk, wanting.
The farther away death comes from here,
The more will be her vexation!
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Would I were thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
I would, in my heart,
Would I were thy cousin.

JULIET.
A right good markman, and a boundsman!
Good gentleman, you are an honourable man.
I pray thee leave me to myself,
And do the thing I bid thee do.

ULIET.
Would I were thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
I would, in my heart,
Would I were thy cousin.

JULIET.
A right good markman, and a boundsman!
Good gentleman, you are an honourable man.
I pray thee leave me to myself,
And do the thing I bid thee do.

JULIET.
By and by I come
To cease thy strife and leave me to myself.
Let me be satisfied, is’t true,
That I am a wife to my lord and father;
And yet let me live, that I may never again be the father.

ULIET.
A right good markman, and a boundsman!
Good gentleman, you are an honourable man.
I pray thee leave me to myself,
And do the thing I bid thee do.

JULIET.
By and by I come
To cease thy


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

PointULIET.
Well, gentle Mercutio, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
Farewell, fellow; I will excuse myself
To be gone and do the thing I bid thee do,
Without apology. Pardon, I beseech thee.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!
The more I take this hand,
The more I shall be a wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!
The more I take this hand,
The more I shall be a wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.

ULIET.
Well, gentle Mercutio, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
Farewell, fellow; I will excuse myself
To be gone and do the thing I bid thee do,
Without apology. Pardon, I beseech thee.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

inchEO.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
I am not I if there be such an I;
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
But if he be slain, say Ay; or if not, No.
Brief sounds determine of my weal or woe.

ROMEO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
I am sorry, my intercession so brief.
Had I eyes, ears, or hands,
I’ll tell thee ere thou wilt speak. O, here’s sweet flower of joy
Stands out such sadness: for love’s pale centre is not Romeo’s,
Nor that of all the world’s fairs,
Nor that of the charnel-house,
Nor that of the vaulty cataranks,
Nor that of the vaulty vaulty vaulty white walls,
Containing the coldest and warmest air of deep sleep.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
What are they, I beseech you?

EO.
Bid a sick man in sadness make his will
A word ill urg’d to one that is so ill.
I am sorry, my intercession so brief.
Had I eyes, ears, or hands,
I’ll tell thee ere thou wilt speak. O, here’s sweet flower of joy
Stands out such sadness: for love’s pale centre is not Romeo’s,
Nor that of all the world’s fairs,
Nor that of the vaulty vaulty vaulty white walls,
Containing the coldest and warmest air of deep sleep.

ROMEO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
What are they, I beseech you?

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
And where is my Nurse?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to me. I long to die,
And pay no worship to the impure sun.

JULIET.
Go hence, get thee hence, for I will not away.
I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to me. I long to die,
And pay no worship to the impure sun.

JULIET.
Madam, I am content. What is business?

EO.
And joy comes well in such a needy time.
What are they, I beseech you?

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
And where is my Nurse?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to me. I long to die,
And pay no worship to the impure sun.

JULIET.
Madam, I am content. What is business?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to me. I long to die,
And pay no worship to the impure sun.

JULIET.
Madam, I am content. What is business?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.
Be not so long to me. I long to die,
And pay no worship to the impure sun.

JULIET.
Madam, I am content. What is business?

JUL


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ConservativeULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO.
Bid thy pains mark thy youth
As holy to this day;
For thine kinsmen have shown no mercy on me
When they met with my dearest love,
And Romeo slain himself? Yet pardon me,
And not kill me. Both these woes follow
From this day on. This mountain topside is death;
More fierce is death than loving love goes,
More is overtax’d than Romeo’s love, and O much more
Doth loving Phoebus’s doom,
For Romeo is already deathly heavy:
Therefore sparing me, not sparing thee,
Is my coz.

ROMEO.
Bid thy pains mark thy youth
As holy to this day;
For thine kinsmen have shown no mercy on me
When they met with my dearest love,
And Romeo slain himself? Yet pardon me,
And not kill me. Both these woes follow
From this day on. This mountain topside is death;
More fierce is death than loving love goes,
More is overtax’d than Romeo’s love, and O much more
Doth loving Phoebus’s doom,
For Romeo is already deathly heavy:
Therefore sparing me, not sparing thee,
Is my coz.

ROMEO.
Bid thy pains mark thy youth
As holy to this day;
For thine kinsmen have shown no mercy on me
When they met with my dearest love,
And Romeo slain himself? Yet pardon me,
And not kill me. Both these woes follow
From this day on. This mountain topside is death;
More fierce is death than loving love goes,
More is overtax’d than Romeo’s love, and O much more
Doth loving Phoebus’s doom,
For Romeo is already deathly heavy:
Therefore sparing me, not sparing thee,
Is my coz.

ROMEO.
Bid thy pains mark thy youth
As holy to this day;
For thine kinsmen have shown no mercy on me
When they met with my dearest love,
And Romeo slain himself? Yet pardon me,
And not kill me. Both these woes follow
From this day on. This mountain topside is death;
More fierce is death than loving love goes,
More is overtax’d than Romeo’s love, and O much more
Doth loving Phoebus’s doom,
For Romeo is already deathly heavy:
Therefore sparing me, not sparing thee,
Is my coz.

ROMEO.
And clos’d my clos’d love to my dearest love,
And he’ll still keep me company.

ROMEO.
O wilt thou ne’er call me fain,
Else would I dwell on form,
Or would thou think me fain,
Else wouldst thou dwell on form,
And I’ll still stay the youthful love
Of thine. O good Romeo,
You have made me fain,
But not to have that love that thou dost love
With so fair a face.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears:
What is it else? A madness most discreet,
A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

ROMEO.
O blessed, blessed night. I am afeard,
Being but a little farther off,
From home, than my love’s abode.

ROMEO.
Farewell. Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But from their eyes, towards love. As schoolboys from their books,
Things move in little spheres, like stars in heaven,
Which their teachers call a sun reviv’d.

EO.
And clos’d my clos’d love to my dearest love,
And he’ll still stay the youthful love
Of thine. O good Romeo,
You have made me fain,
But not to have that love that thou dost love
With so fair a face.
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;
Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;
Being


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

èreEO.
O shut the door, and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help!

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!

ULIET.
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower,
Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk
Where serpents are. Chain me with roaring bears;
Or hide me nightly in a charnel-house,
O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,
With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls.
Or bid me go into a new-made grave,
And hide me with a dead man in his shroud;
Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble,
And I will do it without fear or doubt,
To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!

JULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!

JULIET.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.
Farewell. God knows when we shall meet again.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
Like cold snow upon a sudden waking man’s heart.
I’ll call them back again to comfort me.
Nurse!—What should she do here?
My dismal scene I needs must act alone.
Come, vial. Drink all, and left no friendly drop
To help me after? I will kiss thy lips.
Haply some poison yet doth hang on them,
To make me die with a restorative.

ULIET.
Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!

JULIET.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.
Farewell. God knows when we shall meet again.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
Like cold snow upon a sudden waking man’s heart.
I’ll call them back again to comfort me.
Nurse!—What should she do here?
My dismal scene I needs act alone.
Come, vial. Drink all, and left no friendly drop
To help me after? I will kiss thy lips.
Haply some poison yet doth hang on them,
To make me die with a restorative.

JULIET.
Give me, give me!

JULIET.
An hour and a half is enough, I am sure,
Since I have bought the necessaries of life.

ROMEO.
Ay me, what if my life were as sudden fast changing
As that


===== CHECKPOINT 048 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

intsEO.
Is that so? Then I defy you, stars!
Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses. I will hence tonight.

ROMEO.
Tush, thou art deceiv’d.
Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do.
Hast thou no letters to me from the Friar?

ROMEO.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins
That almost freezes up the heat of life. Dear lord, send me letters.

ROMEO.
Is there no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
It seems so. Then banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself?
Hence banished is banish’d from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Think upon that.

ROMEO.
What world is this, then? There is no world without Verona


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

bindsULIET.
That is no slander, sir, which is a truth,
And what I spake, I spake it to my face.

JULIET.
I would not speak of slander till I had heard it told
By a man I love. I have known nothing of that name,
Nor did I know it before. I am too fond
To dwell upon such personal affray.

JULIET.
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
Speak not of remedy, unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
Speak not of remedy, unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.

God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
Speak not of remedy, unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands;
And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo’s seal’d,
Shall be the label to another deed,
Or my true heart with treacherous revolt
Turn to another, this shall slay them both.
Therefore, out of thy long-experienc’d time,
Give me some present counsel, or behold
’Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife
Shall play the empire, arbitrating that
Which the commission of thy years and art
Could to no issue of true honour bring.
Be not so long to speak. I long to die,
If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

JULIET.
Speak not of remedy, unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help,
Do thou but call my resolution wise,
And with this knife I’ll


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

urgesEO: And joy comes well in such a needy time.
Lovely is she, and fairly fair is she.
Mercutio likewise shows no hatred of fair ladies,
But laughs bitterly at those who slander her.
He is a gentleman, and she is fair; so fair may she be.
But all this did not affect my heart.
It was not till I came to terms with Juliet that I rose to such a feeling dislike.

JULIET.
Good even to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

ULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more than your fortitude.

JULIET.
I am content, so be it. But farewell compliment.

JULIET.
Proud saint, you have saved the day!

JULIET.
And thanks to my ghostly confessor,
I have learnt a thousand times that my ghostly confessor
may indeed kiss fair ladies’ brows.

JULIET.
Commend me to my ghostly confessor.

JULIET.
Your infidelity proves more


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

lectionsULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it,
That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ROMEO.
What less than doomsday is the Prince’s doom?

ROMEO.
Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say death;
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say banishment.

ROMEO.
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death.


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

sesULIET.
O Fortune, Fortune! How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend.

ROMEO.
And welcome, youthful lord!

JULIET.
How now, what news is yond news?
Farewell, farewell, one kiss, and I’ll descend


===== CHECKPOINT 049 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

unearthedEO.
In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet.
Said he not so? Or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet,
To think it was so? O, give me thy hand,
One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book.
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.
A grave? O no, a lantern, slaught’red youth,
For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes
This vault a feasting presence full of light.
Death, lie thou there, by a dead man interr’d.
How oft when men are at the point of death
Have they been merry! Which their keepers call
A lightning before death. O, how may I
Call this a lightning? O my love, my wife,
Death that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
O, what more favour can I do to thee
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
To sunder his that was thine enemy?
Forgive me, cousin. Ah, dear Juliet,
Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe
That unsubstantial death is amorous;
And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
For fear of that I still will stay with thee,
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again. Here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chambermaids. O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest;
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last.
Arms, take your last embrace! And, lips, O you
The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engrossing death.
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark.
Here’s to my love! O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

JULIET.
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am. Where is my Romeo?

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
What’s here? A cup clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
O churl. Drink all, and left no friendly drop
To help me after? I will kiss thy lips.
Haply some poison yet doth hang on them,
To make me die with a restorative.

EO.
In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet.
Said he not so? Or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet,
To think it was so? O, give me thy hand,
One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book.
I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.
A grave? O no, a lantern, slaught’red youth,
For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes
This vault a feasting presence full of light.
Death, lie thou there, by a dead man interr’d.
How oft when men are at the point of death
Have they been merry! Which their keepers call
A lightning before death. O, how may I
Call this a lightning? O my love, my wife,
Death that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.
Thou art not conquer’d. Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

GeneticEO.
Bid her devise
Some means to come to shrift this afternoon,
And there she shall at Friar Lawrence’ cell
Be shriv’d and married. Here is for thy pains.

ROMEO.
Indeed I should have ask’d thee before;
But he doth not attend me.

ROMEO.
Let me be satisfied, is’t good enough.

ROMEO.
Good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird would:

ROMEO.
Well, sleep well. Let me be satisfied,
Was’t good enough?

EO.
Indeed I should have ask’d thee before;
But he doth not attend me.

ROMEO.
Let me be satisfied, is’t good enough.

ROMEO.
Good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

ROMEO.
’Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone,
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird would:

ROMEO.
Well, sleep well. Let me be satisfied,
Was’t good enough?

ROMEO.
O God! O Nurse, I am breath’d so poor!

ROMEO.
Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

EO.
Well, sleep well. Let me be satisfied,
Was’t good enough?

ROMEO.
O God! O Nurse, I am breath’d so poor!

ROMEO.
Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

ROMEO.
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

EO.
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

ROMEO.
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

ROMEO.
I fear too early: for I should have been so early.

EO.
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

ROMEO.
I fear too early: for I should have been so early.

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

EO.
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

ROMEO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

ROMEO.
Here’s such a flower!

ROMEO.
Bid hers with love, and gave it me for thy pains.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll be fine.

EO.
I dreamt a dream tonight.

ROMEO.
Here’s such a flower!

ROMEO.
Bid hers with love, and gave it me for thy pains.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll be fine.

ROMEO.
Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage,
Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath
Forbid this bandying in Verona streets.
Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!

ROMEO.
Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.

EO.
Here’s such a flower!

ROMEO.
Bid hers with love, and gave it me for thy pains.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll be fine.

ROMEO.
Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage,
Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath
Forbid this bandying in Verona streets.
Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!

ROMEO.
Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.

ROMEO.
I thought all for the best.

EO.
Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage,
Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath
Forbid this bandying in Verona streets.
Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!

ROMEO.
Courage,


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

BeforeULIET.
How cam’st thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

JULIET.
Indeed I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo till I behold him—dead—
Is my poor heart so for a kinsman vex’d.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it,
That Romeo should upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him nam’d, and cannot come to him,
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that hath slaughter’d him.

JULIET.
I dreamt my sweet pastime at Lawrence’ cell,
And then came I hither, and found him dead—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!
But good Nurse, if you will bear with me this letter,
Soon I’ll be a wife to Romeo,
And his ashes will be spent in my breast.

JULIET.
I pray thee tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed.

JULIET.
Farewell. God knows when I shall meet him.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
That almost freezes up the heat of life.
I’ll call them back again to comfort me.
Nurse!—What should she do here?
My dismal scene I needs must act alone.
Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?
No, No! This shall forbid it. Lie thou there.
What if it be a poison, which the Friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
I wake before the time that Romeo
Come to redeem me? There’s a fearful point!
Shall I not then be stifled in the vault,
To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
Or, if I live, is it not very like,
The horrible conceit of death and night,
Together with the terror of the place,
As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
Where for this many hundred years the bones
Of all my buried ancestors are pack’d,
Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
At some hours in the night spirits resort—
Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth,
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad.
O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
Environed with all these hideous fears,
And madly play with my forefathers’ joints?
And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
O look, methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
Seeking out Romeo that did spit his body
Upon a rapier’s point. Stay, Tybalt!
Romeo, Romeo, here’s drink! I drink to thee.

ROMEO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.
My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom’d spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead,—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!—
And breath’d such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reviv’d, and was an emperor.
Ah me, how sweet is love itself possess’d,
When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy.
News from Ver


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

composULA.
Then I would you tell my lady I am gone?

ROMEO.
What shall I do?

ULA.
What shall I do?

ROMEO.
Go with me, Nurse.

ULA.
What shall I do?

ROMEO.
Go with me, Nurse.

JULIET.
And thou wilt woo.

JULIET.
And thou wilt woo.

JULIET.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands.
Hie hence to my wedding bed.

ULA.
What shall I do?

ROMEO.
Go with me, Nurse.

JULIET.
And thou wilt woo.

JULIET.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands.
Hie hence to my wedding bed.

JULIET.
And my bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom’d spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead,—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!—
And breath’d such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reviv’d, and was an emperor.
Ah me, how sweet is love itself possess’d,
When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy.
News from Verona! How now, Balthasar?
Dost thou not bring me letters from the Friar?

ROMEO.
Is thy lady well? I pray thee say I am.

ULIET.
And thou wilt woo.

JULIET.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands.
Hie hence to my wedding bed.

JULIET.
And my bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom’d spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead,—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!—
And breath’d such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reviv’d, and was an emperor.
Ah me, how sweet is love itself possess’d,
When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy.
News from Verona! How now, Balthasar?
Dost thou not bring me letters from the Friar?

ROMEO.
Is thy lady well? I pray thee say I am.

ROMEO.
I do protest my lord’s faithful service to thee by urging me to return.

ROMEO.
I do protest my lord’s faithful service to thee by urging me to return.

ROMEO.
I did protest my lord’s faithful service to thee by urging me to return.

ROMEO.
So thou wilt not refuse it.

ULIET.
And thou wilt woo.

JULIET.
God join’d my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands.
Hie hence to my wedding bed.

JULIET.
And my bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom’d spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead,—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!—
And breath’d such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reviv’d, and was an emperor.
Ah me, how sweet is love itself possess’d,
When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy.
News from Verona! How now, Balthasar?
Dost thou not bring me letters from the Friar?

ROMEO.
Is thy lady well? I pray thee say I am.

ROMEO.
I do protest my lord’s faithful service to thee by urging me to return.

ROMEO.
So thou wilt not refuse it.

JULIET.
And farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Thou talk’st of nothing.

ULIET.
And farewell, good fellow.

ROMEO.
Thou talk’st of nothing.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

burgersULIET.
I gave thee mine before thou didst request it;
And yet I would it were to give again.

ROMEO.
Would’st thou withdraw it? For what purpose, love?

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Do thou provoke me? Or am I vex’d?

ROMEO.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

ULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Do thou provoke me? Or am I vex’d?

ROMEO.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

ROMEO.
O, thou hast made a love’s cave
Within which no love can find fellowship.
Farewell, budge one foot, and fall upon the ground.
The other leans upon the other, loving-kindling him.

ROMEO.
I’faith, I am fortune’s fool; and he that hath trust in my ghostly confessor
Should practise true modesty.

ULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

ROMEO.
O, thou hast made a love’s cave
Within which no love can find fellowship.
Farewell, budge one foot, and fall upon the ground.
The other leans upon the other, loving-kindling him.

ROMEO.
I’faith, I am fortune’s fool; and he that hath trust in my ghostly confessor
Should practise true modesty.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

ROMEO.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For


===== CHECKPOINT 050 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

BecEO.
Well, that was no hurt. But I think you have heard enough.
Come hither, Nurse. What is yond gentleman?

JULIET.
What’s he that now is going out of door?

JULIET.
By and by I will return to you.

JULIET.
What’s he that follows here, that would not dance?

JULIET.
Go ask his name. If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

ULIET.
What’s he that follows here, that would not dance?

JULIET.
Go ask his name. If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
Now, good sweet Nurse,—

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
Now, good sweet Nurse,—

JULIET.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
And thanks be to God, which instituted marriage before our eyes,
That through holy marriage we may all hereafter be one.

JULIET.
I’ll tell thee as I go along,—

ULIET.
Now, good sweet Nurse,—

JULIET.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
And thanks be to God, which instituted marriage before our eyes,
That through holy marriage we may all hereafter be one.

JULIET.
I’ll tell thee as I go along,—

JULIET.
Then in a minute, my true knight,
O holy father, take the ‘villain’ back again,
That late thou gav’st me, for I am ever pilgrim
To Paradise.

JULIET.
A thousand times good lad, and I’ll still stay the youthful.

ULIET.
Then in a minute, my true knight,
O holy father, take the ‘villain’ back again,
That late thou gav’st me, for I am ever pilgrim
To Paradise.

JULIET.
A thousand times good lad, and I’ll still stay the youthful.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
By the hour of nine.

JULIET.
And thanks be to God, which instituted marriage before our eyes,
That through holy marriage we may all hereafter be one.

JULIET.
I’ll tell thee as I go along,—

JULIET.
Then in a minute, my true knight,
O holy father, take the ‘villain’ back again,
That late thou gav’st me, for I am ever pilgrim
To Paradise.

JULIET.
A thousand times good lad, and I’ll still stay the youthful.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

168EO.
In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet.
Said he not so? Or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet, to think it was so?

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
I am not I if there be such an I;
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with this;
Or, if thou consent, I’ll be new baptis’d.

JULIET.
Madam, if there be such an I,
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with this;
Or, if thou consent, I’ll be new baptis’d.

JULIET.
Madam, if there be such an I,
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with this;
Or, if thou consent, I’ll be new baptis’d.

JULIET.
Madam, in faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet.
Said he not so? Or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet, to think it was so?

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
I am not I if there be such an I;
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with this;
Or, if thou consent, I’ll be new baptis’d.

JULIET.
Madam, in faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet.
Said he not so? Or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet, to think it was so?

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
I am not I if there be such an I;
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with this;
Or, if thou consent, I’ll be new baptis’d.

JULIET.
Madam, in faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet.
Said he not so? Or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet, to think it was so?

JULIET.
What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar’d in dismal hell.
Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but Ay,
And that bare vowel I shall poison more
Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice.
I am not I if there be such an I;
Or those eyes shut that make thee answer Ay.
Either thou or I, or both, must go with this;
Or, if thou consent, I’ll be new baptis’d


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

branceULIET.
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.

JULIET.
Prodigious birth of love, that is no slander,
But a glorious truth, an honourable one,
My true heart and my true love well coz.

JULIET.
A right good markman, and I’ll stand as a knight in heure.

JULIET.
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

JULIET.
Farewell. God knows when we shall meet again.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins
That almost freezes up the heat of life.
I’ll call them back again to comfort me.
Nurse!—What should she do here?
My dismal scene I needs must act alone.
Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?
No, No! This shall forbid it. Lie thou there.
What if it be a poison, which the Friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is. And yet methinks it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
I wake before the time that Romeo
Come to redeem me? There’s a fearful point!
Shall I not then be stifled in the vault,
To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
Or, if I live, is it not very like,
The horrible conceit of death and night,
Together with the terror of the place,
As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
Where for this many hundred years the bones
Of all my buried ancestors are pack’d,
Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
At some hours in the night spirits resort—
Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth,
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad.
O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
Environed with all these hideous fears,
And madly play with my forefathers’ joints?
And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
O look, methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
Seeking out Romeo that did spit his body
Upon a rapier’s point. Stay, Tybalt, stay!
Romeo, Romeo, Romeo, here’s drink! I drink to thee.

ROMEO.
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.
My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom’d spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead,—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!—
And breath’d such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reviv’d, and was an emperor.
Ah me, how sweet is love itself possess’d,
When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy.
News from Verona! How now, Balthasar?
Dost thou not bring me letters from the Friar?
How doth my lady? Is my father well?
How fares my Juliet? That I ask again;
For nothing can be ill if she be well.

ULIET.
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting. Villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know’st me not.

JULIET.
Farewell. God knows when we shall meet again.
I have a faint cold fear thrills


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 003 K 50 P 0.9 =====

mathematicalEO.
Is she a Capulet?
No. But what of that, and what of the like with her father?

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not that name, I should never be a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
Had I not, I would have been a Capulet.

JULIET.
’Tis but thy name that


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 004 K 50 P 0.9 =====

ESAULIET.
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
Dove-feather’d raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace.

JULIET.
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

JULIET.
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I thy three-hours’ wife have mangled it?
But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband.
Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring,
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you mistaking offer up to joy.
My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain,
And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband.
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,
That murder’d me. I would forget it fain,
But O, it presses to my memory
Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds.
Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banished.
That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
Was woe enough, if it had ended there.
Or if sour woe delights in fellowship,
And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
Why follow’d not, when she said Tybalt’s dead,
Thy father or thy mother, nay or both,
Which modern lamentation might have mov’d?
But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
‘Romeo is banished’—to speak that word
Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
All slain, all dead. Romeo is banished,
There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
In that word’s death, no words can that woe sound.
Where is my father and my mother, Nurse?

JULIET.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent,
When theirs are dry, for Romeo’s banishment.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I; for Romeo is exil’d.
He made you for a highway to my bed,
But I, a maid, die maiden-widowed.
Come cords, come Nurse, I’ll to my wedding bed,
And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead.

ULIET.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent,
When theirs are dry, for Romeo’s banishment.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I; for Romeo is exil’d.
He made you for a highway to my bed,
But I, a maid, die maiden-widowed.
Come cords, come Nurse, I’ll to my wedding bed,
And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead.

JULIET.
O find him, give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

ROMEO.
Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,
That I yet know not?

ULIET.
Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent,
When theirs are dry, for Romeo’s banishment.
Take up those cords. Poor ropes, you are beguil’d,
Both you and I;


===== CHECKPOINT 051 EX # 005 K 50 P 0.9 =====

MichaelEO.
Good heart, at what?

ROMEO.
By the grace of God!

ROMEO.
I pray thee kiss my love.

ROMEO.
And I’ll, no doubt, be married in a month.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

ROMEO.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

ULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

ROMEO.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

ROMEO.
So let me be frank and give you my blessing.

ULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

ROMEO.
So let me be frank and give you my blessing.

JULIET.
Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage,
Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath
Forbid this bandying in Verona streets.
Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!

ULIET.
Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

ROMEO.
Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage,
Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath
Forbid this bandying in Verona streets.
Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!

JULIET.
Commend me to thy lady.

ROMEO.
I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.

ULIET.
Commend me to thy lady.

ROMEO.
I warrant thee my man’s as true as steel.

JULIET.
And no torture befell him, for thine eye
Knew him ere he saw me.
Or if thou overheard’st, I’ll frown and be perverse,
So thou mightst think I’d catch the eye of a love.
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.

ULIET.
And no torture befell him, for thine eye
Knew him ere he saw me.
Or if thou overheard’st, I’ll frown and be perverse,
So thou mightst think I’d catch the eye of a love.
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.

JULIET.
I will not fail. ’Tis twenty years till then.

ULIET.
And no torture befell him, for thine eye
Knew him ere he saw me.
Or if thou overheard’st, I’ll frown and be perverse,
So thou mightst think I’d catch the eye of a love.


===== CHECKPOINT 052 EX # 001 K 50 P 0.9 =====

managerialEO.
Is she a Capulet?
O dear account! My life were better ended by thy help!

JULIET.
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds.
Towards Phoebus’ lodging, I will return fire-ey’d fury.
Gentle Mercutio, put an end to this strife by this.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

JULIET.
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Tush, thou womb of death,
Gorg’d with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Well, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.

ROMEO.
Good, in that hit you miss: I’ll cram thee with more food

JULIET.
And in despite, I’ll cram thee with more food.


===== CHECKPOINT 052 EX # 002 K 50 P 0.9 =====

exhibitionsEO.
Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford.
Farewell, dear father.

JULIET.
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests; and am enjoin’d
By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here,
To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.
Henceforward I am ever rul’d by you.

JULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

ULIET.
I met the youthful lord at Lawrence’ cell,
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.

JULIET.
Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments
As you think fit to furnish me tomorrow?

JULIET.
Ay, those attires are best. But, gentle Nurse,
I pray thee leave me to myself tonight;
For I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
What, shall this be arranged for me today?

JULIET.
By anointing thee with warm coals.
Henceforward I have been faithfully kept abreast of your every motion,
And all my business in such a timely manner.

JULIET.
Go, get thee hence, for I have need of many orisons
To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
Which, well thou know’st, is cross and full of sin.

JULIET.
No, madam; we have cull’d such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state tomorrow.
So please you, let me now be left alone,
And let the nurse this night sit up with you,
For I am sure you have your hands full all
In this so sudden business.

JULIET.
What, shall this be arranged for me today?

JULIET.
By anointing thee with warm coals.
Henceforward I have been faithfully kept abreast of your every motion,
And all my business in such a timely manner.